DIY: Patio Friendly Pile-Up Cushions filled with Styrofoam Peanuts

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The weather was nice for a few days in April, uncharacteristically, and began the countdown to the Pacific Northwest Summer. Ahhh; the handful of blissful weeks that makes you fall in love with the trees again, and wipes the memory of the last 8 gray months.

Safety Husband and I have been trying to be more mindful, and that extends to the way we interact with our home. We are who we are [not catalog people] and we want everything at our house to be conducive to the way we live. (Safety Husband is really into Ham Radio, so he would also like to make a great deal of the house conductive*, but that’s a different story.) We have several outdoor areas that would make great external living spaces, but we haven’t done a great job of outfitting them for the task.

All this to explain why I decided I needed to make a giant pile of outdoor cushions that I could lay upon like the Princess and the Pea. I wanted them to be cheap, washable, refurbishable, and also work with our inside decor. Fabric and wood don’t do well outside over the Seattle winter, and I can’t store things in out non-existent storage space. So I put together a handful of pillow forms from scrap material, filled with recycled styrofoam peanuts; then covered them with painted canvas covers. In one afternoon I had 7 assorted cushions, and dreams of the perfect summer.

SUPPLIES

  • Fabric scissors and optional pinking shears
  • Sewing machine and thread
  • Pillow Form Fabric: approximately 24″ (2/3 yard) of 45″-wide lightweight scrap fabric per pillow
  • Pillow Cover: approximately 24″ (2/3 yard) of 52″ to 60″-wide canvas-type material per pillow
  • Styrofoam Peanuts: about a grocery sack full per pillow. Make sure that you are using styrofoam peanuts instead of the cornstarch ones that melt under water. Imagine the mess!

DECORATING SUPPLIES

  • Tulip Color Shot Fabric Color:  I used Teal, Blue, and Green.
  • Scissors
  • Tape: masking, packing, cello, washi. Whatever you want!
  • Con-Tact Paper: A great option for cutting out larger masks or covering more material.
  • Decorative punches and scissors
  • Compass, or fun shapes to trace

 

Step 1: Making the Pillow Forms

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Take your scrap pillow-form material and fold it so that the selvedged edges touch. Cut the other two sides with pinking shears so that you have an approximately 23″ square (45″x23″ unfolded.) Sew a 1/2″ seam along the two pinked edges, then do the same for about half of the remaining side.

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Fill the form about halfway full with peanuts, then sew the opening closed to seal your pillow form.

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Hire a professional to test the security of your stitching.

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Repeat until you have run out of material. (I made 7 pillows so that I could make a GIANT PILE.)

Step 2: Making the Pillow Covers

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There is dirt outside, so you want to make sure that your pillow cover can be easily removed and laundered; this also means you want to pre-wash your fabrics so there is no future shrinkage.

Cut your fabric to about 23″ wide. With the back side showing, fold the width of the fabric into a tube about 22″ wide. The overlapped pieces will make the flap for inserting and removing your pillow form.

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Stitch up the two open ends of your tube approximately 1/4″ in.

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Then turn the cover inside out using the open flaps. Make sure to press the corner all the way out with your finger or a pencil.

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Stitch around the outside edges of your pillow cover, about 3/8″ in- then you’re done!

Step 3: Decorating the Cushions to Match your Life.

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Decorating the pillows was definitely the biggest fun in this project (other than sitting in the sun on the cushions later.) If you’re a selfless person, you could share that fun with your family and friends, and let each person design a mask for their own pillow. Masking the pillow is as easy as using tape and scissors. Build shapes out of strips of tape, or cut shapes out of contact paper. (ABOVE: I used a compass to draw circles, then cut and arranged them on the front of my cover.) You could have the initials of everyone in your family, silhouettes of your pets and favorite animals… anything really.

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Once you’ve settled on a masked design, take it outside and spray it down with your fabric spray paint. (I used Tulip Color Shot Fabric Color which is washable and flexible.) Remember that spray paint doesn’t ever go on consistently, so embrace the irregularity and leave some patches lighter than others.

After you’ve got a nice coat of paint on, let your cover dry for an hour or so before pulling off the mask.

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Then let your covers air out for a few more hours.

When everything is dry (not sticky or smelly) you can put your pillow forms into your covers. Slip the form into the open flap, then push it down under the inner over-lapping flap. Press the corners of the form into the corners of the cover and shake and stomp it until everything looks nice.

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Then build the tower of pillow on which you will reign.

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Or, you know. Share with your friends.

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Wheeee! Pillows.

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*I have a feeling that SH will have something to say about this line in the post when and if he reads it, so I’m going to put a disclaimer- like all nerdy types, there is typically a method to his madness, so I am sure the most of the house will remain non-conductive, or resistive, or whatever. Just, you know, antennas. He likes antennas.

RECIPE: Pansy Shortbread Cookies

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Do you believe in magic? Ever since I was a little girl, I’ve loved reading stories of the fairy folk living in an enchanted forest, playing with the animals, and sipping tea from rosebud tea cups. If I were ever invited to join them, I’d bring these Pansy Shortbread Cookies to share.

Inspired by the wonders of nature and the magic that can be found within it, I decided to make a batch of cookies fit for fairyland. This recipe is simple to make and so pretty! Make it your own (or please the fairies in your own backyard) by changing up the ingredients to suite your favorite flavors. I chose to make a lavender lemon shortbread cookie using lavender-infused sugar and dried lavender harvested from my garden. You could also try these Lemon Thyme Shortbread Cookies, these Earl Grey Shortbread Cookies or these Cardamom Orange Zest Shortbread Cookies.

flower-cookies-2Some Tips On Choosing Edible Flowers:

I used a few varieties of pansies that I had growing in my garden but you can experiment with other edible flowers too. Some things to keep in mind…

  • Choose flowers that will fit the shape of the cookie.
  • Only use edible flowers that you can identify correctly
  • Only use edible flowers that are grown organically (pesticide-free).
  • Edible flower suggestions: Chamomile, Johnny-Jump-Ups, Borage, Lavender, Marigolds, Pansies, Rose Petals, Violas, Violets.

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Pansy Shortbread Cookies
 
Author:
Recipe type: Dessert
Serves: 36 Cookies
Ingredients
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup lavender infused sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons dried lavender
  • Zest of one lemon
  • Fresh, organic pansies
  • 1 egg white, beaten
  • Fine sugar (for finishing)
Instructions
  1. Cream the butter with an electric mixer until fluffy. Stir in the flour, sugar and salt; beat on low speed for 1 minute. Crush the dried lavender using a mortar and pestle. Then add the vanilla, lavender and lemon zest to the mixer, beating until just incorporated.
  2. Let the dough chill in the refrigerator for approx. 1 hour. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease baking sheet and set aside.
  3. On a floured surface, roll out the dough to ¼" thickness. Cut out with round or scalloped cookie cutters and place 1" apart onto the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 14-18 minutes, until the cookies begin to turn light golden around the edges and on the bottom. Remove from oven and transfer to wire racks to cool.
  4. Once the cookies are all baked and cooled its time to decorate with flowers! Use a pastry brush to brush a cookie with egg white and place a pansy on top. Then brush the pansy all over with egg white and sprinkle with fine sugar.
  5. Repeat with remaining cookies and return them to the baking sheet. Bake in the oven for another 5 minutes, then transfer to the wire racks to cool.

 
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Serve these at your next tea party or package them up as favors at your next fairytale gathering! And don’t forget to leave a few out in your garden for the fairies to enjoy 🙂
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APRIL DIY Challenge Roundup

Don’t know what it’s like where you are, but in the Pacific Northwest we’ve had a confusing collection of warm sunny days and cold rainy days. The plants seem to like it, though. It looks like spring!

We’re excited to present this little round-up of Garden inspired projects from you (and people just like you).

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Claire made an upcycled window herb planter that has us buzzing.

This craft composed of 2 parts: the first was painting a cheesy pun and some bees onto an old window. The second part was decoupaging some old tin cans with insects to attach to the window and use as a herb planter.

She has provided free templates and instructions to make your own herb window at her blog – Pillar Box Blue.


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Maura, The Messy Brunette, shared these amazing crocheted blooms (and a nest she found in her garden in Ireland).

Weather hasn’t been great here to get out in the garden but I did manage to make some little flowers…


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Spring has long since passed in Córdoba, Argentina; home of Cintia and Sol de Noche {deco crochet}; but she’s bringing a little of the garden in, in a beautiful way.

As Winter is just around the corner here, I decided to bring some of my plants inside. Your theme has given me the chance to recycle some jute I had and leftover yarn in order to create these crochet pot covers.


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Tara submitted a little of her amazing artsiness  (and legendary lettering) in these swoon-worthy practice pieces.

…just experimenting with gouache and brush lettering. 


donna_signDonna sent in this lovely spring wreath.

I wasn’t planning to make a new wreath for our front door this spring, but as the weather got warmer, I decided I wanted something new.  I had an idea and went to the store to buy some pretty artificial flowers, some ribbon, and a wreath form.

She added a welcome sign to the center, and it turned out wonderfully. You can see more photos on her blog.


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Becky Kimberly of Cotswoldcre8 shared these awesome bright fiber flowers.

I’m a self-employed community artist whose been experimenting with gorgeous Marino wool create  to funky 3-D blooms!


I love finishing the roundup with a project that reminds me of the next theme, too! Rachel and I have been hard at work on the May theme, and hope you’ll be happily ever after surprised.

 

 

DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden (Part 2)

DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden tutorial (Part 2)
Stitching up felt veggies has become my newest obsession. They’re easy to make, and so much fun to watch kids play with! Yesterday, I shared PART 1 of this tutorial where we made a garden planter box, tomatoes, strawberries and faux plants for them to ‘grow’ on. Today we’ll be making… you guessed it! More veggies for our play garden!

DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden tutorial (Part 2)

Materials:

• Felt (pinks, purples, greens, and oranges)
• Needle and thread (in coordinating colors)
• Pins and fabric scissors
• Fiberfill
• Pipe cleaners
• Velcro
• Faux greenery (for the ‘plants’)
Free printable pattern

Helpful Links

PART 1 (Tutorials for the planter box, tomatoes, and strawberries)
Felt Cabbage tutorial by Fairfax
Felt Mushroom tutorial by Fairyfox

A special note: There is no right or wrong way to sew any of the felt veggies in this tutorial! You can use a sewing machine, or hand-stitch them all (like I did). My mom and I discovered different ways to make these as we went along and all methods are correct! So if you find your own way, that’s great! And if your tomato turns out a little wonky, even better! Since discovering a ‘real’ odd shape veggie growing in your garden is one of the many pleasures of growing anything.

Step One: Beets!

DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden tutorial (Part 2)

Print out the pattern provided and cut out your pieces from pink and dark green felt. Thread your needle with pink thread and tie a knot at the end.

DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden tutorial (Part 2)

Slightly overlap each edge with the one adjacent and whip stitch together (as shown below in photo 1). Repeat on the other three edges until the beet is sewn all the way around (photo 2). Next, use a straight stitch to sew around the outside of the beet (photo 3). Stuff with fiberfill and cinch the opening closed and set aside (we will cinch closed completely, tie a knot and tie off later) (photo 4).

Now to sew the beet’s stalk and leaves! Cut a length of pipe cleaner and thread a needle with green thread (photo 6). Place the pipe cleaner on top of the green stem and then place a pink stalk on top of the pipe cleaner. Holding all three pieces together, whip stitch around the entire pink stock with the pipe cleaner enclosed inside. Trim any excess pipe cleaner from the bottom (photo 7). Repeat this process for the second leaf/stalk.

Now all we have to do is connect the stalk/leaves to the beet. Insert the stalks into the center of the beet and cinch closed (around the stalks). Make a few stitches back and forth and around the stalks to secure the beet and the stalks tightly together (photo 8). Tie off and you’re done!

DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden tutorial (Part 2)

DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden tutorial (Part 2)

Step Two: Carrots!

DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden tutorial (Part 2)

Cut out the pieces using the pattern provided from orange and light green felt. Thread your needle with orange thread and tie a knot at the end (see photo 1 below). Poke your needle into the tip of the orange triangle and pull through (photo 2). Turn the edges together, with them slightly overlapped, whipstitch all the way up to create the shape of a carrot (photo 3). Stuff the carrot with fiberfill (photo 4) and straight stitch around the top. Insert the leaves and cinch the carrot closed. Make a few small stitches around the base of the leaves to secure together and tie off.

DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden tutorial (Part 2)

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Step Three: Eggplants!

DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden tutorial (Part 2)
Cut out the pieces using the pattern provided, thread your needle with dark color thread and tie a knot at the end (photo 1). Slightly overlap the edges of two purple felt pieces and whip stitch together up one side. Then add the third piece and whipstitch that on so that all three pieces are now connected (photo 2). Next bring the edges together and sew up the last side to create an eggplant shape (photo 3). Stuff with fiberfill, stitch closed and tie off (photo 4).

DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden tutorial (Part 2)

Finally, add the leaf. Thread your needle with green thread and backstitch down the center of each ‘petal’ of the leaf to secure onto the eggplant (photo 5). Cut a small piece of velcro (the soft ‘loop’ side) and stitch it anywhere near the top of the leaf. Repeat to make as many eggplants as you like! (I made three to grow on one plant).

Step Four: Make the Plant!

Just like with the strawberries and tomatoes, I used faux greenery to make a plant for the eggplants to ‘grow’ from. Simply cut off a plant size sprig and stitch little pieces of Velcro (using the ‘hook’ or sticky side) onto the leaves and/or stems. Once you’ve finished adding the Velcro, you are ready to plant your eggplants!
DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden tutorial (Part 2)

DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden tutorial (Part 2)

DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden tutorial (Part 2)

DIY: Plantable Felt Vegetable Garden (Part 1)

Plant the seeds of joyful gardening and teach your child how to tend to their very own felt vegetable garden! This is a great project that can be turned into the ultimate garden playtime complete with a garden planter box, plants, and ‘pickable’ fruits and veggies. Also, don’t forget the play watering can!

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My twin nieces will be two years old this June and I plan on gifting them their own felt garden to play with. I first had the idea last winter and had originally planned to make this as a Christmas gift but with the craziness of the holiday season, I wasn’t able to start working on it until Christmas day! Since then, my mom and I have spent many evenings stitching up these felt veggies. Not only are they simple to make and impossible to ‘mess up’ (since imperfections in homegrown veggies is part of the magic of gardening), these felt veggies are also addicting! Once you stitch up a strawberry, you’ll be hooked by its utter cuteness and want to make more!

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Materials:

• Felt (reds and greens)
• Needle and thread (in coordinating colors)
• Pins and fabric scissors
• Fiberfill
• Embroidery floss (green and white)
• Velcro (loop and hook)
• Brown felt (for the ‘dirt’)
• Wooden crate
• Faux greenery (for the ‘plants’)
Free printable pattern

Step One: Make the planter box

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You’ll need a wooden crate, brown felt (or cotton fabric), and fiberfill. I used a sewing machine to sew the pretend dirt but you could also hand-stitch them together. To create the rows of ‘dirt’, you’ll basically be making four mini bolsters that fit snuggly into the crate.

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Start by cutting two 4 ½” circles (see pattern) and one rectangle 15 1/8” x 11 ¾” in size. Fold the rectangle in half (hamburger style) and sew along the edge leaving approx. 1/2” seem allowance to create a sleeve. Then pin one felt circle to the sleeve with the wrong sides facing out as shown in the photo 2.

Sew all the way around the edge of the circle. Then repeat on the other end, making sure to leave a 2” opening so you can turn the whole thing right side out (see photo 3). Turn right side out and stuff with fiberfill (photo 4). Then hand-stitch the opening closed. Repeat this process to make three more mini bolsters (or however many will fit in your crate).

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A special note: There is no right or wrong way to sew any of the felt veggies in this tutorial! You can use a sewing machine, or hand-stitch them all (like I did). My mom and I discovered different ways to make these as we went along and all methods are correct! So if you find your own way, that’s great! And if your tomato turns out a little wonky, even better! Since discovering a ‘real’ odd shape veggie growing in your garden is one of the many pleasures of growing anything.

Step Two: Tomatoes!

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Print out the pattern provided and cut out your pieces from red and green felt. Thread your needle with red (or pink) thread, and tie a knot at the end (photo 1). Slightly overlap two red pieces and whip stitch them together as shown in photo 2. Then repeat with the other two red pieces. Next, whip stitch the two halves together, leaving a small opening to stuff with fiberfill. Then stitch the opening closed and tie off your thread (photo 3).

tomato-tutorial

Thread a length of green embroidery floss (or green thread works too) and back stitch the leaf to the top of the tomato as shown in photo 4.

Finish up the tomato by adding a stem with a Velcro leaf. Start by threading your needle using green thread and tie a knot at the end (photo 5). Then roll the square end of the stem piece together and stitch closed as shown in photos 6 and 7. Cut a small piece of Velcro (the soft/fuzzy ‘loop’ side) and stitch into the inside of the leaf. You can also trim the length of the stem to your desired length (photo 8).

Lastly, stitch the stem onto the tomato and tie off your thread (photo 9). And that’s it! You’ve made your first tomato! Repeat to make as many as you like (I made three to hang on a single plant).

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Step Three: Strawberries!

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Cut out your pieces using the pattern provided. Then thread your needle with red thread and tie a knot at one end (photo 1). Whip stitch the two red pieces together along the rounded edge only (just like you did with the tomatoes). Then straight stitch around the opening, stuff with fiberfill and pull the threads to cinch the opening closed (photo 2). Tie securely with a knot and tie off.

Next add ‘seeds’ to the strawberry using some white embroidery floss. Start by inserting your threaded needle into the top of the strawberry (the knot will soon be covered up by the top leaf) and make small straight stitches all around the berry (photo 3). When finished, poke the needle back up through the top and tie off. Then, thread your needle with green embroidery floss and sew the leaf onto the top of the berry (making sure to cover the white knots) (photo 4).

strawberry-tutorial

Finally stitch a small piece of Velcro (fuzzy ‘loop’ side) onto the top of the strawberry. And you’re done! Repeat to make as many strawberries as you like! I made 4 berries per plant.

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Step Four: Make the plants!

I used faux greenery to make plants for the tomatoes and strawberries to ‘grow’ from. Simply cut off a plant size sprig and stitch little pieces of Velcro (using the ‘hook’ or sticky side) onto the leaves and/or stems. Once you’ve finished adding the Velcro, you are ready to plant your berries and tomatoes!

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Additional Links:

Here are links to two great tutorials by Fairy Fox that I used to make both the felt cabbages and mushrooms.

Cabbage tutorial
Felt Mushroom tutorial

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Be sure to stay tuned tomorrow for PART 2 of this tutorial where we’ll be making carrots, beets and even eggplants!

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FEATURED MAKER: Stephanie Rose + “Garden Made” Book Giveaway!

Please welcome our newest Featured Maker: Stephanie Rose! Stephanie is a Master Gardener, author and creative mastermind behind her blog, Garden Therapy. Stephanie and I started working together in the blogging world almost five years ago and I am so excited to learn more about her life and work today. She has also graciously offered us a signed copy of her new book, Garden Made to give away to one lucky winner! See details on how to enter at the end of this post…

stephanie-gardentherapy-a5-1600x0Tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from? What is your background?

I’m a Master Gardener, author and the creator of the crafty-gardening blog, Garden Therapy. I make garden projects in my small, urban Vancouver (Canada) garden to show the world that everyone can get a little garden therapy, no matter what your knowledge, skill, ability, or garden size!

What do you make and sell?

I mostly make crafty garden projects as I love to be out in the garden all year long. I also make all my own natural beauty products and soaps, plenty of handmade gifts, and a bunch of healthy recipes from the garden. I don’t sell the products I make, but instead share the DIY instructions so that everyone can learn to make them too. I have over 700 projects on my blog, Garden Therapy that you can browse through, as well as a print book, Garden Made: A Year of Seasonal Projects to Beautify Your Garden and Your Life, and three eBooks:

What made you decide to take the leap and start your own creative business?

In 2006 I had to stop working at my corporate job due to sudden illness. I was hit hard and suffered from crippling pain for many years. After a few years of being confined to bed, I was able to slowly start moving. I used gardening as a way to heal my body and strengthen my mind. I learned to use gardening, photography, and writing as a way to add joy to each and every day.

How did you get started and when did you launch your business?

I began blogging as a way to reach out to others and ease the isolation. I met plenty of lovely people like me and began to share not just what I was making, but HOW I was making it. When I started to feel like I could begin working again, I decided not to go back to the corporate world, but give blogging and writing a shot as a full-time gig. I’m happy to say that it has worked out better than I had hoped! I’m able to work from home, spend time with my family, and do what I love for a living.

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Do you have any philosophies or ideals you try to represent with your work?

I’d like the projects I make to inspire others to try making themselves. While I do really love all the beautiful handmade creations around my home and garden, I love it more when I see that someone has made it for their own home or garden. I know that they are spending their time feeding their creativity and enjoying the garden.

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What’s your process for coming up with ideas for new products?

Generally I have a long list of things I want to make so I gather the materials in my studio and get to them when the time is right. Sometimes that is days, other times it can be years. I may find a birdcage and keep it for 2-3 years before one day turning it into a succulent planter. Or I could see a candle planter at the garden center and rush home to make one that day!

Where do you look for inspiration?

Because I craft from the garden, I look for inspiration on garden tours, garden centers, catalogs, and in parks. I collect materials wherever I go and keep them in my studio until they become something.

What does your workspace/studio look like?

I have a garden full of creative projects and a studio space to store all of my stuff. One day the studio will be set up for more than just storage but until then you can find me out here in my play garden.

Hopscotch Stepping Stones featured in Stephanie's Play Garden

Hopscotch Stepping Stones featured in Stephanie’s Play Garden

What are some of your favorite tools or techniques?

I love to work with outdoor succulents which are colorful and ornamental. I also like to work with lighting in the garden. I’ve made citronella candles out of tin cans, solar lanterns from mason jars, and a little solar chandelier out of a hanging basket.

Tell us about a challenge you’ve overcome in your business? Or something you tried but didn’t work the way you planned?

A few years back I started an Etsy shop to sell some of the things I made and quickly learned that it wasn’t for me. I didn’t like packaging, shipping, and all the non-creative work involved. I enjoyed making the crafts and writing about them so I wrote a number of books to sell instead.

What does a day in the life of Stephanie look like?

About ¼ of my time is gardening & creating, ½ is writing and editing, and ¼ marketing and website housekeeping. I try to spend a little time outdoors or gardening each day to ensure that I continue my recovery and stay healthy.

Visit Stephanie’s blog, Garden Therapy and check out her YouTube Channel!

Thank you so much Stephanie for sharing your story with us! Do you want to be our next Featured Maker? Visit our Contribute Page for more info!


Enter to Win A signed copy of Stephanie’s book!

We are so excited to be giving away a signed copy of Stephanie’s new book, Garden Made: A Year of Seasonal Projects to Beautify Your Garden & Your Life. The giveaway starts today, April 6th and will end on Wednesday, April 13th. We’ll announce the lucky winner on Thursday, April 14th. Just click on the link below to enter. Good luck everyone!

Stephanie's book, Garden Made

Stephanie’s book, Garden Made

CLICK HERE TO ENTER TO WIN!

SHOW+TELL: Hanging Basket Gnome Home

Gardens grow, and so do ideas, so this month is a great time to sit back and realize that some projects keep growing with you, they aren’t just done in one sitting. Some can be done a bit at a time, though, and this fairy garden (AKA Gnome Home) is a great example of a quick project that uses a lot of imagination and a little time.

The inspiration for this garden was a hanging basket that I let wild, which filled up with all sorts of awesome moss. I loved all the textures and colors, and decided that I would express a little whimsy.

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I started collecting bits and baubles from the yard and house. Copper penny steps, a gravel riverbed and a small sparkling glass pond. Piece by piece I placed them into the basket, using a small spoon to pull the moss away as I went.

I put the basket aside for a week, then came back to it when I had time, adding more detail to the door with paint, a button, and some dremel carving.

I also added a swing, because no house is complete without a swing. (My personal motto.)

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All the while I was imagining the little guy who lives in the house, and swings each afternoon- because sometimes it’s fun to let your imagination run wild.

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What’s your most whimsical project?

 

SHOW+TELL: Growing Garden Journal Kit

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I don’t really have a green thumb, so I’m always trying to learn more about my garden in hopes I can make it flourish. This year, in anticipation of spring planting, I am going through my notes and compiling it all in a garden journal. I made a ring-bound set of cards with a thick chipboard cover that can grow with me and with my garden!

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In addition to helpful information fields on the front and the back of each card, I left a little space for a plant doodle or collage.

IMG_5664_growinggardenjournalSince each card is decorated differently, it’s easy to sort through the book and quickly find the plant I’m looking for, plus it’s fun to illustrate the plants. (It would be a great project with the kiddos.)

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I decorated the book cover with scraps from my seed packets and collage materials. (Waste not, want not!)

I’m excited to add more layers and more pages as I go along, and I thought I’d make up a few kits in case anyone wants to follow along with their own gardening adventures.

You can find a kit on the Adventures-in-Making etsy shop – here
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April Growing Garden Journal Includes:

  • Punched Chipboard Cover pieces (labeled “Growing Garden Journal”)
  • 15 front/back printed and punched plant cards on assorted cardstock
  • 1 binder ring
  • Additional plant cards are available as a refill.

Garden Journal Kits and Refills available here.

All you need is a pen and some plants to write about!

The April DIY Craft Challenge Is “In The Garden”

Thank you to everyone who participated in last month’s DIY Craft Challenge! We just love seeing the awesome things you all make and feel so inspired by the ‘bird’ themed submissions we received. Be sure to check out our roundup post of what everyone made here!

Play In The Dirt

Spring is here, the sun is shining, and we’re taking inspiration from our own backyards this month! The theme for April is “In The Garden” so we invite you all to go outside, find inspiration in your surroundings and make something inspired by the seeds you plant, the flowers you pot, and the creativity you grow.

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April DIY Craft Challenge at Adventures-in-making.com

Inspiration Sources

1. Incremental Mini-Garden by No Linde
2. DIY Stamped Spoon Plant Markers by Intimate Weddings
3. Hopscotch Garden Stepping Stones by Garden Therapy
4. Springtime Tic-Tac-Toe by Chicken Scratch NY
5. Ombre Herb Garden Markers by Humble Beads Jewelry
6. DIY Modern Neon Concrete Block Planter by Modernly Wed
7. Illustration by Sanna Mander
8. Chalkboard Clay Pot Herb Garden by The Robin’s Nest
9. Herb Embroidery by Onoe Megumi
10. Moss Hearts by Alissa Burke
11. Pansy Shortbread Cookies by The Cafe Sucre Farine
12. DIY River Rock Garden Markers by West Valley Moms Blog

HOW TO ENTER

Click here for details on how to enter your project to the DIY Challenge! Don’t forget to share your projects with everyone on Instagram using #diycraftchallenge.

The challenge officially begins today, April 1st and ends on April 27th, 2016. We will post a roundup of everyone’s projects on April 30th. Have fun and happy crafting!

Need more inspiration?

Take a look out our Pinterest board for more stitch inspired project ideas.

Have a great weekend! We’ll be back on Monday with our own “Garden” themed projects to share 🙂

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment
Homemade mustard has been on my to-do list since last spring and I’m excited to finally make up a small batch. Since starting my herb garden this year, I’ve been keeping my eye out for new ways to harvest and use fresh herbs. This recipe from Wonky Wonderful made for a great starting point. I followed her basic guidelines and made some of my own alterations to suite my own tastes.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment

The first step is to soak your mustard seed over night. I combined 1/4 cup mustard seed, with a 1/4 cup filtered water and 1/4 cup four thieves vinegar (you can also use raw apple cider vinegar) in a small mason jar and set it in the refrigerator overnight.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment

The next morning, the mustard seed will have absorbed most of the liquid and be ready to prepare with the rest of the ingredients.

Pour the soaked mustard seed (and remaining liquid) into a food processor and add the following: 2 teaspoons lemon juice, 3 tablespoons honey (add more for a sweeter mustard flavor), 1/2 teaspoon turmeric, 1/4 teaspoon sea salt, and about 1 tablespoon fresh herbs. I also sprinkled in a few red pepper flakes.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

You can use any variety of herbs you like. I chose a few sprigs each of fresh thyme, oregano, parsley, rosemary and marjoram from my garden.

Once you’ve added all the ingredients, puree until you get a nice consistency. Transfer back into a clean mason jar and store in the refrigerator.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

This mustard will keep in the refrigerator for up to 4 weeks. I can’t wait to try it on my next ham sandwich!

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

Garden Herb Mustard
 
Author:
Recipe type: Condiment
Serves: About 1 cup
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup mustard seed
  • ¼ cup raw apple cider vinegar (I used four thieves vinegar)
  • ¼ cup filtered water
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon fresh herbs
Instructions
  1. Combine the mustard seed, vinegar, and water in a small jar and refrigerate overnight.
  2. Pour soaked mustard seed (and remaining liquid) into a food processor and add the remaining ingredients. Puree to desired consistency. Taste and add more honey or herbs if desired.
  3. Store in a clean mason jar. Refrigerate and use within 3-4 weeks.

 

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs