DIY: Heart Bath Bombs (For Valentine’s Day)

DIY Heart Bath Bombs (for Valentine's Day)
Happy February! Today we are sharing a BONUS project on how to make pretty Heart Bath Bombs for your friends and family this Valentine’s Day. Alison and I got together with some friends to make these and they turned out wonderful! We used all natural ingredients and scented them with pure essential oils of lavender and rose geranium (ie. Heaven!).

DIY: Heart Bath Bomb (for Valentine's Day)

Ingredients:

• 2 cups baking soda
• 1 cup citric acid
• 3 tablespoons kaolin (white) clay
• 1 tablespoon hibiscus flower powder
• 1/2 teaspoon olive oil
• Rose petals
• Witch hazel
• 25 drops lavender essential oil
• 25 drops rose geranium essential oil

Additional Tools:

• Heart silicone mold
• Mixing bowl
• Spray bottle
• Parchment paper

DIY: Heart Bath Bomb (for Valentine's Day)

Gather your supplies and pour some witch hazel into a spray bottle and set aside. Next add rose petals to the bottom of the silicone mold (be careful not to add too many, you just want a light sprinkle) and set aside. In your mixing bowl, combine the dry ingredients (baking soda, citric acid, clay, hibiscus powder) and mix with your hands, breaking up any clumps.

DIY: Heart Bath Bomb (for Valentine's Day)

Next combine the olive oil and essential oils together, then add it to the mixing bowl and use your hands to fully incorporate.

DIY: Heart Bath Bomb (for Valentine's Day)

Now comes the fun part. Spray witch hazel, a few sprays at a time, into the mixture using your hands to incorporate. You’ll want to work quickly as the citric acid will fizz with each spray. Continue to spray a little at a time until you reach a clump-like consistency that holds together in your hands.

DIY: Heart Bath Bomb (for Valentine's Day)
DIY: Heart Bath Bomb (for Valentine's Day)
Finally, pack the mixture into the silicone mold. Really push it in tight! Let dry in the mold for 10-15 minutes, then turn onto parchment paper and remove the mold. Let bath bombs dry overnight.

DIY: Heart Bath Bomb (for Valentine's Day)

We’d like to wish you all a Happy Valentine’s Day! Don’t forget to check out our Monthly DIY Craft Challenge and submit your own handmade project!

DIY: Heart Bath Bomb (for Valentine's Day)

DIY: Target My Heart Pincushion

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About 12 years ago I stitched together a utilitarian pillow stuffed with cloth scraps and called it a pincushion. It was my sad companion through many a sewing project, and as much as I wanted to replace it I never made the time.

Well! The time has come.

Seeing as it’s February and Stitches + Threads time, let’s turn Cupid’s target into a nifty little pincushion.

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SUPPLIES:

  • Red and white craft felt
  • Corresponding thread or embroidery floss
  • A small scrap of chipboard
  • A black permanent marker (I used a Sharpie Stained marker.)
  • Your favorite adhesive
  • A pair or scissors
  • Sewing needle
  • A strong thin magnet
  • The printed fabric template: to download click on the image below, or here.

hearttarget

  • * Optional : If you’d like to turn your pincushion into a wrist band you will need a small length of elastic and a second magnet.

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First use the “Wrist Guard” template piece to cut a small heart out of chipboard. This will be place inside the pincushion to keep you from pushing pins all the way through. Use your favorite adhesive to attach one magnet to this piece of chipboard.

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Next tape a small piece of white felt to the template sheet and use a window to trace the rings of the target shape with your black marker. You may need to go over it a few times to make the rings as dark as possible.

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Set this piece aside for a moment to dry or you will end up with marker all over your hands. (Which is fun!) While you are waiting, use the “Heart” template to cut two red heart pieces, then when the target is dry cut just outside of the first dark ring. Keep all your little fabric scraps for the stuffing steps later. (Waste not, want not and all that.)

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Place the target piece in the center of one of the heart pieces and pinch or pin them together. Using black thread or embroidery floss whip the target down to attach it to the pincushion. (I used a blanket appliqué stitch around my target, similar to the one Rachel used in her Alphabet Hoop Art DIY . You can watch a video of how it is done here. If this looks tricky to you, use any old stitch you want!)

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When the target is all stitched down make a sandwich with the remaining pieces: target+heart piece, chipboard+magnet piece, plain heart piece.

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Then use thread (or floss) to stitch the two red felt heart pieces together, beginning at the top of one side. (For this stitching I used a blanket stitch. You can see a video of a pro doing it here. Any stitch should work to make this little pillow, so play around with it!)

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When you reach the top of the other side of the heart, stop sewing and collect your scraps to stuff. Any large scraps can be cut into tinier pieces that will fluff up the inside of you cushion.

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Start to fill the space between the chipboard wrist guard and the heart+target piece, using a little bit of stuffing at a time. Make sure to press into the point and sides of your heart to make it really puff.

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When you’ve got it almost over-full stitch up the remaining open space and tie a firm knot. Tuck your thread-end into the heart or trim it and you’re all done!

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So, why did I have you include a magnet? Because magnets are awesome! If you’re prone to losing straight pins like a startled porcupine loses quills you’ll appreciate the pin collecting magic of a strong magnet. Have a magnetic board or fridge in your making space? Smack your pincushion there for safe keeping!

But if you want to really kick your pincushion up a notch…

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you can make a magnetic wrist band. Cut a piece of elastic a little bit smaller than your wrist, and glue a magnet to one end. Sew the two ends together to form a loop, stitching around the magnet.

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Then you should be able to attach your pincushion temporarily to your wrist whenever it’s convenient.

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If you’re anything like me, it will be convenient a lot.

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I don’t think I’ll ever look back to the silly old pincushion of yesterday, but I am tempted to make a bunch more of these guys. Maybe a porcupine…

DIY: Heart Embroidery Sampler (For Beginners)

DIY: Heart Embroidery Sampler (for beginners)

Embroidery is one of my favorite craft mediums. It’s the perfect ‘lap’ project to work on while watching a movie and I love that I can pick up my project, work on a few stitches and just as easily put it down again. I first learned embroidery from my grandmother, who taught me to sew when I was a kid. Since then I have accumulated a big collection of vintage embroidery kits, endless boxes of floss, and have been known to transform my own art into embroidered masterpieces.

In case you haven’t heard, the DIY Craft Challenge is back! This month’s theme is Stitches & Threads, which pairs perfectly with embroidery. I’ve been longing to create a beginner embroidery tutorial for quite some time now, so this month is the perfect opportunity! And since it’s February, I made sure to design a project that can also become a Valentine for someone special in your life!

What is an embroidery sampler?

An embroidery sampler is created as a demonstration or test of skill in needlework. It’s the perfect way to practice different kinds of stitches and make something pretty at the same time.

There are hundreds of different types of embroidery stitches in existence. For this beginner project, I’ve chosen just seven: three basic outline stitches (Running Stitch, Back Stitch and Chain Stitch) and four decorative stitches (Threaded Running Stitch, Cross Stitch, Star Stitch and Fern Stitch). To make these stitches as easy to learn as possible I’ve included both photos with written instructions and a video link for each stitch.

7 Embroidery Stitches For Beginners

MATERIALS:

  • 8-inch diameter embroidery hoop:
    The Heart Sampler pattern was created for an 8” hoop but if you would like to make a different size sampler, you can shrink or enlarge the pattern provided to fit your hoop. I’d recommend not going smaller that 6” for this pattern.
  • Hand-sewing/embroidery needle:
    You’ll want to use a medium sized needle with a sharp point and a long opening, or eye, at one end, for easy threading.
  • Embroidery floss (7 different colors):
    Embroidery floss comes in a small bundle or skein and there are tons of colors available (check your local craft store). A length of floss is made up of six smaller strands or plies that are twisted together. You can use all of them or divide them up and use two, three or four plies for a thinner line. For this project, we’ll be using all 6 plies on all our stitches EXCEPT the star stitch, where we will use only three plies.
  • 12”x12” square of fabric (quilter’s cotton or linen works best):
    The looser the weave of your fabric, the more forgiving it can be when taking out stitches and starting over. A finer weave fabric is more likely to show holes from your needle.
  • Sewing scissors:
    Sewing scissors are sharp and used only for cutting thread and fabric. Avoid using your sewing scissors to cut paper or anything else beside fabric so that you don’t dull the blades.
  • Iron & ironing board
  • Fine-lead pencil (or nonpermanent fabric marking pen):
  • Crayola Light-Up Tracing Pad (or light table or sunny window)
  • Washi tape (or masking tape or pins)
  • Paper cutter (or scissors & ruler)
  • Heart Sampler Pattern

Other Useful Tools:

  • A needle threader (helpful when you find yourself struggling to thread your needle!)
  • Thimble (can prevent you from stabbing yourself in the finger with your needle. Ouch!)

DIY: Embroidery Sampler (For Beginners)

INSTRUCTIONS:

Step One: Prep the Pattern & Fabric

Download the Heart Sampler Pattern HERE and print out onto white copy paper. Then cut 1.25” from both the top and bottom of the page to create a square piece of paper with the pattern at the center.

Cut your fabric to size. I cut mine to be 12”x12” square leaving me plenty of extra. You could also get away with a 10”x10” piece of fabric too. Press your fabric to rid of any wrinkles using a hot iron.

How to use the pattern:

Use the lines of the pattern as a guide for your stitches. You’ll notice that each line has an assigned number to indicate which stitch to use. In this tutorial I will demonstrate how to make each stitch. There are a few stitches that are used more than once (like the running stitch, back stitch and chain stitch). Feel free to fill in these stitches as you go along.

Step Two: Transfer the Pattern to Fabric Using the Light Method

The easiest way to transfer a design onto a light-color fabric is to trace it. Place the square paper pattern face down onto the center of the square fabric and secure with washi tape or pins. Flip over and use a light table or my favorite tool, the Crayola Light-Up Tracing Pad, to transfer the pattern to the fabric using a fine lead pencil or nonpermanent fabric marking pen. You can also tape your fabric/design to a sunny window and use the natural light to trace.

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Step Three: Prepare the Fabric & Floss

Place the fabric into your embroidery hoop making sure the design is centered. To make your fabric taut, spread it over the smaller inside hoop and fit the larger outside hoop over the top with your fabric in between. Tighten the little screw on the outer hoop and gently pull on the edges of the fabric until you have a taut surface to work with.

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Threading your needle:

Threading the needle can be a little tricky, especially when using all six plies of floss. It may help to slightly dampen your finger and twist the end of the thread into a point, or try squeezing the floss ends flat between your thumb and forefinger. Then slide the needle’s eye onto the floss (instead of pushing the floss through the eye). If all else fails, use a needle threader.

Once you’ve threaded your needle, knot the longer end of the floss by first wrapping it around your finger, then roll it off and tighten into a knot.

Video Link: How To Tie A Knot For Hand Sewing

Step Four: Stitching the Design

running-stitch

1. Running Stitch: To begin stitching the Heart Sampler, let’s start with the most basic embroidery stitch- the Running Stitch. Begin at the center dashed line of the heart pattern. Starting at the bottom, pull the threaded needle to the front of the fabric at A (see photo above). Then return to the back of the fabric at B. The distance from A to B can be as long or short as you want. For this project, I recommend making small, even stitches of equal length. End your last stitch so that your needle is to the back of the fabric and tie off.

Video Link: Running Stitch

Tying off:

On your last stitch, return the needle to the back of the fabric. To tie off, pass the needle under a previous stitch creating a loop. Bring the needle back through the floss loop, and tighten. I recommend pulling the thread gently when tying off to ensure that the knot ends up snuggly next to your fabric (and not half an inch away). Avoid yanking the floss.

Video link: How to tie off a stitch

Embroidery Tip!

Your thread will get twisted up as you make your stitches. To correct this problem, hold up the hoop and let the needle and floss dangle straight down so that the strand can untwist itself. Just make sure not to lose your needle!

back-stitch

2. Back Stitch: Move over to the next line on the pattern (from the middle running stitch). Starting at the bottom of the pattern, bring your needle through to the front of the fabric at A (see photo above). Then go backwards and return your needle to the back of your fabric at B. Next your going to move your needle forward, coming up at C. Repeat this process to create consecutive back stitches by once again working backwards, poking your needle through at the end of the previous stitch, then moving your needle forward. Be sure to make small, even stitches of equal length. Once you reach the end of the line (of the pattern), tie off.

Video Link: Back Stitch

cross-stitch

3. Cross Stitch: Next we are going to try our first decorative stitch! Starting at the bottom of your pattern, bring your needle through to the front of the fabric at A and then back down again at B (creating a diagonal straight stitch). Next make a second stitch from C to D. Make sure each cross (x) overlap is in the same direction. Once you finish your row and tie off, notice what the back or your stitches look like. The back of a Cross Stitch row should look like the image shown.

Video Link: Cross Stitch

threaded-running-stitch

4. Threaded Running Stitch: First make a line of small close Running Stitches. End the floss. Start a second floss strand (in a different color) at the same spot as the first line of running stitches, bringing your needle to the front of your fabric at A. Working on the front only, without stitching through the fabric, insert the needle under the first Running Stitch, then through the second Running Stitch. Continue weaving back and forth under the Running Stitches until you reach the end of the line. End floss and tie off.

Video Link: Threaded Running Stitch (Warning: This video is not in English, but her demonstration of the stitch is all you really need).

chain-stitch

5. Chain Stitch: Start again at the bottom of the pattern and move your way up. Bring the threaded needle to the front at A. Insert the needle back into the fabric at A and then just poke the needle back up to the front at B. Loop the thread under the needle point then pull the thread through to create your first chain. Begin the next stitch in the same way by inserting the needle back into the fabric at B (now under the loop), coming up at C (outside the loop). Bring the thread around and under the needle point and pull the thread through. On your last stitch, end the chain by inserting your needle into the end of the last chain (outside the loop). Pull the thread through to the back and tie off.

Video link: Chain Stitch

fern-stitch

6. Fern Stitch: Fern Stitch consists of three Straight Stitches of equal length radiating from the same central point A. Starting at the top of the pattern and moving your way down, bring the thread through at A and then make a Straight Stitch to B. Bring the thread back through again at point A and make another Straight Stitch to C. Bring the thread back through at point A (for the final time) and make a final straight stitch to D. Repeat this pattern by moving the needle down and coming up through the next center stitch to begin the next three radiating stitches. The center stitch follows the light of the pattern design.

Video Link: Fern Stitch (Note: This demonstration is done differently than described above. Either method works!)

star-stitch

7. Star Stitch: This is an Eight Point Star Stitch. Begin by first making a basic cross stitch. Then make another cross stitch diagonally on top of the first one to form a star.

Video Link: Star Stitch

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Step Five: Finishing for Display

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Once finished, turn your embroidery sampler to the back and take a look. My grandma always said that the back of your embroidery project should look just as neat and tidy as the front! But don’t worry. It’s OK is yours doesn’t look so tidy, since no one is meant to see the back of your project anyway (unless you show your grandma and she wants to check your stitches lol).

You can now prep your project for display. If you plan to make your heart sampler into a pillow, for example, you can remove it from the hoop and move on to your sewing machine. Or you can leave it as ‘Hoop Art’ by using the embroidery hoop as a frame for the project. To do this, make sure your Heart Sampler is centered in the hoop and the fabric is nice and taut. Then use sewing scissors to cut away the excess fabric.

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February DIY Challenge Results!

We are so excited to share the great submissions we received for this month’s DIY Challenge! The theme for this month was ‘Hearts’ and we were blown away by the creative projects everyone came up with. As promised we are awarding our three favorite projects and showcasing everyone’s submissions.

DIY Challenge Award: Most Heartening

These crochet heart pins made by Margaret Temari are just darling! Margaret is a single mom of 4 and a school district nurse living in suburban Chicago. Her favorite hobbies (modes of stress relief) are cross-stitch and crochet.

I share office space with 4 coworkers and we’re always leaving little gifts for each other. All of us are crafty so we appreciate handcrafted items. I wanted a valentines gift that was personal but affordable. So I crocheted pins to wear. The timing coincided with a fundraiser we were doing with the American heart association! – Margaret Temari

February DIY Challenge Results

DIY Challenge Award: Most Lovely

The award for “Most Lovely” goes to Donna Herron. We are head over heals for her Love Letter Keychain made from polymer clay. Donna is originally from New England and enjoys making things that use various materials and lots of color. Check out her tutorial on how to make this lovely Love Letter Pendant on her blog!

I love playing around with polymer clay and this project is very easy. It really only takes a little bit of clay, and some basic tools that are probably lying around most folks homes. And it’s easy to personalize these “love letters” for any recipient with the addition of a special saying or decoration. – Donna Herron

February DIY Challenge Results #hearts #diycraftchallenge #adventuresinmaking

DIY Challenge Award: Most Adorable

These heart sachets made by Rute Caldiera are just darling! She calls them Anti-Moth Sachets, filling them with herbs to protect her clothing. Rute is a single mom from Portugal. Be sure to visit her blog, Heartland.

February DIY Challenge Results #hearts #diycraftchallenge #adventuresinmaking

While looking for a natural (as much as possible) solution to protect clothing during winter time, a friend of mine who knows a lot about herbs came out with this simple solution: bay leaves, cinnamon, cloves and rosemary. I added rice, to keep the herbs dry. These Heart Sachets smell like nature, no too intensly and have proven to be effective. – Rute Caldiera

Hearts Gallery

February DIY Challenge Results #hearts #diycraftchallenge #adventuresinmaking

Credits

1. Tangle Love Wreath by Shellie Wilson
2. Heart Pancakes by Aterno from Australia.
3. Anniversary Wall Art by Donna Heron
4. Sweetgum Heart Wreath by Daniele Anderson Stringer from Long Island, NY.
5. Pipe Cleaner Heart Garland by Daniele Anderson Stringer from Long Island, NY.
6. My Heart Belongs 2 U Wall Art by Judith Laguerre from Teaneck, NJ.
7. Celtic Heart Knot Garland by Sarah Nenni-Daher from Seattle, WA.
8. Rainbow Origami Hearts Bouquet by Sarah Nenni-Daher from Seattle, WA.
9. Jar of Hearts Art by Clemencia R. from Ecuador.
10. Watercolor Heart by Clemencia R. from Ecuador.
11. DIY Heart Stamps by Alison Lang from Issaquah, WA.
12. Heart Door Wreath by Helen Lebert from Clayton, CA.
13. Watercolor Heart Galaxy Art by Rachel Beyer from Portland, OR.
14. Prayer Hearts by Keisha Pittman from Arkansas.

Thank you for participating in the February DIY Challenge! For those of you who wished they could have joined in the fun, never fear! Our March DIY Challenge begins on Monday!

Happy Friday – Rachel & Alison

TODAY: Have a Happy Little Valentine’s Day!

love2680Put your heart into doing something crafty today, and be sure to snap a picture and share it with us!

february-diy-challengeSend us photos of your handmade valentines, crafts and treats! Hearts are the theme for this month’s DIY Challenge and we invite you to join in the fun. Submit your project for a chance to win a special award and handmade felt badge! The last day to submit is February 26th. We’ll showcase everyone’s projects on February 27th. Happy crafting! ♥

DIY: Valentine Pocket with Printable Template

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Like I mentioned before, Valentine’s Day gets me pretty sappy. Sappy enough that all I wanted to do the other day was make a tiny Valentine Pocket to hide secret messages in.

I know. I know.

Well, I did it anyway, and put together a template and tutorial so you can make pockets of your very own, to decorate with all those heart stamps you made.

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Supplies

• Scissors
• Glue or gluestick
• Pens, pencils, markers, stamps, and anything else you’d like to decorate with
• The template below, printed (preferably on cardstock but regular weight paper will work.)

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It’s easier to decorate the pockets before you cut them out, so go crazy. I used all the heart stamps I made the day before, and every valentiney color. The more coverage you get on the pocket itself, the better they look (I think.)

IMG_6008When you’ve finished decorating, all you have to do is…

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Cut out the pocket template…

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fold along the dotted (hearted) lines, fold in & add glue to the striped flaps, and press the back of the pocket down.

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The back of the pocket, after the flaps have been glued in.

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Then you can write your secret message, and slip it into the Valentine Pocket

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and get started on the next dozen!

Bonus- The pockets are the perfect size for a business card, in case you want to do a slightly more professional version of the pocket. (I don’t know. Maybe?)
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I’d love to see what you do with yours!

DIY: Heart Stamps from Stuff your already have.

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Creativity isn’t always about going to the craft store and stocking up on the newest trendy supply- sometimes it’s about getting clever with what I already have. I save money (by using the things I have and might otherwise throw away), save time (by avoiding a shopping run), and tickle that part of my brain that adores a challenge.

Fortunately, I have a LOT of random supplies, so I get to experiment.

Since the DIY Craft Challenge theme this month is hearts, I decided to sit down and make an assortment of heart stamps using different techniques and supplies. I hope they will inspire you to put your heart making skills to work!

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Supplies to Gather Up

• Scissors
• Carving tools like these from Speedball
• Craft Knife
• Permanent Marker
• Pencils, with new erasers
• Stamp Pads
• Washable Markers
• Glue/Gluestick
• Wine Corks
• Sheets of Craft Foam
• Large Flat Eraser (or Speedy-Carve Carving Block)

Stamp 1: Scissors, Glue, Craft Foam, Stamp Pad

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This was simply the easiest, quickest, and most surprisingly amazing stamp I made. If you’ve got some craft foam and a pair of scissors you should make a million. First I cut out a square of foam the same size as the flat top of the stamp pad. I then free-hand cut a heart out of that square, and glued it onto the top of the pad with a glue stick. Now all I have to do is take the lid off the stamp pad, tap it on the ink, and print. I love the way it stamps!
(Inspired by the gift wrap experiment.)

Stamp 2 : Flat Eraser, Scissors, Marker, Stamp Pad

IMG_6108IMG_5977It takes a little effort to make this one work with scissors (a craft knife would be easier) but it prints beautifully. I drew a heart shape on the eraser with a marker, then cut around the stamp until I had just the heart shape. Then dabbled it in a stamp pad.

Stamp 3: Pencil (with fresh eraser), Marker, Carving Tools, Stamp Pad

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This one get the award for the most adorable. I drew a tiny heart on the eraser of the pencil, then carved around it to leave just the heart shape standing out, then stamped that in a stamp pad.
(Similar tutorial here.)

Stamp 4: Flat Eraser, Carving Tools, and Washable Markers

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This is definitely the most compact and kid friendly, since you can use the marker instead of a stamp pad. First I cut a small piece circle of eraser and shoved it into the end of the marker. Then I drew a heart shape on it and carved out the material around the heart. Once the shape is all cut out, I used the marker itself instead of a stamp pad, by coloring on the heart and stamping away.
(These stamps used the same technique at my tiny bug marker stamps, and you can find an extended tutorial here.)

Stamp 5: Craft Knife, Cork, Marker, Stamp Pad

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Although this little stamp get pretty rustic, I think that it is the prettiest. First I drew a heart on the wine end of the cork (the other side had a hole from the corkscrew) then I traced the heart with my knife, before cutting about 1/8 of an inch all the way around the cork. It took some back and forth between those two steps, but eventually I had a raised heart, all ready to stamp.
(Check out this even simpler version.)

See! Five heart stamps without even pulling out a potato or a sponge.

So what now? Check back tomorrow for a Valentine template that will put those stamps to good use!

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Three Valentine’s Day Dinner Menus

I love any excuse to cook up a fancy dinner (or better yet, have my guy cook a fancy dinner). We both love to cook, especially together, so this year we are planning a Valentine’s Day feast. Creating menus is just the first step to a night of homemade bliss. Here are three menu ideas: a fun and friendly pizza night, a fancy date-night dinner, and an epic brunch-for-dinner.

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Sinful Valentine’s Day Pizza Night

Sweetheart salad with beet hearts, goat cheese and walnuts
Homemade heart-shape pizza
Lobster mac and cheese
Frosted Chocolate fudge brownies
Italian cream soda

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Heavenly Valentine’s Day Date Night

Clams in chardonnay saffron mint broth
Queen of tomato tarts
Linguini with almonds, broccoli, mussels, pepper and pecorino
Strawberry balsamic chutney and goat cheese bruschetta
Sparkling strawberry rosé sangria

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Epic Valentine’s Day Brunch-For-Dinner

Lazy strawberry cinnamon rolls
Sweetheart citrus salad with cinnamon maple syrup
Heart-shaped bacon
Asparagus and ham eggs benedict
Strawberry grapefruit mimosa

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink
I’ve had my eye out for something special to make for Valentine’s Day this year. When I spotted this recipe for Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies I couldn’t resist giving it a try. Not only are these cookies PINK but they’re also strawberry flavored and have a white chocolate center!

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink

These cookies are another spend-all-afternoon-in-the-kitchen type of dessert, which I don’t mind as long as I can take my time and enjoy the process. In an electric mixer, beat together butter and sugar. Using a separate bowl, combine the egg with the strawberry and vanilla extracts. Beat together then pour into the butter/sugar mix. Mix well.

Sift together the flour, baking powder and salt in a separate bowl. Slowly add it, ½ cup at a time, to the mixer until fully combined. Now you should have a nice dough. It shouldn’t be too sticky, so add more flour if it sticks to your finger when pressing into it.

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink

Roll the dough out into a log, and then cut it into three sections. Roll each section into a ball then poke your fingers in to create a small hole. Add your gel coloring a little at a time until you achieve a color you like. I chose three different shades of pink. Wrap each ball in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for about 1 hour.

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink

Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line a baking sheet with parchment. Roll the dough into approx. 1.5” balls, then press a candy melt into the center of each ball. Next roll them back up into balls (with the candy melt inside).

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink
RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink

Pour your various pink sprinkles into small bowls and coat each ball with a good layer, then place it back onto the baking sheet. Once all the balls are sprinkled, use the bottom of a pint glass to press the cookies down into a round disk.

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink
RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink

Bake at 350 degrees for 9 minutes. Transfer to wire racks to cool. Makes approx. 2-dozen.

strawberry-sprinkle-cookie-6

5.0 from 1 reviews
Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Dessert
Serves: 2 dozen
Ingredients
  • 2 sticks of unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 ½ cup powdered sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tsp strawberry flavor
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 ¾ cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • Pink gel coloring
  • Pink sprinkles
  • White candy melts
Instructions
  1. In an electric mixer, beat together butter and sugar. Using a separate bowl, combine the egg with the strawberry and vanilla extracts. Beat together then pour into the butter/sugar mix. Mix well.
  2. Sift together the flour, baking powder and salt in a separate bowl. Slowly add it, ½ cup at a time, to the mixer until fully combined. Now you should have a nice dough. It shouldn’t be too sticky, so add more flour if it sticks to your finger when pressing it.
  3. Roll the dough out into a log, and then cut it into three sections. Roll each section into a ball then poke your fingers in to create a small hole. Add your gel coloring a little at a time until you achieve a color you like. I chose three different shades of pink. Wrap each ball in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for about 1 hour.
  4. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line a baking sheet with parchment. Roll the dough into approx. 1.5” balls, then press a candy melt into the center of each ball. Next roll them back up into balls (with the candy melt inside).
  5. Pour your various pink sprinkles into small bowls and coat each ball with a good layer, then place it back onto the baking sheet. Once all the balls are sprinkled, use the bottom of a pint glass to press the cookies down into a round disk.
  6. Bake at 350 degrees for 9 minutes. Transfer to wire racks to cool. Makes approx. 2-dozen.

 

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink

These cookies are so pretty, they’d make a wonderful gift for Valentine’s Day! Stack them up inside a wide mouth mason jar and decorate with a pretty ribbon and gift tag.

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink

Labels and gift tags courtesy of Evermine.com.

DIY: Robot Valentine’s Day Cards with Tam Hess

DIY: Robot Valentine Cards with Tam Hess
Please welcome guest blogger Tam Hess! Today she is sharing a fun tutorial on how to make a robot valentine using one of her own digital stamps. You can read more about Tam and the cute things she makes in her Featured Maker interview.

Working with digital stamps is so much fun! I made this easy Robot Valentine card with a free digital stamp designed by me. There are tons of cute free and low cost digital stamps online. Downloading digital stamps and keeping them on your computer saves time and space. As soon as I discovered this idea I fell in love and started designing my own. I’m particularly biased and love this robot digital stamp… well, because I created him!

Step One: Gather your supplies

The first step for designing your robot valentine card is to gather your supplies. Find fun papers, ribbon, embossing folders, punches, pens, pencils and paints. Anything you would like to use for your card. I especially love watercolors so I will get all my watercolor supplies out for some fun.

Step Two: Download and print your digital stamp

Download the robot digital stamp for free from my website. Then print it out on either 72lbs watercolor paper for watercoloring or card stock paper for pencils and pens.

DIY: Robot Valentine Cards with Tam Hess

I like to size/format my digital stamps to be 3.5” x 2.5” and print them out four at a time. If you download Card Making Artists free digital stamps, I always include a digital stamp PDF sized/formatted just right for handmade cards.

Step Three: Color your robot

Use watercolors, pens, pencils or paints to color your robots any way you like. Have fun trying different color combinations.

Step Four: Cut out the image

Start cutting the robot image. I use the gray border line around the robot image as a guide for cutting out the digital stamp. You can use scissors, which I normally use but the cutting board works well too.

DIY: Robot Valentine Cards with Tam Hess

After getting all the robots painted and cut out, I start looking through my stash of papers and embellishments to find the ones that match the robots. Yes, I will gather some supplies before I start my project but usually I have to jump up a million times to find just the right colored paper or embellishments. Once I get all the robots matched to papers and card folders it’s time to decide on a design.

DIY: Robot Valentine Cards with Tam Hess

Step Five: Design your card

Finding the right design for your card can be tricky. I really get stumped on card designs. Usually I will find a “card sketch” online that I refer to. “Card sketches” are like templates to follow for card making. You can find “card sketches” on card challenge sites like Retro Sketches, which is my favorite card making challenge site. When you use a digital stamp like the Valentine Robot stamp, you can keep your design and embellishments to a minimum. If you need something smaller or don’t like the sentiment, I included in your download a PNG (Portable Network Graphic) version of your digital stamp. You can resize your PNG Valentine Robot to any size you like!

DIY: Robot Valentine Cards with Tam Hess

The robot digital stamp is large and is the focal point of the card so there’s no need to go overboard with the embellishing. However, I love the super busy over the top cards with all kinds of embellishments, the cards that look like they wouldn’t fit in an envelope? Awesome!

DIY: Robot Valentine Cards with Tam Hess

I need more card making practice to design one of those super embellished cards. Handmade cards are a fun and easy way to express yourself. People are always excited and impressed to receive something that you’ve made. The lazy part of me especially likes having a bunch of handmade cards ready for quick birthday and thank you greetings. If you’re super organized, keep a few gift cards on hand and then you’re really set! You can visit CardMakingArtists.com for more card making fun, ideas and free digital stamps.

DIY: Robot Valentine Cards with Tam Hess