DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Watercolor Feather (For Beginners)

watercolor-feather-19b

Can you believe it’s almost spring? Here in Portland, the rain clouds have been taking more frequent breaks to let the sun shine and people are preparing their gardens for the new year. One rainy afternoon I felt the urge to get out my watercolors and play. I had fun experimenting with a favorite subject (one that fits our DIY Craft Challenge theme this month), FEATHERS and decided to share a few of my favorite ways to paint one.

This is a great project for those who are just learning how to use watercolors. Be sure to check out my other posts on Watercolor Basic Supplies & Techniques and 8 Watercolor Techniques For Beginners.

Materials Needed:

• Watercolor paper
• Watercolor paints
• Small + medium size brushes
• Black fine tip pen (I use 0.3 Copic Multi Liner)
• Pencil
• White gouache
• Sea salt
• Feathers (for inspiration)

Prep Your Paper & Sketch

Start by cutting your watercolor paper to three pieces of equal size (I cut mine to be 4″ x 6″). OR you can simply paint all three feathers onto the same page. Then lightly sketch a feather shape with pencil. To do this, first draw an elongated oval shape. Then sketch a straight line down the middle (this will be the stem).
DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Watercolor Feather

METHOD #1: Color Wash + Black Pen

Start by creating a color wash within the feather shape. To do this, first paint your feather shape with a thin layer of clear water only.
DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather
Then prep a few colors by wetting the pigment with water. While the feather shape is still wet, use your brush to drop color randomly onto the wetted surface (I like to use two or three colors for this). Allow the paint to flow together. You can even lift your paper slightly to help it run together.

DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

OPTIONAL: Wait a minute or two, and while the paint is still wet, sprinkle some sea salt over the top. Let dry completely, then brush off any remaining salt from the paper.

DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

Once dry you can decide whether or not you want to do a second color wash layer. I chose to add some more red/orange paint to the bottom of my feather to achieve a darker, more vibrant hue. Don’t forget to paint a stem!

DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

Next get out a fine tipped black felt pen. I use a 0.3 Copic Multi Liner. First draw two lines down the center. You want the lines to come to a point near the top of the feather to create the stem. Next you can begin drawing lines from the stem starting and at the top of the feather and working your way down.

DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

Experiment with leaving space between the lines at different intervals. You could also try different mark making techniques like dots, dashed lines, or even illustrated patterns.

TIP: If drawing with pen directly onto your watercolor feather is too nerve-wrecking, you can lightly sketch your lines with pencil first and then go over with pen.

DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

METHOD #2: Color Wash + Watercolor Details

Start by sketching your feather shape. I chose to sketch my stem in an arc/curve shape this time. Then create a light color wash by first painting the feather shape with a thin layer of clear water and then dropping paint at random onto the wetted surface.

DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

TIP: To paint a lighter shade color wash, all you have to do as add more water to your paint to dilute the pigment.

DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

OPTIONAL: Because I like texture, I chose to sprinkle some sea salt over the color wash (just like in Method #1). Let dry completely, then brush off any remaining salt.

DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

Next create a second layer with feathery details. First choose a darker color (I chose a dark green) to paint the stem.
DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

Using a small brush, begin to paint whispy lines starting at the stem going out to the edge of your color wash. Experiment by using a few different colors of the same hue.

DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

Once you complete your second whispy layer, you can continue to add more color or detail (while the paint is still wet) until you achieve a look you like. Once finished, let dry completely.

DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather
DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

METHOD #3: Color Wash + Gouache Details

Sketch your feather. This time I chose to create a slightly more detailed sketch. Start with the basic feather shape and then using your actual feather as inspiration, lightly draw ‘more wild’ feather shape.

DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

Fill the feather shape with a color wash the same way we did in the last two methods. Paint the shape with clear water and then use your brush to drop in color at random.

DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

Then while the paint is till wet, choose a darker color and add in some stripes. Do this by dropping in the dark color in intervals, leaving gaps in between each ‘stripe’. You can keep adding color until you get a look you like. Then let dry completely.

DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

Then add some white gouache to your palette and using a fine tip brush, paint a line down the center of the feather and add in some white dots. Let dry and you’re done!

DIY: Three Ways To Paint A Feather

Three ways To Paint A Feather

DIY: Turn a Tea Towel into the Simplest Apron

IMG_4401_teatowelapron
My cooking style is much like a cartoon: with ingredients flying everywhere, sauces spilling across every surface, and flour covering every inch of my clothing.

Aprons and abundant cleaning cloths are an absolute necessity. Since I like to cook my aprons need frequent washing, so I set out to make one to spare from a fun tea towel. (Before you ask, this lovely tea towel is from Seattle local Sunday Drive Designs.)

IMG_4029_teatowelapron

SUPPLIES

  • One pre-washed and lightly ironed tea towel
  • About 3 yards of fabric ribbon
  • Corresponding thread
  • Straight pins
  • Scissors
  • A sewing machine or hand needles

IMG_4053_teatowelapron
This design breaks down very simply into a tie around your waist, and a loop around the back of your neck.

Start by holding the tea towel up in front of you, and marking with a straight pin where your natural waist is. (For me, it was about 1/3 of the way from the top of the tea towel, at about 9″.) Cut a length of about 2 yards from your ribbon, and pin it across your tea towel at the point you marked.

IMG_4055_teatowelapron
Cut two more lengths of ribbon, on 12″ long and one 24″ long. One each piece, fold about 1″ underneath, and pin to one of the upper corners of the tea towel.

IMG_4056_teatowelapron
Now to the sewing! I used a straight stitch on my machine to attach the ribbons to the tea towel (which I show below) but if you don’t have a machine, don’t fret! You can hand stitch these pieces on without too-much trouble, just give yourself a little time.

IMG_4072_teatowelapron
If you’re using a machine, follow the waist tie with a straight stitch, about 1/4″ from the edges.

IMG_4064_teatowelapron
Then tack the neck straps on each side. (I stitched an “X” shape across the tab for reinforcement.)

With all the ribbon ties attached, slip on the apron and tie the pieces.(The knot of the neck strap will be on one side, since one strip is longer than the other.) Check the length of all the pieces, and trim the ends off of any of the pieces that are way too long. Make sure not to trim any of the pieces too short! You might want to share the apron with someone who is a different size.

Once the pieces are trimmed, take off the apron to finish the edges of the ribbon.

IMG_4081_teatowelapron
Fold about 3/4″ of the ribbon under, then fold again to hide the raw edge of the ribbon. Pin it flat, and repeat on all of the raw edges.

IMG_4082_teatowelapron
Finish by stitching the fold down on each end. Bang! Done.

IMG_4413_teatowelapron
Super simple (and cute) protection from dangerous food-shrapnel.
No more will people know everything about you by the stains on your clothing. You can hide those stains on an apron instead.

IMG_4398_teatowelapron
Sneaky.

DIY: Photo Album Pop-up Ornaments


Okay. I’ll admit it. I have possibly been making too many ornaments.

The floor is covered in little bits of paper, the ribbons are everywhere, and cat is oh so happy. (Happy and thus in the background of many of my photos.) I can’t help it. I’ve given myself over to the ornament bug, and even though I’ve told myself that these are ‘just this year’s ornaments’, I’m not sure I’ll have the self control to throw them all away.

I need a crafter help line… or maybe I can just spread the decoration disease and have you all join me in the madness. (*evil laughter*)

My sister recently handed over a large bag of family photos, and after the proper period of mortification I decided that I needed to do something with them. The best part about being in charge of photo projects is that you can include only adorable pictures of yourself, and edit out the slightly more awkward times.

I pulled together a selection of photos of family that yelled “HAPPY HOLIDAYS, Y’ALL!” Scanned and shrank them, then pulled out a few basic tools to turn the faces I love into ornaments I’ll cherish.

IMG_3792_photoalbumornaments

SUPPLIES

  • Resized photos printed on medium-heavy weight paper
  • Extra colored paper or cardstock
  • Medium to large hole punches– any symmetrical shape will work, I used circles and ovals
  • Ribbon or string
  • Buttons, bells, or beads
  • Paper glue or adhesive

IMG_3802_photoalbumornaments
To begin I punched my favorite people out of my favorite photos, and the same number of circles out of cardstock. Then I chose between 4 and 6 of my favorites, the same number of solid circles, and folded each in half– top to bottom.

IMG_3806_photoalbumornaments
I chose a button than matched my cardstock, then cut about 16 inches of string and fed it through the button.

IMG_3811_photoalbumornaments
I used my Scotch ATG gun to apply adhesive to each folded piece (glue works too).

IMG_3817_photoalbumornaments
I attached each piece to the one before it in a stack, alternating photos and cardstock. (Make sure that you don’t accidentally glue your sister in upside-down. She wouldn’t like that. All photos should point the same way.)

IMG_3823_photoalbumornaments
I laid the string and button across the spine of my stack (button on the bottom), added a little adhesive to one of the folded pieces, and attached the top and bottom piece to form a ball shape.

IMG_3825_photoalbumornaments
Then I fed another button on above the ball, tied a knot, and fluffed open all the pages.

IMG_3827_photoalbumornaments
I love how simple they look from far away, but each page is a memory of the holidays and of my family.

IMG_3842_photoalbumornaments
I did a few variations, using different punches, and combining shapes on one ribbon; but they are all put together the same way which means I could spend more time remembering good times than obsessing over the process.


It also means it’s a great project for kids, who might get a thrill out of punching holes out of photos.
IMG_3898_photoalbumornaments
and keeping them forever.

DIY: Finger Crochet a Round T-shirt Rag Rug

IMG_2201_roundtshirtrug
Despite my sister’s best efforts I’ve never been able to make sense of real crochet. The “finger crochet” method I describe below is something that came out of a lot of experimentation, but I’m guessing you fiber wizards could whip up something even better! If you’ve done a similar project, or have suggestions to make this DIY more clear, please feel free to tell us about it in the comments below.

When I finished re-weaving my t-shirt rug (updated photos at the bottom of that post) I figured out two important things.

  1. There is better way to cut a t-shirt into strips (fewer, longer strips.)
  2. Once you know how to cut t-shirts into long strips, no t-shirt is safe.

IMG_1957_roundtshirtrug
Which translates to: I had a lot of leftover strips of jersey, and wanted to use them up! I started braiding, tying knots, and eventually settled on a method that can best be described as the frumpy cousin of crochet.

PREP: Cutting one long strip

Knotting small strips of jersey (demonstrated in the woven rug post) is time-consuming, so the longer the strip the better. After digging around a bit I found this video that shows how to turn a loop into one long strip.

IMG_2100_roundtshirtrugI started by cutting the large loop of the shirt from the top, and sliced across from one side, stopping about an inch from the other edge.


Then I slipped the loop over my arms, and starting at the end of one cut I cut diagonally towards the end of the next cut on the other side of the fabric. Then the whole thing unwound in a continuous strip.

MAKING THE RUG


To begin I tied a slip-knot near the end of the string by making a loop, reaching through and grabbing the strip, pulling it though and gently pulling to tighten. (There’s a great demonstration of a slip knot at the beginning of this video.)

IMG_1975_roundtshirtrug
Then I reached through that loop, pinched the strip, and pulled it through to create my first chain stitch. (See steps 2 thru 4 on this Red Heart blog post). This whole project breaks down into pulling a new loop through an old loop.

I repeated this chain stitch about 5 times, then…


tucked the loose string end through the last chain stitch to loosely close the first set of chains into a circle.

IMG_2045_roundtshirtrug
To connect the next ring of chains I pulled the next strip (navy) through two existing loops– the one I just made (pictured here closest to my thumb), and the inside of an earlier chain that lined up with my new one (closer to my fingertip).

IMG_2047_roundtshirtrug
This way my newest loop connected my existing chain to the one inside of it. I then started a pattern of 3 chain stitches, 1 connecting stitch, 3 chain stitches, 1 connecting stitch, 3 chain stitches, 1 connecting stitch, 3 chain stitches, 1 connecting stitch, 3 chain stitches, 1 connecting stitch…

IMG_2070_roundtshirtrug
going around and around the circle.

IMG_2073_roundtshirtrug
When I ran out of strips, I pulled the end of my string through the last loop, and tucked it into the rug– because one day I will have more t-shirts to dismantle, and this rug will keep getting bigger!

IMG_2253_roundtshirtrug_1

TIPS

  • As you are working, make sure not to pull your loops too tight, or stretch your chain when you’re doing a connecting stitch. The looser you work the flatter the rug will sit.
  • Different shirts will make thicker or thinner strings based on the thickness of their fabric. I opted for a very irregular look with lots of inconsistencies in my strips (width ranging from 1″ – 2″) but if you want a more regular look, stick with shirts of a similar weight, and cut your strips about 1.25″ wide.
  • If it’s looking weird, pull out your loops and start over! Once you get the hang of this version of finger crochet you’ll fly through this project, so you will quickly make up the time redoing it. Practice has never been more fun.
  • If you can, work for longish stretches to keep your tension consistent. This is a great “while watching tv or daydreaming” activity.
  • As always, plan to make one more rug than you have cats.

IMG_2196_roundtshirtrug_1

TOOLBOX: Water Color Masking Fluid

IMG_7722
I love playing with watercolors, I’m going to admit that right now. I love the way the colors run together, the little blotches of pigment, and basically everything else about it. I’m not a watercolor expert, which means that whenever the paint does something unexpected I have the giddy feeling that I just discovered something amazing. (What did I tell you? I love the process.)

My philosophy teacher in high school used to amazing things with watercolor, and I would always try to sneak a look at his paintings before and after class. One day I noticed him using something to cover up portions of the paper while he was working– cut to 15 years later and I finally decide to buy myself a little bottle of masking fluid to play around with. (I bought Winsor & Newton Colorless Art Masking Fluid.)

IMG_7588
Still a little overwhelmed to jump in, I watched this introductory video, decided on a test project; and gathered my brushes, paints, and spirit of exploration.

IMG_7677
A note: the first time I used the fluid, I ruined my brush. It was a cheap brush, granted, but after that I sharpened up and coated the next brush in dish soap before dipping it in the masking fluid. I coated the whole thing in the dish soap, then squeezed the excess out. (This video shows you how.) Trust me. It’s better that way.

IMG_7610
I drew a basic outline of the words I wanted to mask out with pencil. After coating the brush in soap, and gently rolling the bottle of masking fluid to mix it up, I dipped my brush in and saturated it.

IMG_7611
Bit by bit, I covered the words with the masking fluid.

IMG_7612

All the lines are covered in the fluid now. I’ll be able to erase the pencil lines once everything is done.

IMG_7619
I let the masking fluid dry COMPLETELY before I began to paint with my watercolor. (The dry masking compound feels like rubber cement. You’ll know it’s dry when it is only slightly shiny, and your finger does not stick to it.) The watercolor will not stick to the mask, so you will be able to see what you’re working with.

IMG_7685
When I had finished my first layer of paint, I let it dry COMPLETELY, then added a little more masking to what would be the little abstract windows in the buildings.

IMG_7691
Then I let those dry COMPLETELY (do you see a theme here?) before I went in and darkened all the fields of color.

IMG_7703
When I was done working around my masked areas, and everything was dry, I lightly rubbed the masking agent off with the tips of my fingers. (This alone is worth the trouble. I love pulling glue off of things.)

IMG_7708
Once the mask was off, and I did a little erasing, I had crisp white lines to work with.

IMG_7712
The masked areas were pale enough to let me add a little light yellow watercolor. I love the way the white letters stand out.

Tips to remember

• Test out the water color paper you’re going to be using before you start your artwork. Some of the papers I tried stuck to the masking fluid terribly, and I had to tear the paper to get the dried mask off.
• Coat your brush in soap, or you will ruin a brush, and most likely the piece of paper you’re working on. The first brush started to pull the drying mask fluid back off the paper, and it totally ruined one of my projects.
• Let everything dry COMPLETELY before moving from fluid to paint, or paint to fluid. The fluid will cling to wet paper, or your wet paint and make a wet mess.
• Remember to have fun! Let that childish sense of wonder take over for an afternoon… and when you’re done experimenting, send us the outcome! April’s DIY Challenge is Watercolor, after all.

DIY: Valentine Pocket with Printable Template

IMG_6055
Like I mentioned before, Valentine’s Day gets me pretty sappy. Sappy enough that all I wanted to do the other day was make a tiny Valentine Pocket to hide secret messages in.

I know. I know.

Well, I did it anyway, and put together a template and tutorial so you can make pockets of your very own, to decorate with all those heart stamps you made.

IMG_5910

Supplies

• Scissors
• Glue or gluestick
• Pens, pencils, markers, stamps, and anything else you’d like to decorate with
• The template below, printed (preferably on cardstock but regular weight paper will work.)

valentinepocket
IMG_6004
It’s easier to decorate the pockets before you cut them out, so go crazy. I used all the heart stamps I made the day before, and every valentiney color. The more coverage you get on the pocket itself, the better they look (I think.)

IMG_6008When you’ve finished decorating, all you have to do is…

IMG_6025
Cut out the pocket template…

IMG_6029
fold along the dotted (hearted) lines, fold in & add glue to the striped flaps, and press the back of the pocket down.

IMG_6035

The back of the pocket, after the flaps have been glued in.

IMG_6017
Then you can write your secret message, and slip it into the Valentine Pocket

IMG_6022
and get started on the next dozen!

Bonus- The pockets are the perfect size for a business card, in case you want to do a slightly more professional version of the pocket. (I don’t know. Maybe?)
IMG_6102 IMG_6042
I’d love to see what you do with yours!

DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets

DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets #dayofthedead #diadelosmuertos #embroidery

We’ve officially entered our rainy season here in the Pacific Northwest. The grey and rainy weather has got me in the mood for crafting and watching movies. I’ve been making these little Felt Sugar Skull Sachets and they are so much fun! I can start and finish one in an evening and I love experimenting with different designs, colors and embroidery stitches.

What You Need

• Felt in various colors
• Embroidery floss in various colors
• Needle & scissors
Free printable template
• Markers or pencils

For The Sachet

• Cinnamon sticks (crushed or broken up in to small pieces)
• Clove
• Allspice
• Cedar shavings

Other Autumn Herbs To Try:
• Orange Peel
• Dried Ginger Root
• Dried Apple
• Rosemary

Instructions

Print out the free template and using the skull drawings, draw your sugar skull design. If you are a beginner at embroidery, I recommend keeping your designs rather simple. Experiment with using both felt and embroidery floss to create your design. You can look up sugar skulls on Pinterest for inspiration.

DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets #dayofthedead #diadelosmuertos #embroidery

Use the free template to cut out your felt pieces.

DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets #dayofthedead #diadelosmuertos #embroidery

Now it’s time to begin your embroidery. Choose a contrasting color floss and begin sewing the eyes onto the skull shape. I used a hand-applique blanket stitch.

DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets #dayofthedead #diadelosmuertos #embroidery

Next sew on the nose. Any simple stitch will work.

DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets #dayofthedead #diadelosmuertos #embroidery

To begin the mouth, first use a felt tip marker to draw a line as a guide. Then using black embroidery floss, begin sew the mouth using a backstitch.

DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets #dayofthedead #diadelosmuertos #embroidery
DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets #dayofthedead #diadelosmuertos #embroidery

Next it’s time to add your embellishments. If you’ve chosen to add any felt elements now is the time to appliqué them into place.

DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets #dayofthedead #diadelosmuertos #embroidery

Then using your template drawing, continue to embroider the sugar skull embellishments. You can look up different stitches on Youtube or Pinterest.

DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets #dayofthedead #diadelosmuertos #embroidery

Now that you’ve finished your embroidery, it’s time to sew the front and back of the sugar skull together using a blanket stitch. Leave a 2″ opening.

DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets #dayofthedead #diadelosmuertos #embroidery

Next create your sachet mix. I used cinnamon stick, clove, allspice and cedar.

DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets #dayofthedead #diadelosmuertos #embroidery

Fill your felt sugar skull with your spice mixture and then continue the blanket stitch to close.

DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets #dayofthedead #diadelosmuertos #embroidery

I just love how these turned out and can’t wait to gift them to friends and family.

DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets #dayofthedead #diadelosmuertos #embroidery

DIY: Crayon Candles

DIY: Crayon Candles #craft #crayola #recycled
My obsession with bright colors got me hooked when I saw this tutorial by Brit+Co. I already had a bunch of old crayons on hand from my previous DIY crayon post and I’ve been interested in making candles lately, so this was the perfect project!

Once you’ve gathered your supplies and setup a work space near your microwave, this project is fairly simple and would be a great craft to do with a friend. I loved blending my own colors and experimenting with different color combinations.

DIY: Crayon Candles #craft #crayola #recycled

Supplies Needed

• Old crayons
• Glass votives (I used small juice glasses)
• Wax
• Wicks
• Dixie cups (or any paper cup)
• Popsicle sticks (for stirring)

Additional Tools

• Microwave
• X-acto knife

The first step is to peel the paper off your crayons. You can either use an x-acto knife or soak the crayons in water for easy peeling.

Next, fill a dixie cup with wax and microwave for 1 minute. Give it a stir and microwave again in 30 second intervals until wax is completely melted. Pour a thin layer of wax into the bottom of each votive and place the candle wick in the center. Let harden.

DIY: Crayon Candles #craft #crayola #recycled

Using one crayon per color, fill a dixie cup with wax and top with a broken up crayon. Microwave for 2 minutes and then in 30 second intervals until completely liquified. Let cool for 30 seconds or so and pour colored wax into the votive. Let the first layer dry for 20-30 minutes.

DIY: Crayon Candles #craft #crayola #recycled

Repeat this process and continue to pour layers of colored wax into each votive, making sure to let them dry between each layer.

DIY: Crayon Candles #craft #crayola #recycled

And that’s it!

DIY: Crayon Candles #craft #crayola #recycled
DIY: Crayon Candles #craft #crayola #recycled

What other fun crafts have you made with old crayons? We’d love to hear about your projects…

UPDATE 9/14/14

I had some trouble burning my candles. After talking with a candle making friend, she recommended I use a larger (thicker) wick. Also, be careful not to burn out your microwave! I recommend only make a few candles at a time to prevent over-heating your microwave. Happy making!

DIY: Tie-Dye Tissue Paper

DIY: Tie-Dye Paper #craft #tiedye #tissue
Tie-dye paper was one of the first crazy-idea-craft-projects Alison and I ever did together. You can read about our mishaps and crafty shenanigans from that day here.

We learned a lot from that day back in 2011 and have been making tie-dye paper ever since. We love using it to make tissue paper flowers, to wrap gifts, and even to glue into pages of journals. This tutorial will walk you through how to successfully tie-dye tissue paper (because believe me it’s actually a little tricky).

Supplies Needed

• White tissue paper
• Liquid watercolors
• Plastic cups
• Paper towels

Step 1. Fold Your Paper

This is the basic folding technique for tie-dye paper. First you fold it accordion style, back and forth until you have one long rectangle.

DIY: Tie-Dye Paper #craft #tiedye #tissue
DIY: Tie-Dye Paper #craft #tiedye #tissue

Then fold the bottom right corner to the left edge to make a triangle. Continue turning and pressing until you have one large triangle.

DIY: Tie-Dye Paper #craft #tiedye #tissue
DIY: Tie-Dye Paper #craft #tiedye #tissue
DIY: Tie-Dye Paper #craft #tiedye #tissue

Repeat this folding process for as many sheets of tissue you’d like to tie-dye.

DIY: Tie-Dye Paper #craft #tiedye #tissue

Step 2: Dye Your Paper

First you want to prep your dyeing area. I like to use a large baking sheet lined with paper towels as a work surface. First pour the liquid watercolor into the plastic cups or bowls.

DIY: Tie-Dye Paper #craft #tiedye #tissue

Then begin dipping the corners of the folded triangle into the different colors. You’ll want to hold the paper in the dye for a few seconds to allow the watercolor to soak into the folded paper.

DIY: Tie-Dye Paper #craft #tiedye #tissue

I like to dip my paper into three different colors (one for each corner of the triangle). Once you’re done dying, place it on the paper towel and let dry completely.

DIY: Tie-Dye Paper #craft #tiedye #tissue

You may be like me, and not have the patience to wait until the paper is completely dry before unfolding, but if you try to unfold wet tissue paper it WILL tear. So keep calm and wait it out.

DIY: Tie-Dye Paper #craft #tiedye #tissue

Once your triangles are completely dry, carefully unfold the tissue. You can use a warm iron to flatten the paper completely and remove some of the creases from folding.

Some Tips

Tissue – I originally tried using tissue paper from the Dollar Tree and didn’t get the best results. The watercolor had trouble soaking into the tissue. So next I tried some tissue from my local craft store and had much better results. I guess some tissue paper is less absorbent? If you don’t get the results you like, simply try another brand.
Liquid watercolor – can be difficult to find. I found the Artist’s Loft brand bottles at Michael’s in the art supply section of the store. Alison also recommends using Blick Liquid Watercolors.
• For a fast dry, set your oven to it’s lowest setting and place your paper towel lined baking tray in the oven for approx. 10 minutes.

DIY: Crayons + Free Printable Coloring Book!

DIY Crayons + Free Printable Coloring Book #craft #kids #printable #bug

Making your own crayons is a popular craft and a great activity you can do with your kids. I used a mini cupcake mold to make our crayons, but you could also try using a fun shaped silicon mold as well. Get your kids involved and help them make their own party favors for their friends! Plus we’ve got a free printable coloring book (illustrated by me) for everyone to have fun coloring in.

DIY Crayons + Free Printable Coloring Book #craft #kids #printable #favor

DIY Crayons + Free Printable Coloring Book #craft #kids #printable #favor

DIY Crayon Favors

• Old, broken crayons
• Mini cupcake tray (or other oven-proof mold)

First you want to peel the paper off all the crayons. You can soak them in water to make them easier to peel.

Next, break them up into small pieces and place them into the mold. You’ll want to be careful not to fill them too full. You don’t want to overflow the pan.

DIY Crayons + Free Printable Coloring Book #craft #kids #printable #favor

Preheat oven to its lowest setting. I set mine for 170 degrees. Bake the crayons in oven for approx. 30 minutes, or until they are completely melted. Let cool completely (about 1 hour) and pop the crayons out of the mold. I used an x-acto knife to loosen any crayons that did not come out easily.

Package crayons in hand-stamped muslin drawstring gift bags and a cute custom favor tag from Evermine.com

DIY Crayons + Free Printable Coloring Book #craft #kids #printable #favor

Click here to download the free printable coloring book!

To assemble, print pages 2-3 back to back. Fold all pages in half and saddle stitch (staple) together to form a book.

DIY Crayons + Free Printable Coloring Book #craft #kids #printable #favor