SHOW+TELL: Easy Tiered Cardboard Display

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Whenever I write a post about my favorite tools or methods I often get this wistful feeling; imagining someone inspired by the step-by-step instructions. I’m always so interested in figuring out how to use new tools, how to make everything myself– and I picture a couple of people taking some of my ideas and really making them their own. Changing up the steps, making use of their materials, and generally going crazy.

Viva creativity!

In the vacuum of cyberspace, I don’t get a chance to see too many examples of this, so while these little scenarios exist mainly in my brain, I thought I would share a simple display project inspired by my friend Tara (who LOVES spray paint), using the method from the box tutorial.

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I’ve been wanting a nice tiered display for my Doodleware glasses, and finally I decided to build one. It simply consists of two boxes and a back flap that I painted black…

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so that the etching detail can stand out.

Easy peasy, and basically free. It’s the perfect dimension to display the glasses in the cube I have available.

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Now it’s that much easier to find the letter you’re looking for!

If you’ve done one of our projects, we’d love to see your finished piece! Email us at hello@adventures-in-making.com to tell us how it went.

Have something you’re dying to know about! We love questions. Send them to us and we’ll see if we can figure it out!

DIY: Season’s Greetings Printable Herb Packet Gift

Season's Greetings Printable Herb Packet Gift Idea
I recently created this fun holiday printable idea for Garden Therapy and thought I would share it here on A.I.M for you to enjoy! -Rachel

Quick and easy holiday gifts are essential for surviving the holiday season. This free printable “Season’s Greetings” Herb Packet is perfect for small gifts and can easily fit into the mail with your holiday greeting cards! Use herbs harvested from your own garden to create flavorful seasoning mixes paired with a simple and delicious recipe.

CLICK HERE to for the full tutorial and free printable download over at Garden Therapy!

Season's Greetings Printable Herb Packet Gift Idea

DIY: Finger Crochet a Round T-shirt Rag Rug

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Despite my sister’s best efforts I’ve never been able to make sense of real crochet. The “finger crochet” method I describe below is something that came out of a lot of experimentation, but I’m guessing you fiber wizards could whip up something even better! If you’ve done a similar project, or have suggestions to make this DIY more clear, please feel free to tell us about it in the comments below.

When I finished re-weaving my t-shirt rug (updated photos at the bottom of that post) I figured out two important things.

  1. There is better way to cut a t-shirt into strips (fewer, longer strips.)
  2. Once you know how to cut t-shirts into long strips, no t-shirt is safe.

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Which translates to: I had a lot of leftover strips of jersey, and wanted to use them up! I started braiding, tying knots, and eventually settled on a method that can best be described as the frumpy cousin of crochet.

PREP: Cutting one long strip

Knotting small strips of jersey (demonstrated in the woven rug post) is time-consuming, so the longer the strip the better. After digging around a bit I found this video that shows how to turn a loop into one long strip.

IMG_2100_roundtshirtrugI started by cutting the large loop of the shirt from the top, and sliced across from one side, stopping about an inch from the other edge.


Then I slipped the loop over my arms, and starting at the end of one cut I cut diagonally towards the end of the next cut on the other side of the fabric. Then the whole thing unwound in a continuous strip.

MAKING THE RUG


To begin I tied a slip-knot near the end of the string by making a loop, reaching through and grabbing the strip, pulling it though and gently pulling to tighten. (There’s a great demonstration of a slip knot at the beginning of this video.)

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Then I reached through that loop, pinched the strip, and pulled it through to create my first chain stitch. (See steps 2 thru 4 on this Red Heart blog post). This whole project breaks down into pulling a new loop through an old loop.

I repeated this chain stitch about 5 times, then…


tucked the loose string end through the last chain stitch to loosely close the first set of chains into a circle.

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To connect the next ring of chains I pulled the next strip (navy) through two existing loops– the one I just made (pictured here closest to my thumb), and the inside of an earlier chain that lined up with my new one (closer to my fingertip).

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This way my newest loop connected my existing chain to the one inside of it. I then started a pattern of 3 chain stitches, 1 connecting stitch, 3 chain stitches, 1 connecting stitch, 3 chain stitches, 1 connecting stitch, 3 chain stitches, 1 connecting stitch, 3 chain stitches, 1 connecting stitch…

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going around and around the circle.

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When I ran out of strips, I pulled the end of my string through the last loop, and tucked it into the rug– because one day I will have more t-shirts to dismantle, and this rug will keep getting bigger!

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TIPS

  • As you are working, make sure not to pull your loops too tight, or stretch your chain when you’re doing a connecting stitch. The looser you work the flatter the rug will sit.
  • Different shirts will make thicker or thinner strings based on the thickness of their fabric. I opted for a very irregular look with lots of inconsistencies in my strips (width ranging from 1″ – 2″) but if you want a more regular look, stick with shirts of a similar weight, and cut your strips about 1.25″ wide.
  • If it’s looking weird, pull out your loops and start over! Once you get the hang of this version of finger crochet you’ll fly through this project, so you will quickly make up the time redoing it. Practice has never been more fun.
  • If you can, work for longish stretches to keep your tension consistent. This is a great “while watching tv or daydreaming” activity.
  • As always, plan to make one more rug than you have cats.

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DIY: Spookily Free and Easy Ghosts

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When I was a kid my mom came up with all sorts of awesome crafts for us to do, and being a typical goth-in-the-making I loved the halloween crafts most of all. One year we made cheesecloth ghosts with balloons and glue and it’s a project that has haunted me to this day.

I decided that I really wanted some ghost friends, but lacking balloons and cheesecloth I decided to make some up, Alison style. (IE: Free, Quick, and Fun.)

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SUPPLIES

  • At least a couple of feet of sheer or thin fabric – old sheets or window sheers work great!
  • All-purpose flour
  • Bottles: Soda, water, or wine. Glass or plastic.
  • Wire or wire coat hangers
  • Plastic bags
  • Rubber bands
  • Scissors
  • A bucket or bin to mix your flour paste in

Step 1: The Form

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To begin will make a simple armature out of wire (or out of a wire hanger). Cut a piece about 24″ long, and twist it together to form one big loop.

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Slip the loop over the neck of your bottle, and twist the arms slightly so that they sit securely on the bottle and point slightly upwards. Using a scrap piece of fabric or paper, form a ball shaped head over the neck of the bottle and secure it with a rubber band.

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To make the armature (form of the ghost) easier to remove, cover it with a plastic grocery bag, and secure it with a rubber band.

Measure the height of your ghost form from the base, across the head, and to the base on the back side. Cut a square of fabric this size to cover your form. (This is a great time to tear your fabric instead of cutting, if you want. Frayed edges are a bonus!)

 

Step 2: Stiffening and Forming the Fabric

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Although flour may not last forever when used as a paste, it works perfectly for a ghost that will only haunt your house for a year or two. Combine 4 parts water with 1 part all-purpose flour in a large container and mix well with your fingers. Soak your ghost fabric, and wring it gently.

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Spread the fabric over the ghost form, with a corner of the fabric pointing forwards.

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Using your creativity (and maybe a clip or two) shape the cloth as creepily as you want! (I loved adding a fold along the “hair line” so that it looked like my ghost was in a cloak.)

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If you’d like, remove some of the excess fabric from the “arms” of your ghost. (Make sure to leave fabric puddled at the front and back; this will ensure that your ghost will sit up when it’s all dry.)

Leave your new little friend to dry overnight, with a fan blowing if you can. When it’s completely dry, gently pull the bottle form out of the stiff fabric. (If it’s not firm enough to stand, you can mix up some more of the flour and water and paint it onto your fabric while it’s still on the form. You may want to use a higher ratio of flour to water.)

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Boo!

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If you’re feeling extra crafty, you can paint right on your ghosts with watercolor or acrylic paints. I have some scary plans for one of mine.

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Use What You’ve Got!

If you don’t have scraps of fabric lying around, this project is also fun with thin paper, tissue paper, or even paper towels. Just make one adjustment: instead of soaking the paper in your paste, lay the paper across your form and paint the paste on with your fingers or a craft paint brush. Saturate the paper slowly and let it fall again the form. You can add multiple layers of paper for more texture (like the tissue paper ghost above) and even cut out a mouth and eyes!

Stick an LED “candle” in it, and things get even creepier!

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Scary Ghost Sound!

What’s frightening you this season?

DIY: Glitter Pumpkin Candles

DIY: Glitter Pumpkin Candles  #autumn #fallcrafts

Fall is my absolute favorite time of year to make things. There’s something about the crisp autumn breeze that makes me want to spend an afternoon with a hot cup of tea and a craft project. I’ve been collecting small pumpkins for the past few weeks and drawing inspiration from this post by Hello Natural, I decided to make my own pumpkin candles.

DIY: Glitter Pumpkin Candles  #autumn #fallcrafts

Supplies Needed

• Small pumpkins
• Soy wax flakes
• #2 candle wick
• Wick tabs
• 30 drops clove essential oil (optional)
• Glitter

Additional Tools

• Carving knife
• Spoon
• Pliers
• Tin can (or double boiler)
• Popsicle stick
• Clothes pins
• Scissors

Cut the top off of each pumpkin and use a spoon to scrape out the insides.

DIY: Glitter Pumpkin Candles  #autumn #fallcrafts

Prep your wick with metal tabs (alternatively you could also use pre-tabbed wicks). Cut the wick to size and insert it through the metal tab with the end of of the wick lining up to the bottom of the tab. Use pliers to pinch the metal tab tightly around the wick. Place into the center of each pumpkin. Use a clothespin to hold the wick into place.

DIY: Glitter Pumpkin Candles  #autumn #fallcrafts

Using a double broiler, melt soy wax flakes over medium heat. Use a popsicle stick to stir the wax. Once completely melted, add the essential oil (optional).

DIY: Glitter Pumpkin Candles  #autumn #fallcrafts

Pour melted wax into the prepared pumpkins. Allow wax to dry almost completely, then sprinkle glitter over the top. Use a hairdryer to ‘hot top’ the glittered wax. The wax should remelt slightly and allow the glitter to set on the top. Allow to dry completely and trim wicks.

DIY: Glitter Pumpkin Candles  #autumn #fallcrafts

Simple as that! Now you can light them up and enjoy a hot cup of pumpkin spice.

DIY: Glitter Pumpkin Candles  #autumn #fallcrafts

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

As I continue my research and spend more time with the wonderful Indian/Asian spice, Turmeric, I love and learn more and more about it. Known in Sanskrit as the “Golden Goddess”, turmeric is often used in sacred Hindu ceremonies. Turmeric has been a staple in Indian food traditions for millennia and has at least 4,000 years of use in Ayurvedic, traditional Chinese, and Siddhic medicinal traditions. Ayurvedic practitioners believe that turmeric emanates the energy of the divine feminine and helps grant prosperity.

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

Health benefits of Turmeric

Turmeric comes from the root of the Curcuma Longa plant and is a member of the ginger family. It’s most known for it’s powerful anti-inflammatory properties, and is also a natural blood purifier, analgesic and antiseptic. The bioactive compound, Curcumin is what gives turmeric its bright yellow/orange color and is an effective topical antibacterial agent. It has stronger antioxidant properties than vitamin E, is anti-tumor, antibacterial and antimicrobial. It’s also known to assist in liver detox and has been used for centuries to promote healing of the gut, stomach and liver.

Note: Because it’s been found that turmeric is rapidly metabolized by the liver and intestines, its medicinal properties may not be as effective unless it is consumed with black pepper, which has been found to increase the absorption of curcumin by 2000%.

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

So, not only is turmeric a vibrant natural dye perfect for using this time of year, it has amazing health benefits too. How can you not love this spice!? Turmeric can be consumed dried, cooked, or raw, and has a slightly peppery, mildly bitter and earthy flavor. There are many ways to incorporate turmeric into your cooking and it can also be drank as a tea. A common method I found in my research is to make what’s called, Golden Milk. And to make it, you must first create a turmeric paste…

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

Turmeric Paste
 
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • ½ cup filtered water
  • ¼ cup ground turmeric
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
Instructions
  1. Combine ingredients in a small saucepan. Heat over medium high heat, stirring constantly until it forms a thick paste. Transfer paste into a small glass jar and store in the refrigerator until ready to use.

 

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

Once you’ve made your turmeric paste, you can make yourself up a warm cup of Golden Milk anytime you want!

Golden Milk
 
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 1 cup
Ingredients
  • 1 cup milk (dairy or nondairy)
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric paste
  • 1 teaspoon coconut oil
  • Honey or maple syrup (to taste)
  • Cinnamon or nutmeg (to taste)
Instructions
  1. Combine the milk, turmeric paste and coconut oil in a saucepan and heat over medium heat until it just starts to boil. Pour into a mug and sweeten with honey and a sprinkle of cinnamon.

 

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

DIY: No Sew Woven T-Shirt Rag Rug

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A couple of months ago I tore up the carpet in my office and replaced it with a wood-ish surface. It’s been great through these warm months, but I want something to stand on when the cold sneaks in. Couple that need with a stack of t-shirts left over from the quilt project, and you have my newest best friend, the t-shirt rag rug.

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I built a 30″x30″ make-shift loom out of a piece of plywood and scrap wood, but if you search online you can find frames built from pretty much anything. (A Beautiful Mess used cotton scraps and a big piece of cardboard. Also, Pinterest)

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I put nails along each end, 1 inch apart. Good hammer practice for a hammer novice.

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With the loom assembled, I moved to materials.

SUPPLIES

Stripping

The rug was built with 1.5″ loops for the warp (base strips) of my rug, and 1.75″ strips woven through.

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I used a large straight rotary blade and a metal ruler to cut three navy shirts into the 1.5″ loops, then cut the rest of the shirts into 1.75″ strips. (This is a very forgiving fabric, so estimation is ok!)

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I hooked the navy warp pieces on each side of the loom using the natural loop and stretch of the t-shirt.

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I prepared to weave by attaching the first strip to the first warp loop. I cut a slit in one end of the strip, fed the other end around the first warp piece and back through the slit. Then I pulled it tightly and began to weave.

Not a normal knot.

I connected a lot of strips to finish this rug using the method shown below. It’s quick and tidy, and ensured you don’t have a lot of extra bulk at your connection points.

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  1. Cut a small slit in the ends of each strip.
  2. Feed the new strip into the hole at the end of the other.
  3. Take the other end of the new strip and feed it through the slit on the same strip.
  4. Pull on the new end to tighten the knot. Smooth or trim extra material if needed.

(The video below shows how I knotted at the end of a strip.)

 

Now Weave!

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Starting at that first warp piece, I wove in and out of each loop to the end of the loom. At the end I wrapped either over or under the last piece to start back down the loom. The second strand went over the strands that the first went under, and vice versa.

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From there it was basically rinse and repeat. I wove back and forth, connecting strips and changing colors.

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When possible I fed the strip through the warp flat, then pulled it down with my fingers to bunch it up.

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The pattern and color combination were very important to me, and I got more and more excited as I worked on it. When I put the final strip in, I tied it off using a normal knot on the last piece of navy.

Finishing it off

Here’s where I admit this rug is really just a gigantic pot holder, and I finished it off the same way. I pulled the first warp loop free and fed the second through it, then fed the third through that one, and so on down the line. (Video Below)

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Once I was down to the last two loops, I changed tactics. I cut the loop of the last piece, fed one strip through the second to last loop and tied it off.

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I did the same thing on the other end and suddenly had a rug in front of me.

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After basking in the last moments of sunshine, I rolled up the rug and brought it inside.

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Where it was immediately claimed by another friend…

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Cooper.

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Looks like I’ll have to weave another rug for myself.

Next Time

  • The next rug will be bigger. Once I took this one off the loom it shrunk down a bit, and I love it too much for it to be small.
  • I won’t pull the woven strands as tightly, which will hopefully help with the shrinking.
  • Maybe I’ll try non-stretch cotton scraps?
  • I will plan to move the loom frame around a lot, and possibly rig up some way of leaning it upright while I’m weaving. Working flat gave me a back-ache.
  • I will take it in little batches, weaving in front of the tv or in public. If I weave in public I will look very serious about turning scraps into a comfy rug.

A sign of a successful project is the ability to look forward to the next one.

UPDATE: I enjoyed this project so much that I decided to remake this rug- BIGGER! I built a much larger loom using scrap wood and screws, then followed the same process to build this monstrosity. It sits cozily by my work table now, warms my feet, and makes me happy.

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RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment
Homemade mustard has been on my to-do list since last spring and I’m excited to finally make up a small batch. Since starting my herb garden this year, I’ve been keeping my eye out for new ways to harvest and use fresh herbs. This recipe from Wonky Wonderful made for a great starting point. I followed her basic guidelines and made some of my own alterations to suite my own tastes.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment

The first step is to soak your mustard seed over night. I combined 1/4 cup mustard seed, with a 1/4 cup filtered water and 1/4 cup four thieves vinegar (you can also use raw apple cider vinegar) in a small mason jar and set it in the refrigerator overnight.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment

The next morning, the mustard seed will have absorbed most of the liquid and be ready to prepare with the rest of the ingredients.

Pour the soaked mustard seed (and remaining liquid) into a food processor and add the following: 2 teaspoons lemon juice, 3 tablespoons honey (add more for a sweeter mustard flavor), 1/2 teaspoon turmeric, 1/4 teaspoon sea salt, and about 1 tablespoon fresh herbs. I also sprinkled in a few red pepper flakes.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

You can use any variety of herbs you like. I chose a few sprigs each of fresh thyme, oregano, parsley, rosemary and marjoram from my garden.

Once you’ve added all the ingredients, puree until you get a nice consistency. Transfer back into a clean mason jar and store in the refrigerator.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

This mustard will keep in the refrigerator for up to 4 weeks. I can’t wait to try it on my next ham sandwich!

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

Garden Herb Mustard
 
Author:
Recipe type: Condiment
Serves: About 1 cup
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup mustard seed
  • ¼ cup raw apple cider vinegar (I used four thieves vinegar)
  • ¼ cup filtered water
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon fresh herbs
Instructions
  1. Combine the mustard seed, vinegar, and water in a small jar and refrigerate overnight.
  2. Pour soaked mustard seed (and remaining liquid) into a food processor and add the remaining ingredients. Puree to desired consistency. Taste and add more honey or herbs if desired.
  3. Store in a clean mason jar. Refrigerate and use within 3-4 weeks.

 

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar
I can’t remember where exactly I first discovered Four Thieves vinegar, but I was intrigued by its use in history and it’s legendary story. Myth has it that a group of thieves during the European outbreak of the black plague set out to rob the dead and the sick in Marseille. When they were caught, they offered to exchange their secret recipe, which had allowed them to commit the robberies without catching the disease, in exchange for leniency. Another version says that the thieves had already been caught before the outbreak and their sentence had been to bury dead plague victims; to survive this punishment, they created the vinegar.

Recipes for this legendary concoction are as numerous as the stories. The following vinegar recipe hung in the Museum of Paris in 1937, and is said to have been an original copy of the recipe posted on the walls of Marseilles during an episode of the plague:

Take three pints of strong white wine vinegar, add a handful of each of wormwood, meadowsweet, wild marjoram and sage, fifty cloves, two ounces of campanula roots, two ounces of angelic, rosemary and horehound and three large measures of champhor. Place the mixture in a container for fifteen days, strain and express then bottle. Use by rubbing it on the hands, ears and temples from time to time when approaching a plague victim. [Source]

Plausible reasons for not contracting the Plague was that the herbal concoction contained natural flea repellents. Since the flea is the carrier for the Plague bacillus, Yersinia pestis. Wormwood has properties similar to cedar as an insect repellent, as all aromatics like sage, cloves, camphor, rosemary, campanula, etc. Meadowsweet, although known to contain salicyclic acid, it is mainly used to mask odors, like decomposing bodies.

Modern day versions of four thieves vinegar include various herbs that typically include sage, lavender, thyme, and rosemary, along with garlic. Additional herbs sometimes include rue, mint, and wormwood. It has become traditional to use four herbs in the recipe—one for each thief, though earlier recipes often have a dozen herbs or more. It is still sold in Provence. In Italy a mixture called “seven thieves vinegar” is sold as a smelling salt, though its ingredients appear to be the same as in four thieves mixtures.

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar
 
One of the main reasons I wanted to make this vinegar is because I have all of the following herbs growing fresh in my garden! If you have your own herb garden, this is a great way to use your harvest.
Author:
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lavender, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh mint, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh sage, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh thyme, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh marjoram, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh anise hyssop, chopped
  • 4 cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed
  • ½ teaspoon black peppercorns, crushed
  • 3 whole cloves, crushed
  • 16 oz raw apple cider vinegar
Instructions
  1. Combine chopped herbs, spices and garlic in a quart size mason jar and cover with the apple cider vinegar.
  2. Allow to infuse for 7-10 days in a sunny location then strain into a clean jar. Store at room temperature.

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

Uses

Natural Cleanser – The herbs used in this recipe posess strong antimicrobial effects and vinegar, in any case, makes an excellent natural cleanser. Fill a spray bottle with the vinegar and use it to clean and sterilize kitchen counters and bathrooms.
Astringent – Dilute some vinegar with water and use as a cleansing agent or astringent for the skin.
Insect Repellant – Fill a spray bottle with 1/4 cup of vinegar and top with filtered water. Spray on skin, clothes, etc. to deter pesky bugs.
Seasoning – Use as a seasoning for braised meats and vegetables or make a vinaigrette dressing for salads.
Immune Booster – Use like Fire Cider and take a teaspoonful several times a day to prevent cold/flu.

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party

In my last post, I mentioned that my 31st birthday is coming up and I am planning to celebrate by hosting a Bloody Mary themed party. I’ve been craving a good Bloody Mary ever since we got hit with our first heat wave in Portland. It felt too hot to cook or really eat much in 95+ degree heat and a cold Bloody Mary with all the fixings sounded like the perfect dinner on a hot summer night. (Un)lucky for me, the weather forecast for this coming weekend says the heat will be back on with another 97 degree high so I guess I’ll finally get exactly what I’ve been craving.

In preparation for the party I decided to infuse some vodkas. I chose two recipes, a special Bloody Mary Infusion (think garlic) and Bacon Habanero (think spicy).

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party

5.0 from 1 reviews
Bloody Mary Infused Vodka
 
Author:
Recipe type: Cocktail
Ingredients
  • • Garlic, crushed
  • • Tomato, sliced
  • • Olives
  • • Bell Pepper, halved
  • • Cilantro
  • • Dill
  • • Vodka
Instructions
  1. Fill a large mason jar with garlic, tomato, bell pepper, olives and herbs. I filled my jar about ⅓-1/2 of the way. Next add the vodka, filling the jar. Allow to infuse in the refrigerator for at least three days (I infused for a full week). Strain and discard the veggies, then pour infused vodka back into a clean jar or bottle.

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party

The Bloody Mary Infusion can be made up any way you want so feel free to try different combinations. Other ingredients to consider adding are: celery, cucumber, jalapeño, peppercorns. Now on to the bacon….

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party

5.0 from 1 reviews
Bacon Habanero Infused Vodka
 
Author:
Recipe type: Cocktail
Ingredients
  • 6 slices pepper bacon, cooked
  • 3 habanero peppers, halved and seeded
  • 2 serrano peppers, halved and seeded
  • Vodka
Instructions
  1. Place bacon and peppers in a large mason jar and cover with vodka, filling the jar. Let infuse in the refrigerator for up to one week. Give it a taste test after 3-4 days. The longer it infuses the spicier it will become.

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party