RECIPE: Pansy Shortbread Cookies

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Do you believe in magic? Ever since I was a little girl, I’ve loved reading stories of the fairy folk living in an enchanted forest, playing with the animals, and sipping tea from rosebud tea cups. If I were ever invited to join them, I’d bring these Pansy Shortbread Cookies to share.

Inspired by the wonders of nature and the magic that can be found within it, I decided to make a batch of cookies fit for fairyland. This recipe is simple to make and so pretty! Make it your own (or please the fairies in your own backyard) by changing up the ingredients to suite your favorite flavors. I chose to make a lavender lemon shortbread cookie using lavender-infused sugar and dried lavender harvested from my garden. You could also try these Lemon Thyme Shortbread Cookies, these Earl Grey Shortbread Cookies or these Cardamom Orange Zest Shortbread Cookies.

flower-cookies-2Some Tips On Choosing Edible Flowers:

I used a few varieties of pansies that I had growing in my garden but you can experiment with other edible flowers too. Some things to keep in mind…

  • Choose flowers that will fit the shape of the cookie.
  • Only use edible flowers that you can identify correctly
  • Only use edible flowers that are grown organically (pesticide-free).
  • Edible flower suggestions: Chamomile, Johnny-Jump-Ups, Borage, Lavender, Marigolds, Pansies, Rose Petals, Violas, Violets.

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Pansy Shortbread Cookies
 
Author:
Recipe type: Dessert
Serves: 36 Cookies
Ingredients
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup lavender infused sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons dried lavender
  • Zest of one lemon
  • Fresh, organic pansies
  • 1 egg white, beaten
  • Fine sugar (for finishing)
Instructions
  1. Cream the butter with an electric mixer until fluffy. Stir in the flour, sugar and salt; beat on low speed for 1 minute. Crush the dried lavender using a mortar and pestle. Then add the vanilla, lavender and lemon zest to the mixer, beating until just incorporated.
  2. Let the dough chill in the refrigerator for approx. 1 hour. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease baking sheet and set aside.
  3. On a floured surface, roll out the dough to ¼" thickness. Cut out with round or scalloped cookie cutters and place 1" apart onto the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 14-18 minutes, until the cookies begin to turn light golden around the edges and on the bottom. Remove from oven and transfer to wire racks to cool.
  4. Once the cookies are all baked and cooled its time to decorate with flowers! Use a pastry brush to brush a cookie with egg white and place a pansy on top. Then brush the pansy all over with egg white and sprinkle with fine sugar.
  5. Repeat with remaining cookies and return them to the baking sheet. Bake in the oven for another 5 minutes, then transfer to the wire racks to cool.

 
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Serve these at your next tea party or package them up as favors at your next fairytale gathering! And don’t forget to leave a few out in your garden for the fairies to enjoy 🙂
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DIY: Season’s Greetings Printable Herb Packet Gift

Season's Greetings Printable Herb Packet Gift Idea
I recently created this fun holiday printable idea for Garden Therapy and thought I would share it here on A.I.M for you to enjoy! -Rachel

Quick and easy holiday gifts are essential for surviving the holiday season. This free printable “Season’s Greetings” Herb Packet is perfect for small gifts and can easily fit into the mail with your holiday greeting cards! Use herbs harvested from your own garden to create flavorful seasoning mixes paired with a simple and delicious recipe.

CLICK HERE to for the full tutorial and free printable download over at Garden Therapy!

Season's Greetings Printable Herb Packet Gift Idea

RECIPE: Turmeric Hot Toddy (for cold/flu relief)

RECIPE: Turmeric Hot Toddy
Since making up a batch of turmeric paste last week I’ve been adding it to my morning ritual of drinking hot lemon water. I usually add a dash of cayenne and ginger powder and now I’m adding a teaspoon of turmeric paste as well. In the midst of my current obsession with turmeric and its amazing health benefits, I’ve been collecting recipes via Pinterest. When I stumbled across this recipe for a Turmeric Hot Toddy I knew I had to try it.

I usually only crave a hot toddy when I’m sick with a cold since the drink is known to ease the aches and pains of the common cold. But since my morning ritual tea is so similar to a hot toddy (minus the booze), I decided to give it a try and enjoy a hot mug on a rainy Saturday afternoon.

RECIPE: Turmeric Hot Toddy

How does a Hot Toddy ease cold symptoms exactly?

• For hundreds of years brandy has been used as a traditional remedy for the common cold/flu. The natural warming properties of brandy, mixed with its relaxing quality that induces healthy sleep and the antibacterial nature of alcohol, together creates a much needed boost for the immune system. You can read more on the health benefits of brandy here.
• Lemon and honey can relieve a sore throat, help loosen congestion and prevent dehydration.
• Turmeric is a powerful anti-inflammatory, a natural blood purifier, and is antioxidant and antiseptic.

Note: Even though I do enjoy the cold/flu relief felt when sipping a hot toddy, it’s not the only remedy I turn to when I’m feeling sick. It’s also a good idea to get lots of rest and drink plenty of fluids. Don’t forget that alcohol actually dehydrates the body, so think of a hot toddy as a way to pamper yourself when you’re feeling sick and drink in moderation.

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Turmeric Hot Toddy
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Beverage
Serves: 1 serving
Ingredients
  • 1-2 oz brandy or bourbon
  • 1 tsp turmeric paste
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 1 lemon
  • Cinnamon stick, cloves, star anise (for garnish)
Instructions
  1. In a glass mug, juice ½ lemon and add turmeric paste and honey. Stir to combine. Fill half way with hot water and stir until turmeric/honey is melted. Add 1-2 ounces of brandy or bourbon and top off with more hot water.
  2. Garnish with a lemon wedge, cloves, cinnamon stick and a star anise. Drink hot!
  3. Note: you can substitute herbal tea for the turmeric paste

RECIPE: Turmeric Hot Toddy

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

As I continue my research and spend more time with the wonderful Indian/Asian spice, Turmeric, I love and learn more and more about it. Known in Sanskrit as the “Golden Goddess”, turmeric is often used in sacred Hindu ceremonies. Turmeric has been a staple in Indian food traditions for millennia and has at least 4,000 years of use in Ayurvedic, traditional Chinese, and Siddhic medicinal traditions. Ayurvedic practitioners believe that turmeric emanates the energy of the divine feminine and helps grant prosperity.

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

Health benefits of Turmeric

Turmeric comes from the root of the Curcuma Longa plant and is a member of the ginger family. It’s most known for it’s powerful anti-inflammatory properties, and is also a natural blood purifier, analgesic and antiseptic. The bioactive compound, Curcumin is what gives turmeric its bright yellow/orange color and is an effective topical antibacterial agent. It has stronger antioxidant properties than vitamin E, is anti-tumor, antibacterial and antimicrobial. It’s also known to assist in liver detox and has been used for centuries to promote healing of the gut, stomach and liver.

Note: Because it’s been found that turmeric is rapidly metabolized by the liver and intestines, its medicinal properties may not be as effective unless it is consumed with black pepper, which has been found to increase the absorption of curcumin by 2000%.

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

So, not only is turmeric a vibrant natural dye perfect for using this time of year, it has amazing health benefits too. How can you not love this spice!? Turmeric can be consumed dried, cooked, or raw, and has a slightly peppery, mildly bitter and earthy flavor. There are many ways to incorporate turmeric into your cooking and it can also be drank as a tea. A common method I found in my research is to make what’s called, Golden Milk. And to make it, you must first create a turmeric paste…

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

Turmeric Paste
 
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Author:
Ingredients
  • ½ cup filtered water
  • ¼ cup ground turmeric
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
Instructions
  1. Combine ingredients in a small saucepan. Heat over medium high heat, stirring constantly until it forms a thick paste. Transfer paste into a small glass jar and store in the refrigerator until ready to use.

 

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

Once you’ve made your turmeric paste, you can make yourself up a warm cup of Golden Milk anytime you want!

Golden Milk
 
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Author:
Serves: 1 cup
Ingredients
  • 1 cup milk (dairy or nondairy)
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric paste
  • 1 teaspoon coconut oil
  • Honey or maple syrup (to taste)
  • Cinnamon or nutmeg (to taste)
Instructions
  1. Combine the milk, turmeric paste and coconut oil in a saucepan and heat over medium heat until it just starts to boil. Pour into a mug and sweeten with honey and a sprinkle of cinnamon.

 

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment
Homemade mustard has been on my to-do list since last spring and I’m excited to finally make up a small batch. Since starting my herb garden this year, I’ve been keeping my eye out for new ways to harvest and use fresh herbs. This recipe from Wonky Wonderful made for a great starting point. I followed her basic guidelines and made some of my own alterations to suite my own tastes.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment

The first step is to soak your mustard seed over night. I combined 1/4 cup mustard seed, with a 1/4 cup filtered water and 1/4 cup four thieves vinegar (you can also use raw apple cider vinegar) in a small mason jar and set it in the refrigerator overnight.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment

The next morning, the mustard seed will have absorbed most of the liquid and be ready to prepare with the rest of the ingredients.

Pour the soaked mustard seed (and remaining liquid) into a food processor and add the following: 2 teaspoons lemon juice, 3 tablespoons honey (add more for a sweeter mustard flavor), 1/2 teaspoon turmeric, 1/4 teaspoon sea salt, and about 1 tablespoon fresh herbs. I also sprinkled in a few red pepper flakes.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

You can use any variety of herbs you like. I chose a few sprigs each of fresh thyme, oregano, parsley, rosemary and marjoram from my garden.

Once you’ve added all the ingredients, puree until you get a nice consistency. Transfer back into a clean mason jar and store in the refrigerator.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

This mustard will keep in the refrigerator for up to 4 weeks. I can’t wait to try it on my next ham sandwich!

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

Garden Herb Mustard
 
Author:
Recipe type: Condiment
Serves: About 1 cup
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup mustard seed
  • ¼ cup raw apple cider vinegar (I used four thieves vinegar)
  • ¼ cup filtered water
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon fresh herbs
Instructions
  1. Combine the mustard seed, vinegar, and water in a small jar and refrigerate overnight.
  2. Pour soaked mustard seed (and remaining liquid) into a food processor and add the remaining ingredients. Puree to desired consistency. Taste and add more honey or herbs if desired.
  3. Store in a clean mason jar. Refrigerate and use within 3-4 weeks.

 

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

I’ve recently taken up the study of herbalism and have begun to create my own Materia Medica in the form of an artist’s book. I plan to spend time with each herb, watching it grow in my garden and harvesting, experimenting with different uses, and even learning its history and folk lore. Lately I’ve been learning and loving sweet, gentle chamomile.

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

I have to admit, since beginning this project I’ve resisted moving on to a new herb. Chamomile is just so caring and nurturing and I’ve been in need of the comfort that chamomile brings. Enjoying a cup of chamomile tea before bed has become a new part of my nightly routine. The other night I decided to change things up a bit and make a chamomile latte by adding almond milk and chamomile infused honey. The result was sweet, creamy and extremely soothing.

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

Chamomile Latte
 
Author:
Recipe type: Drinks
Ingredients
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup milk (I used almond milk)
  • 2 tablespoons dried chamomile
  • 1 teaspoon honey
Instructions
  1. Combine water, milk and dried chamomile in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, then immediately turn down the heat and let simmer for 2 minutes. Strain mixture into a large mug and sweeten with honey.

The cool weather we’ve had this week has reminded me of the Chamomile Cupcakes I baked last summer. Wanting to try something new and use the Infused Sugar I made a while back inspired me to try out this recipe by Bird Is The Word PDX. This was my first time making scones and I think the flavors of both the chamomile and lavender come through quite nicely.

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

Chamomile Lavender Scones
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Dessert
Serves: About 8
Ingredients
  • 2 cups flour
  • ½ cup chamomile infused sugar
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon dried lavender
  • 1 tablespoon dried chamomile (stems removed and flowers crushed with mortar/pestle)
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • 6 tablespoons butter, cut into ½" cubes
  • ½ cup + 2 tablespoons milk or cream
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 2-3 tablespoons chamomile tea
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. In a large bowl mix together the dry ingredients including the lavender and chamomile. Cut the butter in with your fingers, working the mixture until it resembles a coarse sand.
  2. Add milk and mix with your hands until a dough forms. Roll out onto a floured surface to about 1" think. Use a pint glass to cut the scones out of the dough.
  3. Place onto a baking sheet lined with parchment. Bake for 18-20 minutes or until slightly golden.
  4. While the scones cool, brew up a cup of chamomile tea and add it one tablespoon at a time to the powdered sugar until a paste-like frosting forms. Drizzle it over the scones and enjoy!

These scones pair perfectly with a warm Chamomile Latte so whip up a batch and then enjoy the sweet, soothing flavor of chamomile.

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

RECIPE: Scrap Veggie Broth to Perfect Any Recipe


Maybe everyone knows to make their own veggie broth. I didn’t until a couple of years ago when I had a pile of veggie scraps and an aha moment. After a couple of quick searches, I decided to toss everything in the slow cooker and see what happened.

AMAZING happened. I ended up with a complex  unique broth that I was eager to cook with.

Since then I’ve saved almost all my veggie and fruit scraps in a bag in the freezer, and when it gets full it gets turned into what I lovingly call “trash soup”.

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RECIPE: Scrap Veggie Broth in a slowcooker
 
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This simple veggie broth will use up all your fruit and vegetable scraps, and make your next meal that much better.
Author:
Ingredients
  • 1 Tsp. Salt (to Taste)
  • A Variety of Raw Vegetable Scraps*
  • You can use skins, scraps, and leftover: Zucchini, Greens, Spinach, Okra, Apples, Tomatoes, Asparagus, Artichoke, Peas, Green Beans, Onions, Cabbage, Broccoli, Leeks, Garlic, Peppers, Carrot, Mushroom Stems, Herbs…. almost anything.
Instructions
  1. *Make sure to only use ingredients that you COULD eat fresh. Nothing dirty, slimy, moldy, etc. A little soft is fine. The key to the best broth is variety. Try not to use too much of anything with a strong flavor- but remember that this is a low pressure process. If it doesn't turn out, no big deal!
  2. Put all your scraps in a slow cooker and cover with water.
  3. Sprinkle salt over the mixture and mix it slightly with a spoon.
  4. Put crock pot on "low" and leave overnight– 10-20 hours– checking occasionally for taste and to stir gently.
  5. Ladle broth over a strainer to separate out vegetable scraps and broth.
  6. OPTIONAL: Simmer the broth on Med/High to condense the soup for freezing. Allow to cool completely before placing in a container or ziplock bag, and freeze until you're ready. (Make sure to label your container with tasting notes and a date.)

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For my broth today, I had a wide variety of veggies. From highest to lowest volume I used: zucchini, brussel sprout greens, tomatoes, onion, okra, mushroom stems, lemon rind, apple, bell pepper, and basil stems.


Make sure your scraps are clean and in relatively small pieces, then dump them into a medium crock pot,

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and cover them with water.

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Add about a teaspoon of salt (to taste) to the water.

Cover the crock pot, set it on “low” and let it do its thing through the evening and overnight. (It’s good to taste the broth, and stir occasionally to make sure everything is going well. If it starts to get bitter you can either stop the process, or give it some more time to possible cook itself out.)

After about 10-20 hours your concoction will look more like this:

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and will smell up your whole home in a delicious way. Use a ladle to spoon out the broth over a strainer…

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to separate out the broth and veggie chunks. Throw those depleted veggie scraps in the compost and look at what you’ve made!

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Beautiful, complex, broth– a perfect way to start almost any recipe.

Optional: If you want to save the broth for another day, you might find it useful to condense and freeze it. To do this, put your broth in a small pot and simmer on medium-high under a fan.

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Excess water will be released as steam, and after a while you’ll have a thicker, darker condensed broth. (This process can take some time, so I usually plan to do dishes, cleaning, or other kitchen activities while I wait.) Take the pan off the heat.  As your broth is cooling, do a final tasting and label your container (or ziplock bag) with tasting notes and a date.

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Then simply pour the cool broth into your container and freeze it for the perfect recipe. The more broths you make, the more you’ll notice differences in their flavor- making store bought broth seem ludicrous!

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We love adding the broths to everything we cook. It will kick up anything from soup, to sauces, to quinoa, and make you smile. (Promise.)

What I’ve Learned

•I’ve said it before, but variety is really key here. I usually leave a small collection of scraps in my freezer bag for the next broth, rather than using too much of one flavor.
•You may be an onion and garlic maniac, but don’t make a broth out of just those. Other veggies are necessary to cut the bitterness of over-extracted onions. Trust me.
•Good advice from a friend- “If the broth doesn’t taste good, throw it away. Don’t let it ruin a meal.” If your broth turns out weird or bitter, it’s not the end of the world. Try again next time!
•Try out a parmesan rind sometime, but otherwise avoid oils.
•Mellow fruits (like apples) make for a carmelly broth that would be lovely in a lot of dishes. Bolder fruits (cherries, berries, citrus) are best used in very small quantities.
•Some vegetables are stronger than others- broccoli, brussel sprouts, and cabbage can take over a broth completely. I don’t mind, but maybe you do?
•Yum.

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar
I can’t remember where exactly I first discovered Four Thieves vinegar, but I was intrigued by its use in history and it’s legendary story. Myth has it that a group of thieves during the European outbreak of the black plague set out to rob the dead and the sick in Marseille. When they were caught, they offered to exchange their secret recipe, which had allowed them to commit the robberies without catching the disease, in exchange for leniency. Another version says that the thieves had already been caught before the outbreak and their sentence had been to bury dead plague victims; to survive this punishment, they created the vinegar.

Recipes for this legendary concoction are as numerous as the stories. The following vinegar recipe hung in the Museum of Paris in 1937, and is said to have been an original copy of the recipe posted on the walls of Marseilles during an episode of the plague:

Take three pints of strong white wine vinegar, add a handful of each of wormwood, meadowsweet, wild marjoram and sage, fifty cloves, two ounces of campanula roots, two ounces of angelic, rosemary and horehound and three large measures of champhor. Place the mixture in a container for fifteen days, strain and express then bottle. Use by rubbing it on the hands, ears and temples from time to time when approaching a plague victim. [Source]

Plausible reasons for not contracting the Plague was that the herbal concoction contained natural flea repellents. Since the flea is the carrier for the Plague bacillus, Yersinia pestis. Wormwood has properties similar to cedar as an insect repellent, as all aromatics like sage, cloves, camphor, rosemary, campanula, etc. Meadowsweet, although known to contain salicyclic acid, it is mainly used to mask odors, like decomposing bodies.

Modern day versions of four thieves vinegar include various herbs that typically include sage, lavender, thyme, and rosemary, along with garlic. Additional herbs sometimes include rue, mint, and wormwood. It has become traditional to use four herbs in the recipe—one for each thief, though earlier recipes often have a dozen herbs or more. It is still sold in Provence. In Italy a mixture called “seven thieves vinegar” is sold as a smelling salt, though its ingredients appear to be the same as in four thieves mixtures.

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar
 
One of the main reasons I wanted to make this vinegar is because I have all of the following herbs growing fresh in my garden! If you have your own herb garden, this is a great way to use your harvest.
Author:
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lavender, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh mint, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh sage, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh thyme, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh marjoram, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh anise hyssop, chopped
  • 4 cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed
  • ½ teaspoon black peppercorns, crushed
  • 3 whole cloves, crushed
  • 16 oz raw apple cider vinegar
Instructions
  1. Combine chopped herbs, spices and garlic in a quart size mason jar and cover with the apple cider vinegar.
  2. Allow to infuse for 7-10 days in a sunny location then strain into a clean jar. Store at room temperature.

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

Uses

Natural Cleanser – The herbs used in this recipe posess strong antimicrobial effects and vinegar, in any case, makes an excellent natural cleanser. Fill a spray bottle with the vinegar and use it to clean and sterilize kitchen counters and bathrooms.
Astringent – Dilute some vinegar with water and use as a cleansing agent or astringent for the skin.
Insect Repellant – Fill a spray bottle with 1/4 cup of vinegar and top with filtered water. Spray on skin, clothes, etc. to deter pesky bugs.
Seasoning – Use as a seasoning for braised meats and vegetables or make a vinaigrette dressing for salads.
Immune Booster – Use like Fire Cider and take a teaspoonful several times a day to prevent cold/flu.

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party

In my last post, I mentioned that my 31st birthday is coming up and I am planning to celebrate by hosting a Bloody Mary themed party. I’ve been craving a good Bloody Mary ever since we got hit with our first heat wave in Portland. It felt too hot to cook or really eat much in 95+ degree heat and a cold Bloody Mary with all the fixings sounded like the perfect dinner on a hot summer night. (Un)lucky for me, the weather forecast for this coming weekend says the heat will be back on with another 97 degree high so I guess I’ll finally get exactly what I’ve been craving.

In preparation for the party I decided to infuse some vodkas. I chose two recipes, a special Bloody Mary Infusion (think garlic) and Bacon Habanero (think spicy).

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party

5.0 from 1 reviews
Bloody Mary Infused Vodka
 
Author:
Recipe type: Cocktail
Ingredients
  • • Garlic, crushed
  • • Tomato, sliced
  • • Olives
  • • Bell Pepper, halved
  • • Cilantro
  • • Dill
  • • Vodka
Instructions
  1. Fill a large mason jar with garlic, tomato, bell pepper, olives and herbs. I filled my jar about ⅓-1/2 of the way. Next add the vodka, filling the jar. Allow to infuse in the refrigerator for at least three days (I infused for a full week). Strain and discard the veggies, then pour infused vodka back into a clean jar or bottle.

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party

The Bloody Mary Infusion can be made up any way you want so feel free to try different combinations. Other ingredients to consider adding are: celery, cucumber, jalapeño, peppercorns. Now on to the bacon….

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party

5.0 from 1 reviews
Bacon Habanero Infused Vodka
 
Author:
Recipe type: Cocktail
Ingredients
  • 6 slices pepper bacon, cooked
  • 3 habanero peppers, halved and seeded
  • 2 serrano peppers, halved and seeded
  • Vodka
Instructions
  1. Place bacon and peppers in a large mason jar and cover with vodka, filling the jar. Let infuse in the refrigerator for up to one week. Give it a taste test after 3-4 days. The longer it infuses the spicier it will become.

RECIPE: Two Bloody Mary Vodka Infusions #cocktail #party

RECIPE: Candied Jalapeños

RECIPE: Candied Jalapeños by Adventures In Making

My 31st birthday is coming up and I’m planning to celebrate with a Bloody Mary themed party. To get ready I decided to make some creative garnishes including these candied jalapeños. I first discovered these sweet and spicy gems years ago when my friend Lindsay gifted me a jar. I can’t wait to try them on my fully loaded garnish skewer floating atop a spicy bloody mary cocktail!

RECIPE: Candied Jalapeños by Adventures In Making

Candied Jalapeños
 
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This recipe makes four 8 oz canning jars.
Author:
Recipe type: Garnish
Ingredients
  • 1½ lbs jalapeños
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 3 cups white sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon turmeric
  • ¼ teaspoon celery seed
  • 1½ teaspoons garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
Instructions
  1. Cut off the stems of the jalapeños and slice into ⅛-1/4 inch rounds. Set aside.
  2. Combine cider vinegar, sugar, turmeric, celery seed, garlic powder and cayenne pepper in a medium pot and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Add the jalapeños and simmer for exactly 4 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the peppers in to sterile canning jars. Turn up the heat on the pot and bring the syrup to a rolling boil. Boil hard for 6 minutes.
  3. Use a ladle to pour the syrup over the the jars covering the jalapeño slices. Insert a chopstick or butter knife in to the jars to release any air bubbles. Wipe the rim of the jars clean with a damp towel and secure lids.
  4. Place jars in refrigerator to mellow for 2-3 weeks (you can also can your jars using a hot water bath method).

RECIPE: Candied Jalapeños by Adventures In Making

I plan to eat these candied jalapeños with everything! They’d be perfect added to a charcuterie board, in a grilled cheese sandwich, on a pizza (with pepperoni and pineapple), or even on nachos instead of pickled jalapeños.

RECIPE: Candied Jalapeños by Adventures In Making