DIY: No Sew Woven T-Shirt Rag Rug

A couple of months ago I tore up the carpet in my office and replaced it with a wood-ish surface. It’s been great through these warm months, but I want something to stand on when the cold sneaks in. Couple that need with a stack of t-shirts left over from the quilt project, and you have my newest best friend, the t-shirt rag rug.

I built a 30″x30″ make-shift loom out of a piece of plywood and scrap wood, but if you search online you can find frames built from pretty much anything. (A Beautiful Mess used cotton scraps and a big piece of cardboard. Also, Pinterest)

I put nails along each end, 1 inch apart. Good hammer practice for a hammer novice.

With the loom assembled, I moved to materials.



The rug was built with 1.5″ loops for the warp (base strips) of my rug, and 1.75″ strips woven through.

I used a large straight rotary blade and a metal ruler to cut three navy shirts into the 1.5″ loops, then cut the rest of the shirts into 1.75″ strips. (This is a very forgiving fabric, so estimation is ok!)

I hooked the navy warp pieces on each side of the loom using the natural loop and stretch of the t-shirt.

I prepared to weave by attaching the first strip to the first warp loop. I cut a slit in one end of the strip, fed the other end around the first warp piece and back through the slit. Then I pulled it tightly and began to weave.

Not a normal knot.

I connected a lot of strips to finish this rug using the method shown below. It’s quick and tidy, and ensured you don’t have a lot of extra bulk at your connection points.


  1. Cut a small slit in the ends of each strip.
  2. Feed the new strip into the hole at the end of the other.
  3. Take the other end of the new strip and feed it through the slit on the same strip.
  4. Pull on the new end to tighten the knot. Smooth or trim extra material if needed.

(The video below shows how I knotted at the end of a strip.)


Now Weave!

Starting at that first warp piece, I wove in and out of each loop to the end of the loom. At the end I wrapped either over or under the last piece to start back down the loom. The second strand went over the strands that the first went under, and vice versa.

From there it was basically rinse and repeat. I wove back and forth, connecting strips and changing colors.

When possible I fed the strip through the warp flat, then pulled it down with my fingers to bunch it up.

The pattern and color combination were very important to me, and I got more and more excited as I worked on it. When I put the final strip in, I tied it off using a normal knot on the last piece of navy.

Finishing it off

Here’s where I admit this rug is really just a gigantic pot holder, and I finished it off the same way. I pulled the first warp loop free and fed the second through it, then fed the third through that one, and so on down the line. (Video Below)

Once I was down to the last two loops, I changed tactics. I cut the loop of the last piece, fed one strip through the second to last loop and tied it off.

I did the same thing on the other end and suddenly had a rug in front of me.


After basking in the last moments of sunshine, I rolled up the rug and brought it inside.

Where it was immediately claimed by another friend…


Looks like I’ll have to weave another rug for myself.

Next Time

  • The next rug will be bigger. Once I took this one off the loom it shrunk down a bit, and I love it too much for it to be small.
  • I won’t pull the woven strands as tightly, which will hopefully help with the shrinking.
  • Maybe I’ll try non-stretch cotton scraps?
  • I will plan to move the loom frame around a lot, and possibly rig up some way of leaning it upright while I’m weaving. Working flat gave me a back-ache.
  • I will take it in little batches, weaving in front of the tv or in public. If I weave in public I will look very serious about turning scraps into a comfy rug.

A sign of a successful project is the ability to look forward to the next one.

UPDATE: I enjoyed this project so much that I decided to remake this rug- BIGGER! I built a much larger loom using scrap wood and screws, then followed the same process to build this monstrosity. It sits cozily by my work table now, warms my feet, and makes me happy.


RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment
Homemade mustard has been on my to-do list since last spring and I’m excited to finally make up a small batch. Since starting my herb garden this year, I’ve been keeping my eye out for new ways to harvest and use fresh herbs. This recipe from Wonky Wonderful made for a great starting point. I followed her basic guidelines and made some of my own alterations to suite my own tastes.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment

The first step is to soak your mustard seed over night. I combined 1/4 cup mustard seed, with a 1/4 cup filtered water and 1/4 cup four thieves vinegar (you can also use raw apple cider vinegar) in a small mason jar and set it in the refrigerator overnight.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment

The next morning, the mustard seed will have absorbed most of the liquid and be ready to prepare with the rest of the ingredients.

Pour the soaked mustard seed (and remaining liquid) into a food processor and add the following: 2 teaspoons lemon juice, 3 tablespoons honey (add more for a sweeter mustard flavor), 1/2 teaspoon turmeric, 1/4 teaspoon sea salt, and about 1 tablespoon fresh herbs. I also sprinkled in a few red pepper flakes.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

You can use any variety of herbs you like. I chose a few sprigs each of fresh thyme, oregano, parsley, rosemary and marjoram from my garden.

Once you’ve added all the ingredients, puree until you get a nice consistency. Transfer back into a clean mason jar and store in the refrigerator.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

This mustard will keep in the refrigerator for up to 4 weeks. I can’t wait to try it on my next ham sandwich!

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

Garden Herb Mustard
Recipe type: Condiment
Serves: About 1 cup
  • ¼ cup mustard seed
  • ¼ cup raw apple cider vinegar (I used four thieves vinegar)
  • ¼ cup filtered water
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon fresh herbs
  1. Combine the mustard seed, vinegar, and water in a small jar and refrigerate overnight.
  2. Pour soaked mustard seed (and remaining liquid) into a food processor and add the remaining ingredients. Puree to desired consistency. Taste and add more honey or herbs if desired.
  3. Store in a clean mason jar. Refrigerate and use within 3-4 weeks.


RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

DIY: Build a Box and Lid

I love putting my creative instincts to good use in a 3d world, and that means I get a kick out of building boxes. There’s something magical about turning a little chipboard or cardboard and a little tape into a functional container, and it seems like I have plenty of opportunities to do just that.

The basics of building a box with a lid (which I call a hatbox) are very basic indeed. I drew up a little sample sheet with the very simplest version. Use cardboard or chipboard, scissors or a craft knife, and your favorite tape.

My challenge today was building a gift box for a set of wine glasses. (Recognize the etching process?)

I measured the length, depth, and height of the set, and got my favorite materials out.IMG_0916_buildabox


  • Chipboard Pieces
  • Gummed Paper Tape – I like working with this kind of tape when I’m using chipboard or cardboard. It starts out un-tacky, and when you wet it with a sponge it is like you poured a whole bunch of glue on it. It can be kind of messy, but you can shift it around until it dries, making it very forgiving.
  • Craft Knife
  • Scissors
  • Ruler

First I cut the 5 pieces for the bottom of the box, and pieces of tape for each seam.

Since I knew some of the tape would show on the final box, I made sure to cut an angle on any piece of tape that overlapped another piece- especially on corners.

To place the tape correctly on the board, I first laid the board out perfectly on my mat. I left a board’s width between each piece to allow for them to fold.

I used a wet rag moisten each piece where I needed it, then attached the tape pieces to my boards.


I’ve outlined my tape pieces here. The first pieces I placed were the a’s, then I moved on to b, then c.

I flipped the whole thing over, and started folding up and taping the sides (applying more water to keep the tape sticky and smoothing out any bubbles.)


With the bottom portion of the box completed, I measured the outside of the completed box and added about 1/8 of an inch to allow the lid to close easily. I chose 5″ at the height of the lid, and built another box like the first, using those dimensions.

I’m a big fan of a simple kraft colored box, but since this was a gift, I wanted to add a little pizazz. I printed a design on card stock, and cut it down to fit each side of the box lid. I used spray mount to adhere it to the box.

Then added a little ribbon, a card…
< a href=””>IMG_0993_buildabox
and a divider inside to kept the glasses from clanking.

I’m super happy with the way this box turned out– a perfect fit for gifting and storing the glasses.

I hope you can build off the simple instruction sheet to create the perfect home for your treasures, and of course some treasures for your home.

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

I’ve recently taken up the study of herbalism and have begun to create my own Materia Medica in the form of an artist’s book. I plan to spend time with each herb, watching it grow in my garden and harvesting, experimenting with different uses, and even learning its history and folk lore. Lately I’ve been learning and loving sweet, gentle chamomile.

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

I have to admit, since beginning this project I’ve resisted moving on to a new herb. Chamomile is just so caring and nurturing and I’ve been in need of the comfort that chamomile brings. Enjoying a cup of chamomile tea before bed has become a new part of my nightly routine. The other night I decided to change things up a bit and make a chamomile latte by adding almond milk and chamomile infused honey. The result was sweet, creamy and extremely soothing.

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

Chamomile Latte
Recipe type: Drinks
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup milk (I used almond milk)
  • 2 tablespoons dried chamomile
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  1. Combine water, milk and dried chamomile in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, then immediately turn down the heat and let simmer for 2 minutes. Strain mixture into a large mug and sweeten with honey.

The cool weather we’ve had this week has reminded me of the Chamomile Cupcakes I baked last summer. Wanting to try something new and use the Infused Sugar I made a while back inspired me to try out this recipe by Bird Is The Word PDX. This was my first time making scones and I think the flavors of both the chamomile and lavender come through quite nicely.

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

Chamomile Lavender Scones
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
Recipe type: Dessert
Serves: About 8
  • 2 cups flour
  • ½ cup chamomile infused sugar
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon dried lavender
  • 1 tablespoon dried chamomile (stems removed and flowers crushed with mortar/pestle)
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • 6 tablespoons butter, cut into ½" cubes
  • ½ cup + 2 tablespoons milk or cream
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 2-3 tablespoons chamomile tea
  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. In a large bowl mix together the dry ingredients including the lavender and chamomile. Cut the butter in with your fingers, working the mixture until it resembles a coarse sand.
  2. Add milk and mix with your hands until a dough forms. Roll out onto a floured surface to about 1" think. Use a pint glass to cut the scones out of the dough.
  3. Place onto a baking sheet lined with parchment. Bake for 18-20 minutes or until slightly golden.
  4. While the scones cool, brew up a cup of chamomile tea and add it one tablespoon at a time to the powdered sugar until a paste-like frosting forms. Drizzle it over the scones and enjoy!

These scones pair perfectly with a warm Chamomile Latte so whip up a batch and then enjoy the sweet, soothing flavor of chamomile.

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

DIY: Marble Paper with Oil Paints

Whenever Rachel and I get together there is always a lot of making. We hang out, paint, draw, and then we party (ie: DIY TIMES). In anticipation for this visit, we made lists of possible crafts, and “Paper Marbling” appeared on both lists. Done!

We’d seem several methods, but we had almost all the supplies to marble with oil paints so we decided to try that out first. It was a long, fun day; full of “oooooh” and “aaaaahhh,” sunshine, and turpentine fumes. We wanted to share our method and tips with you, so that you can make your own marble marvel.


Basic Supplies

  • Oil Paint Colors – cheap oil paints should work just fine, we used the M. Graham paints we had on hand.
  • Turpentine – Easily found at a hardware store.
  • Big plastic bin to float the paint in
  • Small containers to mix paint colors and turpentine
  • Cardstock (We loved the colored card stock best!)
  • Disposable bamboo skewers or spoons for stirring
  • Nitrile Gloves


Step 1: Prep

Before we got started we made a comb by taping toothpicks into a small strip of card stock. The comb was handy for pulling through the colors, and encouraging more “swirly bits.”

We set up our marbling table outside, which I recommend highly. You want to use a table or cover that it’s okay to get paint on. This is a messy craft, to be sure. We set out a tarp for drying our finished papers, put on our gloves and starting mixing things up.

We filled two plastic bins with about an inch or water and set them aside. Then we put out several colors of oil paints in our mixing containers.

It was a little trick to get the right mix of turpentine and paint, initially. We discovered that the ideal texture was somewhere around the thickness of whole milk.

marbledpaper_IMG_0740We added turpentine to the paint containers in small pours, and mixed it thoroughly with a bamboo skewer. If we needed to add more turpentine we did it as soon as we had the paint mixed to a consistent texture.


Step 2: Pouring the Paint

Then we just poured the paints on top of the water! Simple. Sometimes we did little drops, sometimes we just chunked it all in.

Our first batch of color was always full of the same color family, so that as the colors mixed in the water we didn’t end up with a bunch of brown paper. (Towards the end we got a little more daring, and had great results adding in complementary colors to the batches.)


We got a lot of mileage out of our toothpick combs, pulling them through the paint to swirl the colors together.


Step 3: Dipping the Papers

Once we were happy with a design, we laid the card stock quickly on top of the swirled colors, and removed it as delicately as we could. (Rachel had a great dunking method that involved bending the card stock down the middle– hamburger style– then rolling down from the middle to the outside edges before lifting from the water.)

Tada! It was amazing how unpredictable the results were. What you saw on the water might not be at all what showed up on the paper. We loved the look we got towards the end, when there was less paint and it all seemed to be thinner.

We did two different color stories, one was reds and golds and one was blues and greens. The reds tended to get a little “gory” at times, but looked beautiful on colored papers.


Step 4: Drying and Future Projects with Marbly Goodness

We laid the paged out for a few hours, while we cleaned all the paint up. When we were ready to go inside we stacked the sheets and set them aside to dry. It took a good 5 days for the oil to be dry to the touch, but now they are, and I have all kinds of ideas about what to do with my collection.

Maybe I’ll revisit an old DIY, what do you think?

The possibilities are endless. I’m okay with that.


Things We Learned

  • Working outside is key. The Turpentine is kinda smelly, and even with a light breeze we felt like we were standing in the fumes. Working outside also made cleanup a lot easier, with a big trash can and a hose available. Make sure to dispose of turpentine properly!
  • Initially we tried thinning the oil paint with walnut oil, but it did not allow the paint to spread out across the water. We had to drop everything and head to the store for turpentine to make the project come together. I have seen a couple of recommendations online for turpentine alternatives, but we didn’t try any (after the oil fiasco.)
  • If your paint drops to the bottom instead of floating, add a little more turpentine.
  • Sometimes less paint is better. I loved the last sheets we printed from each batch.
  • Opaque paint on black paper is tres cool.
  • Each sheet is cooler than the last, which means you won’t ever want to stop. Ever.

RECIPE: Scrap Veggie Broth to Perfect Any Recipe

Maybe everyone knows to make their own veggie broth. I didn’t until a couple of years ago when I had a pile of veggie scraps and an aha moment. After a couple of quick searches, I decided to toss everything in the slow cooker and see what happened.

AMAZING happened. I ended up with a complex  unique broth that I was eager to cook with.

Since then I’ve saved almost all my veggie and fruit scraps in a bag in the freezer, and when it gets full it gets turned into what I lovingly call “trash soup”.


RECIPE: Scrap Veggie Broth in a slowcooker
Cook time
Total time
This simple veggie broth will use up all your fruit and vegetable scraps, and make your next meal that much better.
  • 1 Tsp. Salt (to Taste)
  • A Variety of Raw Vegetable Scraps*
  • You can use skins, scraps, and leftover: Zucchini, Greens, Spinach, Okra, Apples, Tomatoes, Asparagus, Artichoke, Peas, Green Beans, Onions, Cabbage, Broccoli, Leeks, Garlic, Peppers, Carrot, Mushroom Stems, Herbs…. almost anything.
  1. *Make sure to only use ingredients that you COULD eat fresh. Nothing dirty, slimy, moldy, etc. A little soft is fine. The key to the best broth is variety. Try not to use too much of anything with a strong flavor- but remember that this is a low pressure process. If it doesn't turn out, no big deal!
  2. Put all your scraps in a slow cooker and cover with water.
  3. Sprinkle salt over the mixture and mix it slightly with a spoon.
  4. Put crock pot on "low" and leave overnight– 10-20 hours– checking occasionally for taste and to stir gently.
  5. Ladle broth over a strainer to separate out vegetable scraps and broth.
  6. OPTIONAL: Simmer the broth on Med/High to condense the soup for freezing. Allow to cool completely before placing in a container or ziplock bag, and freeze until you're ready. (Make sure to label your container with tasting notes and a date.)


For my broth today, I had a wide variety of veggies. From highest to lowest volume I used: zucchini, brussel sprout greens, tomatoes, onion, okra, mushroom stems, lemon rind, apple, bell pepper, and basil stems.

Make sure your scraps are clean and in relatively small pieces, then dump them into a medium crock pot,

and cover them with water.

Add about a teaspoon of salt (to taste) to the water.

Cover the crock pot, set it on “low” and let it do its thing through the evening and overnight. (It’s good to taste the broth, and stir occasionally to make sure everything is going well. If it starts to get bitter you can either stop the process, or give it some more time to possible cook itself out.)

After about 10-20 hours your concoction will look more like this:

and will smell up your whole home in a delicious way. Use a ladle to spoon out the broth over a strainer…

to separate out the broth and veggie chunks. Throw those depleted veggie scraps in the compost and look at what you’ve made!

Beautiful, complex, broth– a perfect way to start almost any recipe.

Optional: If you want to save the broth for another day, you might find it useful to condense and freeze it. To do this, put your broth in a small pot and simmer on medium-high under a fan.

Excess water will be released as steam, and after a while you’ll have a thicker, darker condensed broth. (This process can take some time, so I usually plan to do dishes, cleaning, or other kitchen activities while I wait.) Take the pan off the heat.  As your broth is cooling, do a final tasting and label your container (or ziplock bag) with tasting notes and a date.

Then simply pour the cool broth into your container and freeze it for the perfect recipe. The more broths you make, the more you’ll notice differences in their flavor- making store bought broth seem ludicrous!

We love adding the broths to everything we cook. It will kick up anything from soup, to sauces, to quinoa, and make you smile. (Promise.)

What I’ve Learned

•I’ve said it before, but variety is really key here. I usually leave a small collection of scraps in my freezer bag for the next broth, rather than using too much of one flavor.
•You may be an onion and garlic maniac, but don’t make a broth out of just those. Other veggies are necessary to cut the bitterness of over-extracted onions. Trust me.
•Good advice from a friend- “If the broth doesn’t taste good, throw it away. Don’t let it ruin a meal.” If your broth turns out weird or bitter, it’s not the end of the world. Try again next time!
•Try out a parmesan rind sometime, but otherwise avoid oils.
•Mellow fruits (like apples) make for a carmelly broth that would be lovely in a lot of dishes. Bolder fruits (cherries, berries, citrus) are best used in very small quantities.
•Some vegetables are stronger than others- broccoli, brussel sprouts, and cabbage can take over a broth completely. I don’t mind, but maybe you do?

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar
I can’t remember where exactly I first discovered Four Thieves vinegar, but I was intrigued by its use in history and it’s legendary story. Myth has it that a group of thieves during the European outbreak of the black plague set out to rob the dead and the sick in Marseille. When they were caught, they offered to exchange their secret recipe, which had allowed them to commit the robberies without catching the disease, in exchange for leniency. Another version says that the thieves had already been caught before the outbreak and their sentence had been to bury dead plague victims; to survive this punishment, they created the vinegar.

Recipes for this legendary concoction are as numerous as the stories. The following vinegar recipe hung in the Museum of Paris in 1937, and is said to have been an original copy of the recipe posted on the walls of Marseilles during an episode of the plague:

Take three pints of strong white wine vinegar, add a handful of each of wormwood, meadowsweet, wild marjoram and sage, fifty cloves, two ounces of campanula roots, two ounces of angelic, rosemary and horehound and three large measures of champhor. Place the mixture in a container for fifteen days, strain and express then bottle. Use by rubbing it on the hands, ears and temples from time to time when approaching a plague victim. [Source]

Plausible reasons for not contracting the Plague was that the herbal concoction contained natural flea repellents. Since the flea is the carrier for the Plague bacillus, Yersinia pestis. Wormwood has properties similar to cedar as an insect repellent, as all aromatics like sage, cloves, camphor, rosemary, campanula, etc. Meadowsweet, although known to contain salicyclic acid, it is mainly used to mask odors, like decomposing bodies.

Modern day versions of four thieves vinegar include various herbs that typically include sage, lavender, thyme, and rosemary, along with garlic. Additional herbs sometimes include rue, mint, and wormwood. It has become traditional to use four herbs in the recipe—one for each thief, though earlier recipes often have a dozen herbs or more. It is still sold in Provence. In Italy a mixture called “seven thieves vinegar” is sold as a smelling salt, though its ingredients appear to be the same as in four thieves mixtures.

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar
One of the main reasons I wanted to make this vinegar is because I have all of the following herbs growing fresh in my garden! If you have your own herb garden, this is a great way to use your harvest.
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lavender, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh mint, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh sage, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh thyme, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh marjoram, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh anise hyssop, chopped
  • 4 cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed
  • ½ teaspoon black peppercorns, crushed
  • 3 whole cloves, crushed
  • 16 oz raw apple cider vinegar
  1. Combine chopped herbs, spices and garlic in a quart size mason jar and cover with the apple cider vinegar.
  2. Allow to infuse for 7-10 days in a sunny location then strain into a clean jar. Store at room temperature.

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar


Natural Cleanser – The herbs used in this recipe posess strong antimicrobial effects and vinegar, in any case, makes an excellent natural cleanser. Fill a spray bottle with the vinegar and use it to clean and sterilize kitchen counters and bathrooms.
Astringent – Dilute some vinegar with water and use as a cleansing agent or astringent for the skin.
Insect Repellant – Fill a spray bottle with 1/4 cup of vinegar and top with filtered water. Spray on skin, clothes, etc. to deter pesky bugs.
Seasoning – Use as a seasoning for braised meats and vegetables or make a vinaigrette dressing for salads.
Immune Booster – Use like Fire Cider and take a teaspoonful several times a day to prevent cold/flu.

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

DIY: Culinary Herb Wreath

DIY: Culinary Herb Wreath

Herb gardening has become one of my favorite hobbies and this year I’m growing over 25 different types of herbs! There’s nothing better than a backyard garden full of fragrant edible plants. Now that it’s harvest season I’ve been researching ways to use them. I mainly use fresh herbs in cooking. Last year I made up a batch of yummy oregano pesto. I plan to make my own herbal vinegar and infused olive oils this year, but first I wanted to try something completely new- I made a gorgeous culinary herb wreath!

Not only was it fun choosing and harvesting the herbs I chose to use in my wreath, I also love that once the wreath has dried it becomes both decorative and functional. Find a spot in your kitchen (near the stove) to hang an herb wreath and all you have to do is snip off a few sprigs here and there to add to your cooking!

DIY: Culinary Herb Wreath

Read the Tutorial

You can find the full tutorial and make your own herb wreath by visiting my guest post over at Garden Therapy!

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden
Crystals and succulents have become some of my latest obsessions. Both are naturally beautiful and when put together make for a breathtaking combination. This has sparked my latest project- making my own mini crystal + succulent garden. I decided to start small with this project and hope to add to it and create larger arrangements as I collect more crystals and succulents. I recommend that you trust your gut with this project and simply follow your intuition when selecting and placing your succulents and crystals.

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden

Supplies Needed

• Succulent plants
• Crystals
• Planter
• Potting Soil

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden

First select your succulents and begin visualizing an arrangement within your planter. When you are ready, fill your planter about half way with potting soil and begin placing each succulent into the pot, filling in with more soil where necessary.

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden

Next, gather your crystals and begin placing them around your succulents. Remember to let your intuition be your guide and arrange your crystals in a way that feels meaningful to you.

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden
DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden

Once you’ve finished, find a sunny spot in your home for your mini crystal succulent garden to glisten and grow.

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden
DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden

DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter

DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor

I’ve recently gone through some major life changes, one of them being a complete overhaul and reorganization of my home. I had piles and piles of ‘stuff’ accumulated over the years that was literally taking over my space and my life. Making room for a new roommate was the perfect motivation for me to sort through and get rid of stuff and it feels so good to say goodbye to ‘the pile’ and start fresh.

Now that my life feels back in order, I can make time for some new decor ideas for my home. The first thing I wanted to do fill my new bedroom with hanging plants in the window. I spied a lovely Boston Fern at the grocery store and brought it home on a whim. Macrame is one of my favorite craft activities, since I already have the supplies on hand and a hanging planter is a fairly simple project to take on. I decided to use precut strips of jersey (t-shirt) material that I had in my stash for this project, but you can also recycle an old t-shirt by cutting it up into strips.

DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor

Supplies Needed

• Jersey (t-shirt) fabric, cut into strips
• Wooden beads
• Scissors
• Ruler or measuring tape
• House plant
• Hook (to hang the plant from)

Cut your t-shirt material into 1.5″ strips (you’ll need 8-12 strips total), then stretch each strip into round cords (if you pull on both ends and stretch the fabric strip it will roll itself into a cord naturally).

DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor

Take 8 strips and tie them together into one big knot as shown below. I chose to use two different colors of blue jersey fabric.

DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor

Group your cords into 4 sets of 2 and tie a knot in each set. To determine where I should tie the first knots, I first measured the radius of the bottom of my plant pot, then divided that number in half (my pot radius was about 6″ so I tied my first knots 3 inches below the first big knot).

DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor

Next separate your sets again into twos as shown in the photo below and tie knots again, approx. 3″ below the first set.

DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor
DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor

Repeat the last step to make a third row of knots. At this point you can stretch your macrame around your plant pot and adjust any knots if necessary. To finish, simply gather all your cords together and tie into one big knot at the top to finish.

DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor

But I tried my own variation…

You may have noticed that the cords look too short in the photo above to complete the hanger. Inspired by this image, I decided to change cord colors to finish the top of the hanger. To do this, I loosened the last row of knots and inserted a purple cord though the knot, then tightening securely.

DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor
DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor

Use scissors to trim the extra blue cord to 2-3″ long.

DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor

Next I added beads to the purple cords, using an awl (bookbinding tool) to help feed the cords through the bead holes. I also added wooden beads to the bottom of the big knot for some extra flair.

DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor

Finally, I stretched my completed macrame hanger around the plant pot, pulled the purple cords up and tied a knot at the top. To hang, install a screw-in hook into your ceiling.

DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor
DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor