DIY: Robot Valentine’s Day Cards with Tam Hess

DIY: Robot Valentine Cards with Tam Hess
Please welcome guest blogger Tam Hess! Today she is sharing a fun tutorial on how to make a robot valentine using one of her own digital stamps. You can read more about Tam and the cute things she makes in her Featured Maker interview.

Working with digital stamps is so much fun! I made this easy Robot Valentine card with a free digital stamp designed by me. There are tons of cute free and low cost digital stamps online. Downloading digital stamps and keeping them on your computer saves time and space. As soon as I discovered this idea I fell in love and started designing my own. I’m particularly biased and love this robot digital stamp… well, because I created him!

Step One: Gather your supplies

The first step for designing your robot valentine card is to gather your supplies. Find fun papers, ribbon, embossing folders, punches, pens, pencils and paints. Anything you would like to use for your card. I especially love watercolors so I will get all my watercolor supplies out for some fun.

Step Two: Download and print your digital stamp

Download the robot digital stamp for free from my website. Then print it out on either 72lbs watercolor paper for watercoloring or card stock paper for pencils and pens.

DIY: Robot Valentine Cards with Tam Hess

I like to size/format my digital stamps to be 3.5” x 2.5” and print them out four at a time. If you download Card Making Artists free digital stamps, I always include a digital stamp PDF sized/formatted just right for handmade cards.

Step Three: Color your robot

Use watercolors, pens, pencils or paints to color your robots any way you like. Have fun trying different color combinations.

Step Four: Cut out the image

Start cutting the robot image. I use the gray border line around the robot image as a guide for cutting out the digital stamp. You can use scissors, which I normally use but the cutting board works well too.

DIY: Robot Valentine Cards with Tam Hess

After getting all the robots painted and cut out, I start looking through my stash of papers and embellishments to find the ones that match the robots. Yes, I will gather some supplies before I start my project but usually I have to jump up a million times to find just the right colored paper or embellishments. Once I get all the robots matched to papers and card folders it’s time to decide on a design.

DIY: Robot Valentine Cards with Tam Hess

Step Five: Design your card

Finding the right design for your card can be tricky. I really get stumped on card designs. Usually I will find a “card sketch” online that I refer to. “Card sketches” are like templates to follow for card making. You can find “card sketches” on card challenge sites like Retro Sketches, which is my favorite card making challenge site. When you use a digital stamp like the Valentine Robot stamp, you can keep your design and embellishments to a minimum. If you need something smaller or don’t like the sentiment, I included in your download a PNG (Portable Network Graphic) version of your digital stamp. You can resize your PNG Valentine Robot to any size you like!

DIY: Robot Valentine Cards with Tam Hess

The robot digital stamp is large and is the focal point of the card so there’s no need to go overboard with the embellishing. However, I love the super busy over the top cards with all kinds of embellishments, the cards that look like they wouldn’t fit in an envelope? Awesome!

DIY: Robot Valentine Cards with Tam Hess

I need more card making practice to design one of those super embellished cards. Handmade cards are a fun and easy way to express yourself. People are always excited and impressed to receive something that you’ve made. The lazy part of me especially likes having a bunch of handmade cards ready for quick birthday and thank you greetings. If you’re super organized, keep a few gift cards on hand and then you’re really set! You can visit CardMakingArtists.com for more card making fun, ideas and free digital stamps.

DIY: Robot Valentine Cards with Tam Hess

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