DIY: Marble Paper with Oil Paints

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Whenever Rachel and I get together there is always a lot of making. We hang out, paint, draw, and then we party (ie: DIY TIMES). In anticipation for this visit, we made lists of possible crafts, and “Paper Marbling” appeared on both lists. Done!

We’d seem several methods, but we had almost all the supplies to marble with oil paints so we decided to try that out first. It was a long, fun day; full of “oooooh” and “aaaaahhh,” sunshine, and turpentine fumes. We wanted to share our method and tips with you, so that you can make your own marble marvel.

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Basic Supplies

  • Oil Paint Colors – cheap oil paints should work just fine, we used the M. Graham paints we had on hand.
  • Turpentine – Easily found at a hardware store.
  • Big plastic bin to float the paint in
  • Small containers to mix paint colors and turpentine
  • Cardstock (We loved the colored card stock best!)
  • Disposable bamboo skewers or spoons for stirring
  • Nitrile Gloves

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Step 1: Prep

Before we got started we made a comb by taping toothpicks into a small strip of card stock. The comb was handy for pulling through the colors, and encouraging more “swirly bits.”

We set up our marbling table outside, which I recommend highly. You want to use a table or cover that it’s okay to get paint on. This is a messy craft, to be sure. We set out a tarp for drying our finished papers, put on our gloves and starting mixing things up.

We filled two plastic bins with about an inch or water and set them aside. Then we put out several colors of oil paints in our mixing containers.

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It was a little trick to get the right mix of turpentine and paint, initially. We discovered that the ideal texture was somewhere around the thickness of whole milk.

marbledpaper_IMG_0740We added turpentine to the paint containers in small pours, and mixed it thoroughly with a bamboo skewer. If we needed to add more turpentine we did it as soon as we had the paint mixed to a consistent texture.

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Step 2: Pouring the Paint

Then we just poured the paints on top of the water! Simple. Sometimes we did little drops, sometimes we just chunked it all in.

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Our first batch of color was always full of the same color family, so that as the colors mixed in the water we didn’t end up with a bunch of brown paper. (Towards the end we got a little more daring, and had great results adding in complementary colors to the batches.)

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We got a lot of mileage out of our toothpick combs, pulling them through the paint to swirl the colors together.

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Step 3: Dipping the Papers

Once we were happy with a design, we laid the card stock quickly on top of the swirled colors, and removed it as delicately as we could. (Rachel had a great dunking method that involved bending the card stock down the middle– hamburger style– then rolling down from the middle to the outside edges before lifting from the water.)

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Tada! It was amazing how unpredictable the results were. What you saw on the water might not be at all what showed up on the paper. We loved the look we got towards the end, when there was less paint and it all seemed to be thinner.

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We did two different color stories, one was reds and golds and one was blues and greens. The reds tended to get a little “gory” at times, but looked beautiful on colored papers.

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Step 4: Drying and Future Projects with Marbly Goodness

We laid the paged out for a few hours, while we cleaned all the paint up. When we were ready to go inside we stacked the sheets and set them aside to dry. It took a good 5 days for the oil to be dry to the touch, but now they are, and I have all kinds of ideas about what to do with my collection.

Maybe I’ll revisit an old DIY, what do you think?

The possibilities are endless. I’m okay with that.

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Things We Learned

  • Working outside is key. The Turpentine is kinda smelly, and even with a light breeze we felt like we were standing in the fumes. Working outside also made cleanup a lot easier, with a big trash can and a hose available. Make sure to dispose of turpentine properly!
  • Initially we tried thinning the oil paint with walnut oil, but it did not allow the paint to spread out across the water. We had to drop everything and head to the store for turpentine to make the project come together. I have seen a couple of recommendations online for turpentine alternatives, but we didn’t try any (after the oil fiasco.)
  • If your paint drops to the bottom instead of floating, add a little more turpentine.
  • Sometimes less paint is better. I loved the last sheets we printed from each batch.
  • Opaque paint on black paper is tres cool.
  • Each sheet is cooler than the last, which means you won’t ever want to stop. Ever.

DIY: Culinary Herb Wreath

DIY: Culinary Herb Wreath

Herb gardening has become one of my favorite hobbies and this year I’m growing over 25 different types of herbs! There’s nothing better than a backyard garden full of fragrant edible plants. Now that it’s harvest season I’ve been researching ways to use them. I mainly use fresh herbs in cooking. Last year I made up a batch of yummy oregano pesto. I plan to make my own herbal vinegar and infused olive oils this year, but first I wanted to try something completely new- I made a gorgeous culinary herb wreath!

Not only was it fun choosing and harvesting the herbs I chose to use in my wreath, I also love that once the wreath has dried it becomes both decorative and functional. Find a spot in your kitchen (near the stove) to hang an herb wreath and all you have to do is snip off a few sprigs here and there to add to your cooking!

DIY: Culinary Herb Wreath

Read the Tutorial

You can find the full tutorial and make your own herb wreath by visiting my guest post over at Garden Therapy!

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party

In my last post, I mentioned that my 31st birthday is coming up and I am planning to celebrate by hosting a Bloody Mary themed party. I’ve been craving a good Bloody Mary ever since we got hit with our first heat wave in Portland. It felt too hot to cook or really eat much in 95+ degree heat and a cold Bloody Mary with all the fixings sounded like the perfect dinner on a hot summer night. (Un)lucky for me, the weather forecast for this coming weekend says the heat will be back on with another 97 degree high so I guess I’ll finally get exactly what I’ve been craving.

In preparation for the party I decided to infuse some vodkas. I chose two recipes, a special Bloody Mary Infusion (think garlic) and Bacon Habanero (think spicy).

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party

5.0 from 1 reviews
Bloody Mary Infused Vodka
 
Author:
Recipe type: Cocktail
Ingredients
  • • Garlic, crushed
  • • Tomato, sliced
  • • Olives
  • • Bell Pepper, halved
  • • Cilantro
  • • Dill
  • • Vodka
Instructions
  1. Fill a large mason jar with garlic, tomato, bell pepper, olives and herbs. I filled my jar about ⅓-1/2 of the way. Next add the vodka, filling the jar. Allow to infuse in the refrigerator for at least three days (I infused for a full week). Strain and discard the veggies, then pour infused vodka back into a clean jar or bottle.

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party

The Bloody Mary Infusion can be made up any way you want so feel free to try different combinations. Other ingredients to consider adding are: celery, cucumber, jalapeño, peppercorns. Now on to the bacon….

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party

5.0 from 1 reviews
Bacon Habanero Infused Vodka
 
Author:
Recipe type: Cocktail
Ingredients
  • 6 slices pepper bacon, cooked
  • 3 habanero peppers, halved and seeded
  • 2 serrano peppers, halved and seeded
  • Vodka
Instructions
  1. Place bacon and peppers in a large mason jar and cover with vodka, filling the jar. Let infuse in the refrigerator for up to one week. Give it a taste test after 3-4 days. The longer it infuses the spicier it will become.

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party

DIY: Convertible Harvest Apron / Produce Bag

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There’re still a million and a half things to do around here, but the garden has been calling. (Literally. The robins are LOUD.)

More often than not I find myself walking around with a hose and eating vegetables right off the plants like an animal; but the harvests are getting to be too big for me to eat immediately, too unwieldy to juggle in my hands, and while my first instinct is to bundle them up in my skirt I’m not too excited about flashing the neighbors.

All of this to explain why I decided to turn a half a yard of cotton material and some bias tape into a harvest apron- not just an apron, but an apron that converts to a drawstring produce bag.

For those of you who like to reverse engineer projects (and improve them!) the concept is simple. It’s a rectangular drawstring bag with one string that’s large enough to tie around your waist. For the rest of you who want to see what I did, follow along!

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Supplies

• 1/2 yard of printed cotton fabric. (18 inches x 45 inches wide, typically.)
• At least 3 yards of a durable, sewable trim to use as a drawstring and tie. I used Double Wide Bias Tape from Wrights.
• Sewing machine (or a needle and thread if you’re handy)
• Complementary thread and bobbin
• Ruler
• Straight pens
• Fabric Scissors
• Pinking Shears (optional).

Tips

• Remember to take it slow, and maybe start with a piece of material that you’re not in love with. The second one will go faster/easier.
• This project will hide a bunch of mistakes, so don’t fret!
• I used pinking shears to keep my edges from fraying. If you prefer, you can ignore all the steps that use the pinking shears and instead do a zig zag stitch down the fraying edge of the material. (This post on Craftsy is quite helpful.)
• Whenever you get to the end of a line of stitches, always go backwards and forwards on the spot with a few stitches to tie off the ends.
• A seam ripper is always useful if you’re as prone to mistakes as I am.
• An iron is also useful, if you have one handy. I use it to iron fabric flat, to fold seams over, and sometime I just push the steam button to listen to the hiss.

Step 1 – Making the Pocket

To begin, you will cut or tear the 18″x45″ piece of material down the fold so that you have two pieces of 18″x22.5″. You will be stitching the edges to form something almost like a pillow case, leaving one of the 22.5″ sides open (this will be the top of your pocket.) To remind myself which way went up, I used the pinking shears to trim one of the 22.5″ sides of each piece of material.

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Lay the two pieces together, with the right sides in. From your pinked “top” measure down 3 inches and put a bright pin or mark to show that your stitches will end here. (Don’t stitch above the markers.)

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Now sew a straight stitch 1/2 inch starting at your marker and going down to the bottom of the bag, across the bottom, and back up the other side (stopping 3″ below the top of the bag.)

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Voila! Pocket made!

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Now trim the other sides with your pinking shears to stop fraying.

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Step 2 – Drawstring Casing

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This first step is a little finicky– the goal is to fold under the raw edge of the fabric so it’s out of the way of the drawstring casing. First, fold back your unstitched raw edge (the 3″  from the top on each side we skipped before) and pin flat. 

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Use a zig-zag or straight stitch to permanently pin down that edge on each edge of the flap (leaving the flaps open.  One side shown open below.)

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Now for the drawstring casing, itself. Fold each open flap backwards to make a 1.5″ hem. Pin each side separately so that the pocket remains open.

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Run a straight stitch around the bottom of each flap, about 0.5″ from the pinked edge.

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Then run a second straight stitch approximately 0.5″ from the top of each side. The space between those stitches is where the drawstring will run.

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Step 3 – Drawstrings and Ties

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Cut your drawstring material into the following 3 pieces:
• Apron Tie: Wrap the string around your waist, add 12-18″ to your measurement and cut.
• Short Drawstring: Measure one piece that is 24″ to act as your other drawstring.
• Wrist Loop: The final piece will be a loop that you can use around your wrist to hold open your apron. I used about 12″ for my loop, but you may want to make yours longer or shorter (or omit this step, if you want!)

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For your wrist loop, cross the ends, and stitch to the middle of one of the open sides. (Make sure to stick above or below the drawstring casing area.

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The side with your loop will now be the front of your apron. Use a large safety pin to feed the 24″ piece through the casing on this side. Repeat with the long piece, through the casing on the other side.

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Fold over and stitch each of the four ends to form a 1.5″ loop. If you have a trim that will fray at the ends, it’s a good idea to do a tight zig-zag here to limit the fray over time.

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To keep your short drawstring from disappearing into the casing, feed the long piece through the loops on each side.

Trim all your little threads, and you’re ready to harvest!

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Tie the long tie at your natural waist, and get into the garden!

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Use the wrist loop when you need to hold open the apron, but keep your hands free. (Especially handy when you’re picking tricky berries.)

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When you’re ready to go in, untie the apron and pull the drawstrings for an instant produce bag.

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When the bag gets just too dirty, throw it into the wash on hot. (Turn the bag inside out to get rid of those stubborn bits of dirt.)

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Things to Try

• Add a pocket for a garden knife or shears.
• Add vintage cotton trim to make it even more vintage-girly.
• Add a bib and neck strap – more pockets?

Any suggestions? Do you have a favorite garden project you’re rocking this summer?

RECIPE: Homemade Banana Bread

RECIPE: Homemade Banana Bread
I’ve felt the urge to bake these past few weeks, but haven’t brought myself to turn on the oven with our 90+ degree heat wave here in Portland. It’s finally starting to cool down (to the 80’s), so I decided I was finally ready to use up my over-ripe bananas and turn on the oven. The best time for baking during the summer is either early in the morning, or late at night (the ‘cool’ hours of summer). Since I’m more of a night owl, I decided to stay up late and bake a yummy loaf of banana bread while watching a movie. I have to say, the best part of late-night baking is waking up the next morning to a fresh slice of banana bread and coffee for breakfast!

RECIPE: Homemade Banana Bread

Homemade Banana Bread
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Recipe type: Breakfast
Serves: 8 servings
Ingredients
  • ½ cup unsalted butter, softened
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2-3 ripe bananas
  • 1½ cups flour (I used 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour + ½ cup all-purpose)
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • ½ cup walnuts, crushed or chopped
  • ¼ tsp nutmeg
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a small loaf pan and set aside.
  2. Using an electric mixer, cream together butter and sugar. Add in the eggs, beating well after each one. Then add the vanilla and bananas, beat until just combined.
  3. In a separate bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon and nutmeg. Use a whisk to stir well. Slowly pour flour mixture into the electric mixer and beat on low until combined. Stir in the walnuts.
  4. Pour batter into greased loaf pan and bake for 45-50 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

Enjoy with coffee or tea in the morning or as an afternoon snack. Yum!

RECIPE: Homemade Banana Bread

RECIPE: Mango Salsa With Garden Cilantro

RECIPE: Mango Salsa with Garden Cilantro #homegrown

Mango salsa is one of my all-time favorite dishes to make. Loading up a bowl of it with chips is one of my favorite summer-time meals. This year I planted some cilantro seeds in my garden and couldn’t wait to harvest it and try out a recipe from Doreen Shababy’s book, The Wild & Weedy Apothecary. Doreen’s book is a wonderful resource for any budding herbalist as it’s bursting with herbal recipes and remedies.

RECIPE: Mango Salsa with Garden Cilantro

About growing cilantro…

This was my second attempt at growing cilantro from seed. Cilantro can be a little tricky as it tends to bolt (spring up flowers) rather quickly, especially in hot weather. Cilantro thrives is cool, moist weather, so with our recent heat wave here in the Pacific Northwest there was nothing I could do to prevent my cilantro from sending up it’s long, spindly flowers. So instead of fretting over it, I just planting some new seeds to begin another crop.

Some growing tips:

– For a continuous crop all season long, plant cilantro seeds every two weeks.
– Plant in a container at least 18 inches wide and 8-10 inches deep.
– Follow the planting instructions on your seed packet. Seeds should germinate in 7-10 days.
– Place containers in full sun, or if you live in a hot climate, light shade.
– Harvest at least weekly to keep leaves coming.

RECIPE: Mango Salsa with Garden Cilantro

Now on to the salsa recipe. I made up a double batch so that I could take some to a friend’s birthday party and save some for myself 🙂

Mango Salsa With Garden Cilantro
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Appetizer
Cuisine: Mexican
Serves: Approx. 4 cups
Ingredients
  • 2 ripe mangos, ripe, coarsely chopped (about 3 cups)
  • 1 jalapeno pepper, minced (remove seeds if you like it mild)
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 small red onion, finely chopped
  • 3 scallions, sliced
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • Juice of 1 orange
  • Cayenne pepper, optional
  • Salt, optional
Instructions
  1. Peel and chop up the mangos (if you've never cut open a mango before, the pit is large, long and flat, so you basically cut around the pit). Combine all ingredients and refrigerate at least 30 minutes. Then taste and add a dash of cayenne and salt if needed.

RECIPE: Mango Salsa with Garden Cilantro

Serve this yummy salsa as an appetizer with chips, over fish or shrimp tacos, or even use it to garnish chicken dishes.

RECIPE: Mango Salsa with Garden Cilantro

TODAY: It’s time to take a break.

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The sun has been visiting, the plants are growing, and there’s change in the air.

If you know anything about my other venture, So There, you know that in a couple of weeks I’ll be closing our current brick-and-mortar shop. It’s been a whirlwind couple of years and I have big plans for the future; but right now all I want to do is spend a month getting to know myself again and spending quality time with my garden, my friends, and my kitties. The past two years I’ve been extremely guilty of “powering through” things.  I kept working through the loss of my grandfather, father, cat-friend, and through illness, injuries, and disappointments. I feel like this transitional time is the perfect chance to give myself time to work through everything.

It’s time to think and play.

I think as artists (professional and casual) we have a tendency to try to keep working, when what we should be doing is giving ourselves some time to process, think, and breathe. We can’t grow as people or as artists if we don’t take a moment to change our patterns and look at ourselves and our lives from a different viewpoint.
But we have to give ourselves permission to pause. Set down the knitting needles and paintbrushes, stop the plans and the sketches, and just be present. Breathe.
While it’s true that our work is powered by our emotions and experiences, we can’t fully process those experience without time and work. It makes sense to take regular breaks to improve your life and your art. It makes even more sense to take those breaks before you absolutely. have. to.

There’s a reason for those million clichés about taking a break.

With that in mind, Rachel and I have given ourselves permission to let the blog pause from time-to-time, and this start of summer is a wonderful time. We’ll be back and bushy-tailed in July with a brand-new Craft Challenge and lots of new ideas. It’s unlikely we can go totally cold-turkey, so make sure to keep an eye on our twitter and instagram feeds (#adventuresinmaking) for the occasional transmission and peeks into our June break.

 

See you soon!

DIY: Simple Flowers from Old T-Shirts + Free Templates


I’ve been in a major cleaning and organization mood, so most of my projects have been focused on “using up” materials I have around. One giant project used a bin full of old printed t-shirts (I’ll show you when I’m done!) and I ended up with so many colorful t-shirt scraps that I over-ran my rag box. I decided it was a perfect time to combine those scraps, and the May DIY Challenge theme to make some simple jersey flowers.

After playing with the fabric for a day or two, I came up with two basic flower-making methods that you can use to make a whole army of blossoms.

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Supplies

• T-Shirt or jersey scraps
• Fabric scissors and paper scissors
• Needle and thread
• These printed template files : Stitch & Draw-up Petal Template, Pinch & Piece Petal Template

Optional Extras

• Shredding scissors, or other decorative edging scissors
• Straight pins
• Buttons
• Felt for leaves and backing. I used wide grosgrain ribbon.
• Pin-backs, bobby pins, or other clips to attach to the back
• Fabric Paints, or floss, or other decorating tools.

The Stitch & Draw-up Method

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This is by far the quickest way I made flowers, and was also especially useful for adding details to the center of other flowers, or for making the smallest simplest bonus blooms to add to a flower bunch. The template includes two example petal shapes to play with, and a feathered shape that I used for a center detail. It works with basically any shape you want to use, though, so be sure to try your own ideas for rows of petals.

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Step One

Cut the template shape out of a piece of jersey. (This is from the arm of a t-shirt.)

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Then stitch a loose line starting close to one edge and ending close to the other.

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Step Two

Put a stitch through the end you started on, to pull it into a ring.

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Step Three

Pull both ends of the thread to gather the fabric into a round shape. Make sure the extra puckered fabric from below your stitch line if on one side of the flower.

Step Four

Take a couple more stitches through the puckered side of the flower (which will be the back side, tie your favorite knot, and cut the thread.

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Step Five

Flip the flower over and add a button or other decoration. You can also stitch a clip or pin to the back side.  I put a button in the center of this one by stitching through the middle of the bloom,

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and added a couple of leaf-shaped pieces and a piece of ribbon to the back, by stitching them through the back of the petal.

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Voila, a quick simple flower that I can use on a package, as a pin, or in my hair. (Or all of the above.)

The Pinch & Piece Method

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This method takes a little more work, but I loved the way it makes a fuller and more complicated flower shape. I’ve given you four petal shapes to try on the template– each with a different number of petals per flower– but you can try all sorts of shapes for different results.

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Step One

Cut the indicated number of petal pieces out of jersey material. For this flower, I also used the “Center Detail” piece from the other template page to create a fuzzy center for my flower (shown above in dark purple.)

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Step Two

Stitch a loose line across the middle of each the petal (shown as a dotted line on the template) starting close to one edge and ending close to the other.

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Put a stitch through the end you started on, and pull to gather the fabric.

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Step Three

Bend the petal piece in half, and put a stitch in the fold. Then do the same to each petal to connect them all together. Tighten them together, and tie a knot at the first petal.

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Step Four

Wrap your thread between each petal  section to draw the center together and fluff the petals out. Then stitch through the back of the flower, & tie off the thread using your favorite knot. For the center on this flower, I used the “Stitch and Draw-up” method on my dark purple center detail piece, and then sewed through it and the center of my bloom. I attached a leaf shape and a piece of ribbon to the back like my first flower, and used that to bobby pin it in my hair.

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I’ve started flipping through my flower books for inspiration, and I love the flexibility and the whimsy of using old t-shirts like this.

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Soft, sweet, flowers.

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Remember that if you do this or any other flower project, send us a picture to enter the May DIY Craft Challenge.

RECIPE: 5 Summer Recipes We Love

Even though September is right around the corner, it still feels like summer here in the Pacific Northwest (as I write this it is 91 degrees outside!), so I thought I’d share some of my favorite recipes of the summer. My boyfriend, James and I love cooking together and these have been some of our top favorites of the summer!

1. Zucchini, Feta, and Spinach Fritters with Garlic Tzatziki

These fritters are damn delicious and have been our favorite way to use up our garden zucchini. We’ve made these at least 3 times in the past few months. Serve them with homemade tabouli and hummus. YUM!
Recipe from Host The Toast Blog.

5 Summer Recipes We Love #adventuresinmaking

2. Sun-dried Tomato Cilantro Hummus

Speaking of hummus, we tried making this recipe with a jar of homegrown/sun-dried tomatoes and it was to die for! Serve with your favorite crackers, cucumbers and other veggies. Recipe from A Beautiful Mess.

5 Summer Recipes We Love #adventuresinmaking

3. Baked Coconut Shrimp with Pineapple Dipping Sauce

Coconut shrimp is one of our all-time favorite treats. We used to get them frozen from my grandma (who ordered them from Schwann’s), but they discontinued them. Now we make our own using this super easy recipe from The Girl Who Ate Everything.

5 Summer Recipes We Love #adventuresinmaking

4. Smashed Chickpea and Avocado Salad Sandwich

This is one of my favorite sandwiches to have for lunch. Avocados are my favorite food and this recipe is healthy, filling and delicious. Recipe from Two Peas & Their Pod.

5 Summer Recipes We Love #adventuresinmaking

5. Vietnamese Summer Rolls with Hoison-Peanut Dipping Sauce

Whenever it’s too hot to cook, we make salad rolls. I love this recipe with mango and avocado. Working with the rice papers is a little tricky, but with a little practice you’ll get the hang of it! Recipe from Inquiring Chef.

5 Summer Recipes We Love #adventuresinmaking

RECIPE: Summer Veggie Pizza

RECIPE: Summer Veggie Pizza #homemade #garden
Homemade pizza is often a weekly staple at my house. I found a dough recipe I love and can often find many combinations of toppings just by emptying our refrigerator. Every summer, I look forward to harvesting my garden vegetables for my favorite summer veggie pizza. Even though summer is usually the time of year that we wean ourselves from homemade pizza since it’s way to hot to turn on the oven, I eventually can’t resist baring the heat for a homegrown, homemade pizza.

The trick to my homemade pizza (aside from the garden harvest toppings) is the sauce. I use a combination of tomato paste, sriracha, and pesto. The combination is so dang delicious!

RECIPE: Summer Veggie Pizza #homemade #gardenNow, for the dough recipe, which I originally found in the book, The Bread Bible. I’ve used this recipe so many times I’ve got it memorized. It’s simple and delicious!

Basic Pizza Dough
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Bread
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 1 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 1 cup warm water
  • ½ cup semolina flour
  • 2 cups bread flour
  • 2 tablespoons garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon basil
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil (plus some extra)
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, combine yeast and warm water. Stir until combined. Set aside.
  2. Using a food processor and the blade attachment, combine semolina flour, bread flour, garlic powder and basil.
  3. Add 1 tablespoon flour and 1 teaspoon sugar to the yeast mixture. Stir until dissolved. Then add in 2 tablespoons olive oil.
  4. Turn the food processor on and slowly pour in the yeast mixture. Process until combined. Then switch to the paddle attachment and process a minute or two more.
  5. Rinse the same bowl from the yeast mixture and pour some olive oil in to coat the bowl. Use a spatula to move the dough from the food processor into the bowl. Cover with a towel and leave on countertop to rise (about 1½- 2 hours).

Once you’re dough has risen, now comes the fun part! First preheat your oven to 500 degrees (F). Then line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Using your hands, pick up the dough, stretch is slightly (you don’t need to do too much), then place it onto the parchment. Use your hands to press/stretch the dough out, covering the parchment.

RECIPE: Summer Veggie Pizza #homemade #garden
RECIPE: Summer Veggie Pizza #homemade #garden

Next use a spatula to spread a thin layer of tomato paste over the entire dough. Sprinkle on the sriracha and spread another layer of pesto on top. Then it’s time for the mozzeralla.

RECIPE: Summer Veggie Pizza #homemade #garden
RECIPE: Summer Veggie Pizza #homemade #garden

Slice up your garden veggies and top your pizza. I used zucchini, tomato, basil and onion from my garden. If using zucchini, I recommend slicing them thin, placing them on a paper towel lined plate, and popping them in the microwave for a few minutes. This way they cook slightly and release a little bit of their liquid before going on the pizza.
RECIPE: Summer Veggie Pizza #homemade #garden

Bake in the oven for 12 minutes. Then let cool, slice and enjoy!
RECIPE: Summer Veggie Pizza #homemade #garden
RECIPE: Summer Veggie Pizza #homemade #garden