DIY: Photo Album Pop-up Ornaments


Okay. I’ll admit it. I have possibly been making too many ornaments.

The floor is covered in little bits of paper, the ribbons are everywhere, and cat is oh so happy. (Happy and thus in the background of many of my photos.) I can’t help it. I’ve given myself over to the ornament bug, and even though I’ve told myself that these are ‘just this year’s ornaments’, I’m not sure I’ll have the self control to throw them all away.

I need a crafter help line… or maybe I can just spread the decoration disease and have you all join me in the madness. (*evil laughter*)

My sister recently handed over a large bag of family photos, and after the proper period of mortification I decided that I needed to do something with them. The best part about being in charge of photo projects is that you can include only adorable pictures of yourself, and edit out the slightly more awkward times.

I pulled together a selection of photos of family that yelled “HAPPY HOLIDAYS, Y’ALL!” Scanned and shrank them, then pulled out a few basic tools to turn the faces I love into ornaments I’ll cherish.

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SUPPLIES

  • Resized photos printed on medium-heavy weight paper
  • Extra colored paper or cardstock
  • Medium to large hole punches– any symmetrical shape will work, I used circles and ovals
  • Ribbon or string
  • Buttons, bells, or beads
  • Paper glue or adhesive

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To begin I punched my favorite people out of my favorite photos, and the same number of circles out of cardstock. Then I chose between 4 and 6 of my favorites, the same number of solid circles, and folded each in half– top to bottom.

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I chose a button than matched my cardstock, then cut about 16 inches of string and fed it through the button.

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I used my Scotch ATG gun to apply adhesive to each folded piece (glue works too).

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I attached each piece to the one before it in a stack, alternating photos and cardstock. (Make sure that you don’t accidentally glue your sister in upside-down. She wouldn’t like that. All photos should point the same way.)

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I laid the string and button across the spine of my stack (button on the bottom), added a little adhesive to one of the folded pieces, and attached the top and bottom piece to form a ball shape.

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Then I fed another button on above the ball, tied a knot, and fluffed open all the pages.

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I love how simple they look from far away, but each page is a memory of the holidays and of my family.

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I did a few variations, using different punches, and combining shapes on one ribbon; but they are all put together the same way which means I could spend more time remembering good times than obsessing over the process.


It also means it’s a great project for kids, who might get a thrill out of punching holes out of photos.
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and keeping them forever.

DIY: Quick and Easy Faux-Etched Letter Frame

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I love the look of etched glass, but I try not to use my dremel on anything too delicate. When I rediscovered this awesome Window Film I knew exactly the project I wanted to do.

Want to make you own?
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Supplies

• Etched Glass Window Film: The version linked here uses water to cling to glass, which makes it repositionable, removable, and amazing.
• A printout of the letter you want to use.
• Transfer paper (or any other means of getting the design on the backer)
• A craft knife
• A frame with glass or plexiglass

IMG_6655First cut off a small piece of the film, remove the backer, and set aside. Lay your letter template on top of the backer with a piece of transfer paper in the middle. Hold your stack firmly and trace all the way around the letter.

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When you have your design on the backer, reattach the film by smoothing it down with your thumbnail until it it well attached. Using the template lines you can see through the film, cut the design out carefully with a craft knife, then remove the backer.

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Follow the instructions included with your film to attach it to the frame’s glass. (I put a thin layer of water down on the glass, laid the letter down, and used my nail to smooth out all the bubbles.)

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Voila! Quick and easy “etched” decoration for your picture frame.

IMG_6692 IMG_6717What’re you doing with letters?

DIY: Make your own PhotoCorners + Printables

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Did you know you can make your own photo corners?

I got tired of using boring photo corners in my albums, and to secure my prints, so I came up with a way to make my own custom corners. I usually use a coordinating paper (sometimes decorated) to complement the photo or print. (For instance, I use the Square Flap Method in kraft paper to secure my prints to their backer board in the store. This keeps them safe, without having to use plastic sleeves on everything.)

There are a couple of different ways I make the corners depending on the print of the paper, and how I will be using them. I’ve included a little printable sheet with instructions (one to save and one to share). Click below to print your own.

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If you’re feeling adventurous, try both methods in a variety of sizes. Sometimes really big corners are a blast, and sometimes tiny ones are the way to go. Once you’re done with that…

Print your own captioned photo corners!

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I had so much fun putting together the box template last week, that I thought I’d make some printable corners for you to customize with your own captions. The template pages can be edited in Adobe Reader(available for free here) and have instructions for assembly. (Using the Square Flap Method.)

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All you’ll need to put them together is a pair of scissors and glue (or double-stick tape).
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Each template includes one illustrated and three patterned corners. Feel free to use as many as you like. (I find two work well for smaller photos, while larger photos stay in better with four.)

Click on the thumbnails below to open and save a template.  Then, simply open them in Adobe Reader (available for free here), click on the type to edit what each corner says, and print as many as you want!

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Well, I’m off to make a bunch of corners for my new set of prints. What are you up to today?