DIY: Photo Album Pop-up Ornaments


Okay. I’ll admit it. I have possibly been making too many ornaments.

The floor is covered in little bits of paper, the ribbons are everywhere, and cat is oh so happy. (Happy and thus in the background of many of my photos.) I can’t help it. I’ve given myself over to the ornament bug, and even though I’ve told myself that these are ‘just this year’s ornaments’, I’m not sure I’ll have the self control to throw them all away.

I need a crafter help line… or maybe I can just spread the decoration disease and have you all join me in the madness. (*evil laughter*)

My sister recently handed over a large bag of family photos, and after the proper period of mortification I decided that I needed to do something with them. The best part about being in charge of photo projects is that you can include only adorable pictures of yourself, and edit out the slightly more awkward times.

I pulled together a selection of photos of family that yelled “HAPPY HOLIDAYS, Y’ALL!” Scanned and shrank them, then pulled out a few basic tools to turn the faces I love into ornaments I’ll cherish.

IMG_3792_photoalbumornaments

SUPPLIES

  • Resized photos printed on medium-heavy weight paper
  • Extra colored paper or cardstock
  • Medium to large hole punches– any symmetrical shape will work, I used circles and ovals
  • Ribbon or string
  • Buttons, bells, or beads
  • Paper glue or adhesive

IMG_3802_photoalbumornaments
To begin I punched my favorite people out of my favorite photos, and the same number of circles out of cardstock. Then I chose between 4 and 6 of my favorites, the same number of solid circles, and folded each in half– top to bottom.

IMG_3806_photoalbumornaments
I chose a button than matched my cardstock, then cut about 16 inches of string and fed it through the button.

IMG_3811_photoalbumornaments
I used my Scotch ATG gun to apply adhesive to each folded piece (glue works too).

IMG_3817_photoalbumornaments
I attached each piece to the one before it in a stack, alternating photos and cardstock. (Make sure that you don’t accidentally glue your sister in upside-down. She wouldn’t like that. All photos should point the same way.)

IMG_3823_photoalbumornaments
I laid the string and button across the spine of my stack (button on the bottom), added a little adhesive to one of the folded pieces, and attached the top and bottom piece to form a ball shape.

IMG_3825_photoalbumornaments
Then I fed another button on above the ball, tied a knot, and fluffed open all the pages.

IMG_3827_photoalbumornaments
I love how simple they look from far away, but each page is a memory of the holidays and of my family.

IMG_3842_photoalbumornaments
I did a few variations, using different punches, and combining shapes on one ribbon; but they are all put together the same way which means I could spend more time remembering good times than obsessing over the process.


It also means it’s a great project for kids, who might get a thrill out of punching holes out of photos.
IMG_3898_photoalbumornaments
and keeping them forever.

DIY: Playing Card Ornaments

IMG_3564_playingcardornaments
An old deck of cards in one hand, and the perfect Christmas Tree outside… something weird’s gonna happen.

We love games at this house. Card games, board games… you name it. I don’t love worn-out cards, though, so I’ve been looking for a clever way of getting rid of a couple of our older decks. After playing with strips of paper as Christmas ornaments, I started thinking about ways to turn flat cards into 3-d shapes. Internet searches gave me a few options, including this great tutorial for making ornaments out of MTG playing cards. After following the tutorial, I made a couple of tweaks and ended up with another great collection of ornaments for our outdoor holiday tree.

IMG_3459_playingcardornaments

Supplies

  • A deck of cards
  • Thin-ish wire: I used 22 Gauge floral wire
  • Assorted beads or buttons: Make sure the wire will fit through the holes.
  • Wire clippers and pliers
  • Craft knife or paper cutter
  • Awl or large needle for piercing cards
  • Ribbon or string

IMG_3465_playingcardornaments
To begin you will cut several playing cards into 1/2″ strips. Choose 16 of those pieces to turn into your first ornament.

IMG_3471_playingcardornaments
Poke a hole, at the bottom and top of each piece, approximately 1/4″ from the end. (You should be able to pierce through multiple cards at once.)

IMG_3543_playingcardornaments
Trim a length of wire, approximately 10″ long, and put a small loop in one end. String at least one bead as a stopper, then start feeding your card pieces on, one at a time. This will be the bottom of your ornament, and the side showing from the bottom (shown above) will be the side of the card facing out on your ornament.

IMG_3527_playingcardornaments

The red side will be hidden on the inside of this ornament.


Once you have all your card pieces fed on the wire, add about 1-1/2″ of beads as spacers.

IMG_3544_playingcardornaments
Starting with the bottom piece of card, gently feed the wire through the pierced hole at the other end.

IMG_3545_playingcardornaments
Do the same with the next lowest piece of card, letting it rest against one side. Repeat with the next lowest piece of card EXCEPT let it rest on the other side of the center.

IMG_3547_playingcardornaments
Repeat this action on each piece, going back and forth between each side of the ornament. It should begin to form a sphere.

IMG_3538_playingcardornaments
There should be just enough space to feed the last (most interior) piece through. If you feel like the pieces are too cramped, you may want to gently tear a piece or two off your wire.

IMG_3550_playingcardornaments
When you have all the pieces wrapped back around, add another bead or two, make a loop in the wire, and trim. Feed a ribbon through the loop, and you have a nifty ornament!

IMG_3606_playingcardornaments

IMG_3569_playingcardornaments

Other things to try

  • Make the spacer inside the ornament longer for a more spherical ornament, or make it shorter for a more compressed “space saucer” ornament. The different shapes will need a slightly different number of card pieces, but I’ve found that they all use between 14 and 16 pieces.
  • String two ornaments on the same wire for a more complex shape.
  • Mix and match back pieces and front pieces for a striped pattern.
  • String an extra piece of beaded wire or string to the bottom of the ornament for even more decoration.
  • Go crazy with bead spacers and see what happens.

IMG_3576_playingcardornaments
What do you think? Trash to treasure?

DIY: Scrap Paper Strip Ornaments

IMG_3203_paperstripornament
Up until the last couple of years, Safety Husband and I would go home to Texas for the holidays, and we never felt the need to decorate for the season. For the last couple of years we’ve talked about decorating the “Christmas Tree” that just happens to be growing in our upper yard, and this year we’re making it happen. I’ve been putting my brain power into making ornaments that are either weatherproof, or are meant to be thrown away in January. It’s been a great chance to work through some of the materials I’ve been… ahem… collecting.

I love vintage ornaments and paper, and after a couple of years of experimentation I was ready to combine those two loves in this one ornament design. Super quick, because they are held together by staples, a couple of basic techniques can build a whole tree’s worth of decoration.

IMG_2828_paperstripornament

Supplies

  • Stapler
  • Ribbon (3/8″ to 1/2″ wide is great)
  • Scrap Paper: I used leftover 12×12 scrapbooking paper, but catalog or magazine pages would work well too! If you’re using thin paper, you might want to double up on the number of strips per ornament.
  • Clips: binder clips work great for this, but a clothespin will work in a pinch. (Pun intended.)
  • Scissors

IMG_2867_paperstripornament
To begin, cut about eight 1/2″ strips off your paper. (You can vary the number, just make sure you have an even number of strips.)

IMG_2871_paperstripornament
Cut a length of ribbon about twice the length of your paper strips.

IMG_2900_paperstripornament
Fold the ribbon in half, and stack half the strips on each side. Staple near the bottom of the stack, away from the loop of ribbon.

IMG_2904_paperstripornament
The staple will go through all the paper and the ribbon, securing that point. (Staples must be cheating, because they make this too easy.)

IMG_2921_paperstripornament
Put a clip about halfway down the paper, clamping the whole stack of paper and ribbon. With one hand, hold the clip, and with the other gently pull on the loop of the ribbon.

IMG_2923_paperstripornament
This should cause the paper to pooch out a little on the other side of the clip. Repeat the holding and pulling step, but this time grab the ribbon loop and the two strips of paper closest to it on either side.

IMG_2926_paperstripornament
Repeat again and again, adding another strip on either side, until you reach the outer strip.

IMG_2927_paperstripornament

IMG_2931_paperstripornament
Then carefully put a staple through the area the clip was holding.

IMG_2934_paperstripornament

IMG_2936_paperstripornament
Trim any excess paper with a pair of scissors.

IMG_2950_paperstripornament
If you want, you can curl some of the extra paper to add a little decorative detail. Simply roll the paper around a small pencil or paintbrush to curl it.

IMG_2959_paperstripornament
Once you get the hang of the whole pull method, you can shake things up by doing a similar technique, upside-down.

IMG_2977_paperstripornament
Staple in the middle of your ornament, and turn each strip back down. Once you’ve turned each strip, staple them at the bottom to form a heart shape.

IMG_3014_paperstripornament
Using these two techniques you can make a whole range of funky vintage ornaments.

IMG_3448_paperstripornament
If you get sick of looking at the staples, you can replace them with a couple of stitches. Simply poke a hole in the middle of the stack, and make stitches back and forth to secure the ornament.

IMG_3457_paperstripornament
Remove the staple, and you’ll never know it was there.

IMG_3130_paperstripornament
Or spend that time making a whole army or ornaments. It’s up to you!

IMG_3271_paperstripornament
One set down, more to go.

DIY: Simple Trees for Your Chipboard Forest

IMG_3721_chipboardtrees
Even before I was done building little chipboard houses I knew they would need a little setting to live in. I wanted to come up with a simple and flexible tree template that I could make a whole forest out of. Inspired by my old paper bird project, I used strips of chipboard to build these trees.

IMG_3354_chipboardtrees

Supplies

  • Scrap chipboard: from the backs of notepads or boxes. My pieces were 8.5×11″
  • You favorite paper glue
  • Clothespins or clips
  • Craft knife
  • Scoring Tool: a bone folder or dull knife work great

IMG_3356_chipboardtrees
I began by making two score lines along the long side of the board, at .5″ and at 2.5″.

IMG_3374_chipboardtrees
Then I cut two pieces, 1″ wide, off the other side for the trunk of my tree. The remaining piece of chipboard had my score marks on it, and I trimmed it into 1″ pieces (each piece has the same score marks).

I applied glue to the trunk pieces, and clipped them together to dry.

IMG_3380_chipboardtrees
While the trunk glue was drying, I folded each of my small pieces along the score marks, forming an L.

IMG_3387_chipboardtrees
Piece by piece, I applied glue to the .5″ flap and the top of the L…

IMG_3392_chipboardtrees
then clipped them to the trunk. In this picture you can see that I folded the two pieces of the trunk away from each other at the base; this will allow the trees to sit by themselves.

IMG_3400_chipboardtrees
I continued to add tree pieces until I liked what I saw (typically between 2 and 4 tiers), holding each piece with a couple of clips.

IMG_3405_chipboardtrees
When I was happy, let the glue sit overnight, held by the clips. (Happy little trees, as the man said.)

IMG_3707_chipboardtrees
On some I trimmed the top a bit, some I left tall. I love the way the variety turned out. These would be great with snowy glitter added, or paint. I’m just happy to have a forest for my little chipboard houses.

IMG_3701_chipboardtrees
Trees for the little paper world.

 

Yes, I know I sound crazy. Now go make something!

(;

DIY: Season’s Greetings Printable Herb Packet Gift

Season's Greetings Printable Herb Packet Gift Idea
I recently created this fun holiday printable idea for Garden Therapy and thought I would share it here on A.I.M for you to enjoy! -Rachel

Quick and easy holiday gifts are essential for surviving the holiday season. This free printable “Season’s Greetings” Herb Packet is perfect for small gifts and can easily fit into the mail with your holiday greeting cards! Use herbs harvested from your own garden to create flavorful seasoning mixes paired with a simple and delicious recipe.

CLICK HERE to for the full tutorial and free printable download over at Garden Therapy!

Season's Greetings Printable Herb Packet Gift Idea

DIY: Paper Spiderwebs to Decorate Everything

Step by step this house is getting properly October spooky. I’m a big fan of decorating with the things I have around, and this collection of tarnished silver and moody ornaments needed one little touch, so I decided to make a spiderweb table runner out of scrap paper and a piece of ribbon.

IMG_1673_paperspiderwebs

SUPPLIES

  • A few sheets of paper, any color you fancy. I used card stock, which was a bit trickier to cut but more durable in the long run.
  • Small clips or tape
  • Your favorite craft knife
  • A hole punch
  • Ribbon
  • The spiderweb templateaim_paperspiderweb

IMG_1682_paperspiderwebs
Once you have printed the spiderweb template, use tape or the clips to secure it to a sheet or two of paper, and cut the spiderweb shape out with a craft knife. You will also punch holes where each X is.

IMG_1693_paperspiderwebs

Cutting Tips

Start trimming the small center pieces out first and move to the large pieces. I actually cut all the inner pieces, then moved on the the next sheet of paper until I have enough pieces. Then I cut the outer shape out of several pieces at once using scissors.

IMG_1701_paperspiderwebs
When you’ve cut out and punched all your pieces, weave a piece of ribbon in and out of the holes to connect several spiderwebs.

IMG_1791_paperspiderwebs
I overlapped the corners of each spiderweb piece to make my table runner…

IMG_1716_paperspiderwebs
and hung them all on one ribbon for a creepy spiderweb banner.

IMG_1735_paperspiderwebs
The possibilities are, as they say, endless! I’m even thinking of creepy spiders to add to them.

The motionless, paper kind.

 

What’re you decorating with?

BIZ: How To Prepare For Your First Craft Show

My booth at the Crafty Wonderland Super Colossal Holiday Sale, 2013.

Camp Smartypants‘ booth at Crafty Wonderland Holiday Sale, 2013.

 

UPDATE: This post originally ran on April 9, 2014. Since holiday craft show season is on the way we thought we’d share it again in the hopes that you find some useful tips and enjoy the free printable checklist!

Applying for your first ever craft show? We’ve got some important tips to help make your experience fun and successful, plus advice from seasoned craft show vendors and a free printable checklist of must-have items you should have with you.

Choose your show:

When I first started my business, Camp Smartypants, I applied to as many craft shows as possible. Some shows I was busy with customers and other shows I sat in an empty room with no one but other vendors. I recommend doing a bit of research about the event before applying for any show. Find out how many years the event has been running and what ways they promote the show. How many shoppers do they expect to attend? Is it indoor or outdoor? If they don’t seem to have much of a promotion plan, I’d say look for a better show. Without proper promotion, potential shoppers won’t know about the event and you’ll be sitting in your booth by yourself, bored all day.

It’s also a good idea to find out who the show’s past vendors are. Take a look at the event website and browse through their photo galleries (if they have them). Would your products fit in with the other types of vendors? It’s also great to see how people have set-up their booth displays for that particular show as well.

Here I am at my very first craft show in 2009 at the Doug Fir in Portland, Oregon.

Here I am at my very first craft show in 2009 at the Doug Fir in Portland, Oregon.

 

Applying for your first craft show:

Depending on what type of event you are applying too, you’ll need to fill out a detailed application. Make sure you follow their application instructions exactly and provide clear photographs to your work and a link to your website or Etsy shop. Some shows may even ask for a photograph of what your booth will look like so if this is your first craft fair, don’t wait until the last minute to apply as you may have to set up a mock booth to photograph for your application. Also be sure to read the F.A.Q. page on the event’s website. They will often explain further how to submit a good application.

Note: Some shows, like Crafty Wonderland here in Portland or Urban Craft Uprising in Seattle, are fairly competitive to get into, so don’t get discouraged if you aren’t accepted the first time you apply. Instead review your application and look at how you can improve it for the next time you apply and yes, you should definitely apply again!

Our first craft show was in Missoula, MT called the Missoula MADE fair. We were living in Spokane at the time, so it was the closest one to us. It was summer and held in an outdoor park downtown and it was very memorable! The day started out sunny and beautiful, but they’re known for quick sudden thunder storms to roll in. The wind picked up and it started hailing and raining for about the last hour of the show. People were packing up and leaving. We had lots of prints, cards, some tea towels and pillows, but were lucky enough to be towards the center area of the covered canopy they had, so our things didn’t get too wet, but still, it was pretty crazy. – Year Round Co.

How Much Product Should I Make?

As much as you possibly can. Bring everything you have, even if you don’t think you’ll sell all of it. You want your booth to look nice and full. You don’t want a big table with only a few items on it. I’ve always gone by the rule, the more you make, the more you’ll sell.

Designing Your Booth:

I always set up my entire booth at home before the show. That way I know exactly how things will be set up and I can take my time figuring out the best display for my products. Use a tape measure to mark off the exact dimensions of your booth space in your living room and start setting things up. Experiment with different arrangements of your products to find the most appealing setup. It’s good to display product at different levels so that the customer’s eye has multiple places to look when visiting your booth.

Year Round Co. show booth

Year Round Co. (formerly Slide Sideways) at Renegade Holiday Show in San Francisco.

 

Our current display is made up of pallet wood that Scott put together and painted. Our display has to be durable enough to be taken apart multiple times a year while also fitting into our car and, of coarse, look good and able to hold all the product we carry, so a lot of thought went into the design and how it would break down. We seem to constantly be evolving how it looks or how our new products fit into it too. –Year Round Co.

BOOTH ESSENTIALS:

Table. Consider the size of your allotted booth space. Your booth display should fill your entire space. You don’t want a table that’s too big or too small.
Tablecloth. When choosing a tablecloth (I like using a twin size flat sheet), consider the color and look of your products. You want a tablecloth color that will compliment your handmade goods and make them stand out. Usually neutral colors work best (unless your products are the same color). Avoid using patterned fabric for your tablecloth as this can potentially distract the viewer and make your booth look too busy.
Banner. Make some sort of sign or banner with your shop name on it. I made my sign by hand-painting my shop logo onto canvas and sewing it into a banner I can hang in front of my table.
Signage. All your products need to be clearly marked with a price. Consider making small signs or tags to attach to each item.
Display Items. This is where you really have to be creative. Choose display items that are lightweight and easy to set up. You don’t have to break the bank; great places to find baskets, frames, containers, etc. are local thrift and vintage stores. Don’t be afraid to give an old crate or shelf a DIY facelift with a little cleaning or new paint job. You can also look at IKEA or a display fixture store in your area (like Portland Store Fixtures here in Portland, Oregon.) Lastly, when designing your booth, you can’t depend on having a wall behind you. Everything in your display needs to be free-standing.

I use wood crates, old tackle boxes and vintage glass collected from thrift stores to display my handmade jewelry and art. Some things I make sure to have with me at every craft show are: a lint roller, paper towels, coffee, and a mirror for customers to use when trying on my jewelry. –A Tea Leaf

The Day of the Show:

I like to arrive to any craft show 1-2 hours before the doors open. I don’t want to feel stressed or rushed about setting up plus I like to give myself time to run to the bathroom, grab a cup of coffee/tea, and get settled into my booth before the doors open.

It’s also a good idea to ask a friend or family member to help you load in and out for your event. Remember that you have to load your entire booth into the show space and you may have to carry things quite a distance. (If you have a hand truck or rolling cart, bring it).

In addition to bringing my entire booth display and all my products, I always bring the following items to any craft fair. It’s better to ‘be prepared’ than be freaking out about forgetting something or something going wrong. This checklist will help you have a stress-free, successful show! You can download it here and use it for your first show!

Free Printable Craft Show Checklist by Adventures In Making http://www.adventures-in-making.com

CRAFT SHOW CHECKLIST: (Free Printable)

A chair. If it can fit behind your booth, you’re going to want it.

Water bottle and food. You most likely will not be able to leave your booth during the event. Depending on how long the event lasts bring plenty of snacks or lunch so you don’t get hungry/cranky.

Emergency tool kit: Pens, pencils, tape, hammer, pliers, box cutter, scissors, safety pins, tacks, twine, zip ties, extra price tags/stickers, band-aids, tampons, Ibuprofen, hand wipes, napkins.

Change, cash box and calculator. make sure you have plenty of change (mainly $1 and $5). I usually get $100 in change for a show and that’s been plenty for me. I keep all my change in a metal cash box behind my booth. You could also wear an apron or fanny pack to keep all your change in.

Square App. an essential tool for any craft show. The Square App allows you to take credit cards on your smartphone or tablet. You can order the Square Reader for free here. Before the show starts, set up your free account and do a test transaction (I usually charge $1) to make sure it’s ready and working. Make sure your device is fully charged and don’t use up your battery power on facebook or instagram during the event. Also- ask the event coordinator if they have wifi access for vendors.

A notebook and pen to track sales. It’s good practice to write down every sale. That way you can review what items sold the best and how much money you made at the end of the day.

Business cards. Business cards a SUPER important to have at a craft show. I order mine from Got Print. You can also look for local printers in your area. Make sure your business card includes your name, your shop name, your email and website/etsy shop. This way customers who aren’t looking to buy something the day of the show can find you again.

Mailing list sign up sheet. So you can stay in touch with your customers.

Tools of your craft. Especially good for last minute repairs. If show traffic is slowing down, I’ll usually get out my supplies for making my products and get to work. Customers love seeing you in action! It could spark conversation and questions about you and your work. Just make sure it’s something you can put down easily so you can continue to interact with customers and make sales.

Packaging materials. You’ll need to bag or box up your product when someone makes a purchase. Make sure you have enough bags, tissue, etc. to properly package sold goods for customers.

Wear comfortable shoes and layers. Keep in mind that you’ll most likely be on your feet most of the time so comfortable shoes are important. Also, you never know what the temperature of the room will be (or what the weather will be if you’re event is outdoors) so it’s best to have a few layers of clothing you can take on/off.

We keep a small box that holds all the nuts/bolts/screws we need, plus a screw driver, extra hooks, and tape. We always keep pens, lots of business cards, and sometimes even our wholesale info on hand too, you never know if a potential store owner will be stopping by. Snacks and water are never forgotten either! – Year Round Co.

A FEW FINAL TIPS:

Show Etiquette. Tearing down your booth and/or loading out before the show ends is extremely bad show etiquette and disrupts the flow of any show. Even if you sold out of all your products, don’t tear down your booth (unless you have special permission from the event coordinator). If you tear down early, a lot of shows will put you on their ‘naughty’ list and won’t invite you back to do the show again. Also, be sure to leave your space as you found it and throw away any garbage.

Exposure and feedback. Don’t be too upset if you don’t sell out or make a ton of money at your first show. Many of the shows I first attended I didn’t make much more than the cost of the booth fee. Exposure of you and your work and customer feedback are the best things you can gain at your first show. This is your chance to test out your products, interact with customers and receive instant feedback on your work. As a rule, if I at least make my booth fee back, I consider it a success.

Outdoor shows. If you are planning to attend an outdoor show, I recommend using a pop-up canopy. They are quite an investment to buy, so ask the show coordinator of there’s someone you can borrow or share a canopy with. Also remember to prepare you booth for inclimate weather. You don’t want anything to fall or collapse due to a gust of wind and you don’t want your product to be ruined by rain or fade in the sunshine. Also- sunscreen and bug repellent are important.

Network! A craft show is the perfect opportunity for you to meet other like-minded people! Talk to the other vendors. Tell them it’s your first show and don’t be afraid to ask them questions. I’ve made many new friends this way and it’s great to offer each other advice and support.

Opportunities. Local shop owners might be attending the event on the look out for new handmade products for their shop! I’ve received many consignment opportunities with stores that first saw my work at a craft show.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCE: The Ultimate Craft Show Preparation Link List by Handmadeology

SaveSave

DIY: Easter Inspiration

Easter is just a few days away we’re soaking up some inspiration in preparation for Sunday. I usually keep things pretty simple on Easter. Fresh flowers, dyed eggs, brunch and an easter treat are my favorite ways to celebrate. This year I’m hoping to make something new and even start a new easter tradition. How will you celebrate?

DIY: Easter Inspiration #recipes #craft

1. Bunny Topiary Wreath by The House That Lars Built
2. Egg Shell Candles by PunchBowl
3. Flower Napkins by Source Unknown
4. Bird Nest Votives by NaturKinder
5. Pussy Willow Wreath by Better Homes & Gardens
6. Easter Place Cards by Casa e Trend
7. Sugar Cookie Easter Egg Nests by Lovely Little Kitchen
8. Hot Cross Buns by Delia Online
9. Easter Egg Planter by Angenuity

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink
I’ve had my eye out for something special to make for Valentine’s Day this year. When I spotted this recipe for Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies I couldn’t resist giving it a try. Not only are these cookies PINK but they’re also strawberry flavored and have a white chocolate center!

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink

These cookies are another spend-all-afternoon-in-the-kitchen type of dessert, which I don’t mind as long as I can take my time and enjoy the process. In an electric mixer, beat together butter and sugar. Using a separate bowl, combine the egg with the strawberry and vanilla extracts. Beat together then pour into the butter/sugar mix. Mix well.

Sift together the flour, baking powder and salt in a separate bowl. Slowly add it, ½ cup at a time, to the mixer until fully combined. Now you should have a nice dough. It shouldn’t be too sticky, so add more flour if it sticks to your finger when pressing into it.

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink

Roll the dough out into a log, and then cut it into three sections. Roll each section into a ball then poke your fingers in to create a small hole. Add your gel coloring a little at a time until you achieve a color you like. I chose three different shades of pink. Wrap each ball in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for about 1 hour.

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink

Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line a baking sheet with parchment. Roll the dough into approx. 1.5” balls, then press a candy melt into the center of each ball. Next roll them back up into balls (with the candy melt inside).

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink
RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink

Pour your various pink sprinkles into small bowls and coat each ball with a good layer, then place it back onto the baking sheet. Once all the balls are sprinkled, use the bottom of a pint glass to press the cookies down into a round disk.

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink
RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink

Bake at 350 degrees for 9 minutes. Transfer to wire racks to cool. Makes approx. 2-dozen.

strawberry-sprinkle-cookie-6

5.0 from 1 reviews
Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Dessert
Serves: 2 dozen
Ingredients
  • 2 sticks of unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 ½ cup powdered sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tsp strawberry flavor
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 ¾ cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • Pink gel coloring
  • Pink sprinkles
  • White candy melts
Instructions
  1. In an electric mixer, beat together butter and sugar. Using a separate bowl, combine the egg with the strawberry and vanilla extracts. Beat together then pour into the butter/sugar mix. Mix well.
  2. Sift together the flour, baking powder and salt in a separate bowl. Slowly add it, ½ cup at a time, to the mixer until fully combined. Now you should have a nice dough. It shouldn’t be too sticky, so add more flour if it sticks to your finger when pressing it.
  3. Roll the dough out into a log, and then cut it into three sections. Roll each section into a ball then poke your fingers in to create a small hole. Add your gel coloring a little at a time until you achieve a color you like. I chose three different shades of pink. Wrap each ball in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for about 1 hour.
  4. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line a baking sheet with parchment. Roll the dough into approx. 1.5” balls, then press a candy melt into the center of each ball. Next roll them back up into balls (with the candy melt inside).
  5. Pour your various pink sprinkles into small bowls and coat each ball with a good layer, then place it back onto the baking sheet. Once all the balls are sprinkled, use the bottom of a pint glass to press the cookies down into a round disk.
  6. Bake at 350 degrees for 9 minutes. Transfer to wire racks to cool. Makes approx. 2-dozen.

 

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink

These cookies are so pretty, they’d make a wonderful gift for Valentine’s Day! Stack them up inside a wide mouth mason jar and decorate with a pretty ribbon and gift tag.

RECIPE: Strawberry Sprinkle Cookies #valentinesday #valentine #baking #pink

Labels and gift tags courtesy of Evermine.com.