DIY: Watercolor & Wax Paper Jewelry

IMG_6410_waxedpaperjewelry

Sometimes I come up with a project that I enjoy so much that it’s hard to stop to write a post. This, my friends, is one of those.

It’s a simple combination of watercolor, melting wax, and punching shapes- but it’s oh so satisfying.

 

SUPPLIES

  • Thick paper for Watercolor
  • Watercolor paints and brushes
  • Pencil
  • Straight Edge
  • Paraffin Wax
  • Scraping Tool, like a vegetable peeler.
  • Iron, ironing board, towel or other surface to catch wiley bits of wax
  • Parchment Paper
  • Scissors
  • Large Thick Material Punches (optional but recommended) I used circle punches in 2″ diameter, 1.5″ diameter, and 1″ diameter
  • Small hole punch
  • Thin cord or ribbon
  • Jump Rings (optional)

Step One: Paint it

IMG_6321_waxedpaperjewelry

Gather your paper, pencil, straight edge, paints and brushes.

IMG_6325_waxedpaperjewelry

Draw several parallel lines with your pencil to create stripes of varying widths.

Begin filling in each stripe with a color in the order of the rainbow. (ROY G BIV –  Red Orange Yellow Green Blue Indigo Violet).

If you fill a small stripe, use a similar color next to it (Orange red and Red for instance.) It’s okay if your paint is a little irregular, or you have small white spaces.

IMG_6341_waxedpaperjewelry

Now it’s time to paint the back of your pendant. Draw some non-parallel lines on a new piece of paper, and fill them in with some of the same colors you used on the other side. Leave a little white space as well. Set your paintings aside to dry.

Step Two: Wax it

IMG_6344_waxedpaperjewelry

Now you will need your ironing setup, parchment paper, and wax. You might have a little wax escape during the ironing process, so it’s a good idea to have a scrap towel or cotton fabric to protect your ironing board. Remember to keep an eye on your ironing so you don’t singe anything!

IMG_6345_waxedpaperjewelry

Sandwich one of your dry watercolor sheets inside a piece of parchment paper. Shred a pile of wax on top. (You can always add more wax, so this is a good time to play!)

IMG_6347_waxedpaperjewelry

Turn your iron to it’s lowest setting, and gently melt the wax between the sheets of parchment paper. You will see the paper start to look wet. Continue working the liquid wax into the paper until it starts to be consistently translucent. You may want to add more wax.

IMG_6349_waxedpaperjewelry

Flip your paper over, and add a pile of wax to the other side. This will be the “glue” that holds your two sides together.

IMG_6350_waxedpaperjewelry

Lay the other piece of paper on top of that pile…

IMG_6352_waxedpaperjewelry

shred some more wax on that, and iron again following the earlier instructions.

IMG_6355_waxedpaperjewelry

Continue to add wax until the papers are translucent and consistently wet looking. When you’re happy with the look, put a little bit of weight on the stack, and let it cool for a couple of minutes.

IMG_6356_waxedpaperjewelryWhen it is still warm, but safe to touch, uncover the paper, and use your finger or a tool to smooth any puddles of wax. (Playing in wax is one of my favorite things!) Now let it cool completely (a few minutes.)

Step Three: Punch it

IMG_6359_waxedpaperjewelry

I am loving these thick material punches from Fiskars. I have long abused normal paper punches, and they have a habit of breaking at the worst possible moment. These punches go through everything like butter.

IMG_6361_waxedpaperjewelryUse a punch (or scissors) to take shapes out of your waxed paper…

IMG_6365_waxedpaperjewelry

until you have a nice little pile of shapes to work with. To turn solid shapes into pendants, punch small holes on one or two sides. You can run cord through these holes (or attach jump rings.)

IMG_6368_waxedpaperjewelry

After you have everything cut out, polish the shapes by using your fingers to rub excess wax off the surface and edges.

IMG_6404_waxedpaperjewelry

Feed thin ribbon, cord, or chain through the holes in your pendants. You can feed your cord through, wrap it several times, or tie a lark’s head knot. Anything goes! Leave enough room to slip the necklace over your head, and you’re set.

IMG_6395_waxedpaperjewelry

Double sided rainbow pendants!

Now I want to wax all the paper. Someone stop me before I go too far!

Show+Tell: Printable Color-in Birds and Postcard Kit

birdcoloringsheet2_photoshopped
I’ve been trying to do a little more illustration lately, and the bird theme this month was a perfect opportunity. I had a ton of fun making these whimsical feathered friends and thought I would share them as a free printable sheet.

birdcoloringsheet
Click here to print a free coloring sheet!


Even better! These guys make lovely postcards, and if you’d like a set to color and share, you can pick up a set from our Etsy Shop. Each postcard set is printed on thick, durable 110# smooth white stock. The sheet is perforated into four postcards with a a space for a message and address on the back. All your purchases go to help us continue sharing our creative adventures and yours!

IMG_4835_birdcolorinpostcardskit
Just color in as much as you’d like, and send them to a friend to finish.

IMG_4828_birdcolorinpostcardskit

Pick up a set to share!

DIY: Paper Maché Birdy Penny Bank

IMG_4952_birdybank
My friend Tara is a paper maché inspiration. A couple of years ago she made a couple of piggy banks that were so amazing I decided I needed to make a bank of my very own. A birdy bank.

I love that papier maché gives you the opportunity to make basically anything out of recycled materials. This is a great project for kids and adults alike- just be ready to take it in shifts over a couple of days so that the form has time to dry between each coat.
IMG_4669_birdybank

Basic Supplies and Tools

  • A table cloth or paper cover and an apron. This is a wonderfully messy project!
  • A balloon
  • Newspaper
  • Flour and water (to make paste)
  • A piece of chipboard (like scrap from a cracker box)
  • This template for the feet, beak, wings and tailfeathers (which you will cut from chipboard.)
  • Masking Tape
  • Glue – Hot glue works great, but other thick glues work in a pinch
  • Scissors and craft knife

Finishing Supplies

  • Sand paper or sanding block
  • Acrylic paint
  • ‘ glue or similar
  • Brush

 

Step One: Starting the Paper Maché and Form

IMG_4676_birdybank
Blow up one balloon about 5.5″ in diameter, and crumple up a piece of paper to make a head about 2.5″ in diameter. Tape the “head” to the balloon*, roughly the opposite side from the tied end.  (If you would prefer the inside of the birdy to be smooth, cover the balloon with a layer of paper maché before attaching the head.)

IMG_4685_birdybank
To make your simple paper maché paste, mix one part flour with one part water. (You can change this ratio if you prefer a more watery or thicker paste. Practice makes perfect.) Stir the paste with your finger until it is smooth.

IMG_4686_birdybank
Tear your newspaper into small strips and pieces and begin to coat your body form with a layer of newspaper. Dip each strip into the paste, and pull it through your fingers to remove excess paste and moisture.

IMG_4690_birdybank
Overlap the pieces of newspaper on your form, and cover all but the tied end. It may be helpful to set the balloon on a cup or bowl to lift it off of your surface.

IMG_4700_birdybank
When you have completely covered the form with one layer of newspaper, set it aside to dry. If you have a fan or space heater, set this little guy in front of that and it will dry faster. Make sure to let it dry almost completely before moving to the next layer of material, or you will have a soppy mess. At least wait a few hours.

Step Two: Adding more Detail

IMG_4708_birdybank
Since your bird looks nothing like a bird yet, it’s time to add some appendages. Download and print this template and cut each of the pieces from a piece of chipboard.

IMG_4711_birdybank
To build the birdy legs, cut into one side of the chipboard as shown, and roll the other end into a cylinder. Secure the roll with a couple of pieces of tape.

IMG_4714_birdybank

IMG_4717_birdybank
Then tape across the foot to attach it to the leg. The flap left at the end of the leg will be glued to the base of your balloon form.

IMG_4726_birdybank
Roll the beak to form a cone shape, and tape it in shape. Stuff a little piece of paper into the open end of the cone to make it easier to attach to your birdy head.

IMG_4732_birdybank
Glue works best to secure the wings, legs, beak, and tail feathers to your form. Hold them in place until the glue is holding firmly. When everything is in place, begin to add another layer of papier maché,  covering all the new parts of your bird in addition to adding another layer to the main form you’ve already covered.

IMG_4736_birdybank
As you add paper, make sure to leave the end of the balloon visible; this is where you’ll be breaking the balloon and pulling it out. Paper maché is very forgiving and it’s easy to cover up this hole.

IMG_4742_birdybank
When you’ve covered the form with one or two layers of paper, let it dry again. You may find that you have to stop before you’ve completed covering the whole thing because life gets in the way of your messy fun, or your messy fun become a little too messy. No worries! Just make sure that your paper is as smooth as you can make it, and let the bird rest.

Step Three: Removing the Balloon and Making this Guy a Bank

IMG_4743_birdybank
Yes. It looks silly. That’s okay, the best things are silly. When your form is completely dry, you’re ready to remove your balloon. Gently grip the balloon’s knot, and pierce the balloon to let the air out. As it shrinks, it should pull away from your paper. If it sticks in a spot, gently pull it out of the hole.

IMG_4754_birdybank
No bank is complete without a place to put the money. Mark a line down the back of your bird, between the wings, about 1/4″ wide and 1.5″ long. Use a craft knife to carefully trim out the piece you’ve marked.

To finish the bottom of the bank, you have a couple of options. You can either add an access hole for money to be removed or go with the ol’ piñata method– keep the money inside until it’s time to smash! (Which is definitely satisfying.)

IMG_4747_birdybank
If you’d like to make your bank reusable, find a small lid or something else that would work as a plug. Trace around the shape and cut any extra paper. It you’re having trouble keeping the cover in, trace it onto a scrap of chipboard and make a ring the perfect size, then glue that on top of your form and cover it with paper. The chipboard with provide a little extra stability. (Yes, I know this all looks kinda amusing. Giggles are allowed.)

Step Four: The last of the Papier Maché

IMG_4760_birdybank
If your form is feeling pretty secure, it’s time to start adding the last layer of papier maché. The paint will not completely cover the paper (unless you want it to) so this is a great time to start having fun with your paper color and prints. Save gold and orange colored paper for the beak, cover the wings and head in dark colors, and use white newsprint for the breast. When you’re happy with the way it looks, let it all dry overnight!

Step Five: Sanding and Painting

IMG_4763_birdybank
If you’re anything like me, your form will need a little sanding. USe sand paper or a sanding block to smooth off any edges of paper, clumps of paste, or rough edges- making sure not to sand below your papier mache layers.

IMG_4765_birdybank
To make a transparent paint layer, mix equal parts glue and white acrylic paint with a little water.  (Add more glue for more transparency, or more paint to cover the paper more opaquely.)

IMG_4772_birdybank
Gently apply a layer of paint and glue to the whole form and let it dry.

IMG_4790_birdybank
When it dries you will still be able to see a lot of your newspaper pattern. If you like, add another layer of white paint, or start to add more colors to bring out details. To keep some of the transparency, you can water down your colored paints and streak them across your form.

IMG_4955_birdybank
Let it all dry, and get ready to fill it with money!

IMG_4976_birdybank
Using this balloon method you can make pretty much any animal you want! I’d love to see!

DIY: Turn a Tea Towel into the Simplest Apron

IMG_4401_teatowelapron
My cooking style is much like a cartoon: with ingredients flying everywhere, sauces spilling across every surface, and flour covering every inch of my clothing.

Aprons and abundant cleaning cloths are an absolute necessity. Since I like to cook my aprons need frequent washing, so I set out to make one to spare from a fun tea towel. (Before you ask, this lovely tea towel is from Seattle local Sunday Drive Designs.)

IMG_4029_teatowelapron

SUPPLIES

  • One pre-washed and lightly ironed tea towel
  • About 3 yards of fabric ribbon
  • Corresponding thread
  • Straight pins
  • Scissors
  • A sewing machine or hand needles

IMG_4053_teatowelapron
This design breaks down very simply into a tie around your waist, and a loop around the back of your neck.

Start by holding the tea towel up in front of you, and marking with a straight pin where your natural waist is. (For me, it was about 1/3 of the way from the top of the tea towel, at about 9″.) Cut a length of about 2 yards from your ribbon, and pin it across your tea towel at the point you marked.

IMG_4055_teatowelapron
Cut two more lengths of ribbon, on 12″ long and one 24″ long. One each piece, fold about 1″ underneath, and pin to one of the upper corners of the tea towel.

IMG_4056_teatowelapron
Now to the sewing! I used a straight stitch on my machine to attach the ribbons to the tea towel (which I show below) but if you don’t have a machine, don’t fret! You can hand stitch these pieces on without too-much trouble, just give yourself a little time.

IMG_4072_teatowelapron
If you’re using a machine, follow the waist tie with a straight stitch, about 1/4″ from the edges.

IMG_4064_teatowelapron
Then tack the neck straps on each side. (I stitched an “X” shape across the tab for reinforcement.)

With all the ribbon ties attached, slip on the apron and tie the pieces.(The knot of the neck strap will be on one side, since one strip is longer than the other.) Check the length of all the pieces, and trim the ends off of any of the pieces that are way too long. Make sure not to trim any of the pieces too short! You might want to share the apron with someone who is a different size.

Once the pieces are trimmed, take off the apron to finish the edges of the ribbon.

IMG_4081_teatowelapron
Fold about 3/4″ of the ribbon under, then fold again to hide the raw edge of the ribbon. Pin it flat, and repeat on all of the raw edges.

IMG_4082_teatowelapron
Finish by stitching the fold down on each end. Bang! Done.

IMG_4413_teatowelapron
Super simple (and cute) protection from dangerous food-shrapnel.
No more will people know everything about you by the stains on your clothing. You can hide those stains on an apron instead.

IMG_4398_teatowelapron
Sneaky.

DIY: Season’s Greetings Printable Herb Packet Gift

Season's Greetings Printable Herb Packet Gift Idea
I recently created this fun holiday printable idea for Garden Therapy and thought I would share it here on A.I.M for you to enjoy! -Rachel

Quick and easy holiday gifts are essential for surviving the holiday season. This free printable “Season’s Greetings” Herb Packet is perfect for small gifts and can easily fit into the mail with your holiday greeting cards! Use herbs harvested from your own garden to create flavorful seasoning mixes paired with a simple and delicious recipe.

CLICK HERE to for the full tutorial and free printable download over at Garden Therapy!

Season's Greetings Printable Herb Packet Gift Idea

RECIPE: Lemon Thyme Salt

RECIPE: Lemon Thyme Salt #seasoning #homemade
Earlier this week I shared a sweet recipe for infusing sugar. Today I’m going to share a savory recipe for one of my favorite seasonings, salt! My thyme plant has become a bit unruly in my garden so I decided to prune and harvest some to make a seasoning salt. Lemon has become one of my favorite flavors and it pairs perfectly with fresh thyme so I knew I had to try this recipe from Have Cake, Will Travel.

RECIPE: Lemon Thyme Salt #seasoning #homemade

Lemon Thyme Salt
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Seasoning
Serves: Approx. ½ cup
Ingredients
  • ½ cup fine grain sea salt
  • Zest from 2 medium organic lemons
  • Leaves from approximately 20 fresh thyme sprigs
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1½ teaspoons onion powder
Instructions
  1. Combine ingredients in a food processor or clean coffee grinder and pulse several thymes until well blended. The more you pulse, the finer your salt will become.
  2. Store in an airtight container. Will keep at room temperature indefinitely.

I love using this salt to season chicken, fish or spring veggies. You can use it instead of normal salt anytime you think the flavors of lemon and thyme would enhance your dish.

RECIPE: Lemon Thyme Salt #seasoning #homemade

May DIY Challenge: Flowers

May DIY Challenge: Flowers! #craft #diycraftchallenge #spring
Sources left to right: Fabric Covered Flower Pots by Ashley Ann, Pom Pom Bouquet by Camille Styles, Pressed Flowers by Sweet Paul, Paper Ranunculi by Brit+Co, Seed Starts in Cupcake Tins by Tuinieren, Spring Paper Flower Garland by Lia Griffith, Edible Flower Cookies by Pretty Prudent, Felt Roses by Pretty Petals, Book Paper Flowers by 100 Layer Cake, Spring Flower Bowls by Martha Stewart, Spring Kitten Flower Cookies by Lookie Boo, Pretty Lace Flower Pots by A Beautiful Mess.

May DIY Challenge: Flowers

This month we are officially celebrating the spring season with Flowers! Flowers are such a beautiful, versatile subject so we are excited to see what YOU make this month. Whether you are planting seeds in your garden, baking flower cookies for a party or making a flower inspired art or craft project, we invite you to share it with us!

HOW TO ENTER

Click here for details on how to enter your project to the DIY Challenge! Don’t forget to share your projects with everyone on Instagram using #diycraftchallenge.

The challenge officially begins today, May 1, 2015 and ends on May 29th, 2015. We will post our favorite projects + announce the award winners on May 31st. Have fun and happy crafting!

Need more inspiration?

Take a look out our Pinterest board for more flower inspired project ideas.

DIY: Simple Handmade Paper Heart Cards with Flower Seeds Inside

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7950
The sun has made a couple of appearances, and when the sun comes out all I want to do is make paper. Why fight it?

I decided to take the opportunity to make a bunch of plantable heart cards, using flower seeds and a simple pour-over paper making method (instead of my usual dip method featured here and here.) The pour-over method uses paper scraps and things that you probably have around the house; making this an awesome, kid-friendly, activity for a sunny afternoon.
plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7759

Pour-over Paper Making Supplies

• Shredded scrap paper Mix your favorite color and white paper for the best results. You can use a shredder, scissors, or your hands to tear the paper into manageable bits.
• Smallish flower seeds I felt several packets of seeds before settling on a combination of chamomile, viola, and alyssum seeds. You can also give it a cooking theme by using tiny herb seeds.
• A “Deckle”- This will be the template for your sheet of paper. I used an inexpensive, wood, heart-shaped picture frame that I picked up at the craft store.
• 2 screens, slightly larger than your deckle- I used small pieces of window screen material from the hardware store. I have also had some luck with sheer curtain material and other porous fabrics.
• A blender
• A large bowl (or two)
• A wire cooling rack for support
• A rectangular cake pan to catch the runoff.
• A sponge or absorbent rag
• A couple of flat absorbent rags larger than your intended paper size.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7797

Step 1: Making Paper Pulp

To make the pulp for your paper, first soak the shredded paper in water for a little bit. Typically I will dunk them all in water while I’m getting all my supplies together. Once they are saturated put a handful into your blender, with about twice that amount of water.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7808
Then pulse your blender to pulverize the paper pulp. (If you feel like your blender is having trouble, add more water to your mix. The paper pulp quickly becomes thick sludge that’s harder to cut through. It’s better to err on the side of too much water.) When your mix is starting to look like a disgusting smoothie, open it up and take a look at the mix. I like to stop when the mix is a little bit chunky, but mostly liquified.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7809

Step 2: Preparing your Mould

Stack the cooling rack, screen, and deckle on top of your cake pan. This is where you’ll be pouring your pulp in a minute.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7816

Step 3: Mixing in the wildflower seeds.

Transfer your pulp from the blender to a pouring bowl. You will be using several batches of pulp, so pour just a little bit of your flower seed into the bowl and stir gently with your fingers.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7819

Step 4: Pouring the Pulp

Slowly pour your pulp mixture into the deckle. The water from the pulp will run through the screen and leave you with saturated paper fibers in the shape of your deckle.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7822
Fill the space completely by pouring, and (if needed) gently pushing the pulp into the corners of the frame with your finger.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7824
Very gently, lift the deckle directly up towards the ceiling. (A note: One of the best parts about paper-making is that almost any mess up can be fixed by dumping the sheet back into the pulpy water, breaking it up with your hand, and starting over again. So if your shape doesn’t look right, or your get a tear or a bubble, just dump it back in and try again!) You will have a nice pile of wet paper mess.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7825

Step 5: Drying the Paper

The final bits are all about drying the paper. Although much of the water falls through while you’re pouring, the fibers hold on to a lot of moisture. First, place your second piece of screen on top of the pulp and absorb as much of the water as you can by pressing gently with a sponge. This will flatten the pulp into something that looks more like a sheet of paper. (You can wring the sponge out into your pulp bowl, and dump the excess water in there that runs into your cake pan.)

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7836
The sheet is still delicate at this point.
plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7841
Transfer it to a flat absorbent rag by flipping the whole screen onto the rag, and gently peeling back just the screen.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7848
Next, place another rag on top, and press the paper gently with your fingers or a rolling-pin. You should start to see water in the shape of your card.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7850
Use the same flipping method to transfer your sheet onto a surface that it can remain on to air dry. (I like to cover my dining table with bath towels.) Once you’re done making paper, you can dump the remaining pulp and water outside.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7854

See! Paper!

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7881

An army of plantable paper hearts!

Usually the paper will dry overnight, but may take a little more time in a damp or cold room. Once they are completely dry, you can decorate them however you please.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7890
Since Mother’s Day is coming up, I decided to use one of my sheets as a card. I used the seed packets as inspiration and wrote a little message on the back, including directions for planting the card.

When you’re ready to toss out this card, plant it instead! It has a mix of viola, alyssum, and chamomile seeds– just cover with a little soil, water, and you might find yourself  with a few new blooms.

Since every card needs an envelope, I decided to make a simple one from a paper grocery bag.

Simple Envelope Supplies

• A paper bag
• Your handmade paper deckle
• A Pencil
• A Ruler
• Scissors or craft knife
• Glue

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7905

Step 1

Open up the paper bag by cutting until you have a flat sheet. Place the deckle in the center and trace the inside with your pencil.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7908

Step 2

To make your envelope guide, draw a box around your deckle shape, leaving about a quarter of an inch of space on each side. Extend the lines out from the box (as shown above).

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7911

Step 3

Cut the corner portions out of the form you drew, leaving a plus sign shape with your heart-shape in the center. Fold along each of the straight lines, and trim the flaps so that they overlap about a half an inch.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7915

Step 4

Fold in one of the side flaps, then apply glue to the other side flap, fold it over, and do the same with the bottom flap.

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7928
You should have the perfect envelope for your card! Just slip it in, seal the last flap and send it to somebody special. (Remember that oddly shaped envelopes require more postage. Check with your post office for more details.)

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7964

plantable_handmade_paper_hearts_IMG_7967

I’m really happy with the way my card turned out, and glad that I was able to come up with another way to recycle materials I had already.

Now I have a nice stack of paper hearts packed full of flower seeds- what should I do with the rest of them?

 

10 Handmade Mother’s Day Gift Ideas

Mother’s Day is coming up and that means it’s time to start brainstorming gift ideas. We believe the best gifts are handmade (especially when they’re for mom). We’ve dug through our archives and gathered 10 DIY projects we know our moms would love to receive. We hope you’ll find inspiration in these ideas and make something your mom will truly love and appreciate!

1. Sweet Slumber Tea Blend

Because who can resist a hot cup of their favorite tea. Mix together a custom blend using your mother’s favorite herbs!
sweet-slumber-tea-5

2. ‘Cat Nap’ Eye Pillow

Every mother needs time to rest and relax. Help her find peace of mind with her very own eye pillow. Bonus: Cat loving moms everywhere will love this!
DIY: 'Cat Nap' Eye Pillows + Free Sewing Pattern #craft #herbal

3. Pressed Herb Candle

Make a beautiful pressed-herb candle using your mother’s favorite scents.
DIY: Pressed Herb Candles #gift #handmade

4. Hand-Printed Gift Wrap

You’ve found the perfect gift, all you need now is the perfect wrapping. Add some extra love and make your own hand-printed gift wrap.
Hand-Printed Gift Wrap

5. Paper Fringe Flowers

Who doesn’t love flowers? Try making these paper fringe flowers using recycled materials and show mom how resourceful you are.
DIY Fringe Flowers

6. Mermaid Bath Salts

Bath salts are easy to make and give. Pair it with a bottle of her favorite wine and she can enjoy an ultimate night of pampering. Earn extra brownie points by offering to clean her bath tub!
DIY: Mermaid Bath Salts

7. Strawberry Pin Cushion

The perfect gift for any quilter. You could also fill it with herbs to make a sachet!
Handmade Strawberry Pin Cushions #sewing #gift

8. Herbal Sachets

Speaking of sachets….
DIY: Herbal Sachet Pillow + Free Sewing Pattern #tutorial #spring #craft

9. Heart-shape Soy Candles

Because you can never have too many. Show mom some love with a heart-shaped soy candle.
DIY Heart Soy Candles

10. Love Letter Book

Bring a tear of joy to your mother’s eye with a sweet little book of thank you’s just for her.
DIY Love Letter Book

DIY: Quick and Easy Faux-Etched Letter Frame

IMG_6714
I love the look of etched glass, but I try not to use my dremel on anything too delicate. When I rediscovered this awesome Window Film I knew exactly the project I wanted to do.

Want to make you own?
IMG_6653

Supplies

• Etched Glass Window Film: The version linked here uses water to cling to glass, which makes it repositionable, removable, and amazing.
• A printout of the letter you want to use.
• Transfer paper (or any other means of getting the design on the backer)
• A craft knife
• A frame with glass or plexiglass

IMG_6655First cut off a small piece of the film, remove the backer, and set aside. Lay your letter template on top of the backer with a piece of transfer paper in the middle. Hold your stack firmly and trace all the way around the letter.

IMG_6656
When you have your design on the backer, reattach the film by smoothing it down with your thumbnail until it it well attached. Using the template lines you can see through the film, cut the design out carefully with a craft knife, then remove the backer.

IMG_6661
Follow the instructions included with your film to attach it to the frame’s glass. (I put a thin layer of water down on the glass, laid the letter down, and used my nail to smooth out all the bubbles.)

IMG_6691
Voila! Quick and easy “etched” decoration for your picture frame.

IMG_6692 IMG_6717What’re you doing with letters?