RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

As I continue my research and spend more time with the wonderful Indian/Asian spice, Turmeric, I love and learn more and more about it. Known in Sanskrit as the “Golden Goddess”, turmeric is often used in sacred Hindu ceremonies. Turmeric has been a staple in Indian food traditions for millennia and has at least 4,000 years of use in Ayurvedic, traditional Chinese, and Siddhic medicinal traditions. Ayurvedic practitioners believe that turmeric emanates the energy of the divine feminine and helps grant prosperity.

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

Health benefits of Turmeric

Turmeric comes from the root of the Curcuma Longa plant and is a member of the ginger family. It’s most known for it’s powerful anti-inflammatory properties, and is also a natural blood purifier, analgesic and antiseptic. The bioactive compound, Curcumin is what gives turmeric its bright yellow/orange color and is an effective topical antibacterial agent. It has stronger antioxidant properties than vitamin E, is anti-tumor, antibacterial and antimicrobial. It’s also known to assist in liver detox and has been used for centuries to promote healing of the gut, stomach and liver.

Note: Because it’s been found that turmeric is rapidly metabolized by the liver and intestines, its medicinal properties may not be as effective unless it is consumed with black pepper, which has been found to increase the absorption of curcumin by 2000%.

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

So, not only is turmeric a vibrant natural dye perfect for using this time of year, it has amazing health benefits too. How can you not love this spice!? Turmeric can be consumed dried, cooked, or raw, and has a slightly peppery, mildly bitter and earthy flavor. There are many ways to incorporate turmeric into your cooking and it can also be drank as a tea. A common method I found in my research is to make what’s called, Golden Milk. And to make it, you must first create a turmeric paste…

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

Turmeric Paste
 
Cook time
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Author:
Ingredients
  • ½ cup filtered water
  • ¼ cup ground turmeric
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
Instructions
  1. Combine ingredients in a small saucepan. Heat over medium high heat, stirring constantly until it forms a thick paste. Transfer paste into a small glass jar and store in the refrigerator until ready to use.

 

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

Once you’ve made your turmeric paste, you can make yourself up a warm cup of Golden Milk anytime you want!

Golden Milk
 
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 1 cup
Ingredients
  • 1 cup milk (dairy or nondairy)
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric paste
  • 1 teaspoon coconut oil
  • Honey or maple syrup (to taste)
  • Cinnamon or nutmeg (to taste)
Instructions
  1. Combine the milk, turmeric paste and coconut oil in a saucepan and heat over medium heat until it just starts to boil. Pour into a mug and sweeten with honey and a sprinkle of cinnamon.

 

RECIPE: Golden Milk + the health benefits of Turmeric

DIY: Turmeric Tie-Dye Scarf

DIY: Turmeric Tie-Dye Scarf #natural #dye #tiedye

Tie-dye has been a favorite hobby of mine since I was a kid. I remember first learning to tie-dye as a girl scout at summer camp and it’s what initially inspired my former handmade business, Camp Smartypants back in 2009. While I still love to wear tie-dye today, it’s been years since I’ve dug out my supplies and tie-dyed something new.

DIY: Turmeric Tie-Dye Scarf #natural #dye #tiedye

For my newest hobby (I have many), I’ve taken up the study of herbs and creating my own Materia Medica. When choosing which herb to research next, I settled on Turmeric for it’s amazing orange color (perfect for the fall season). Turmeric is used in Indian and Asian cuisine, it has amazing medicinal properties, and is also used as a natural dye for both food and textiles.

Turmeric is one of my favorite spices (I turn to it often to help ease pain and inflammation) and I was excited to be able to get crafty with it and dye a new scarf to wear this fall season. Of course, I couldn’t resist tying up the fabric before tossing it into the prepared dye, making for a vibrant, natural tie-dye.

DIY: Turmeric Tie-Dye Scarf #natural #dye #tiedye

Supplies Needed

• Turmeric powder (about 1/2 cup)
• White vinegar
• *White natural fiber scarf (like cotton or silk)

Additional Tools

• Large pot
• Rubber gloves
• Waxed thread (I used Flat Sinew)

*I used a white jersey scarf from American Apparel

DIY: Turmeric Tie-Dye Scarf #natural #dye #tiedye

Instructions

First things first, wash and dry your fabric to release any starch that might still be in the fibers. Then simmer fabric in a large pot with a water/vinegar solution for one hour (use 4 parts water to 1 part vinegar). This process creates a fixative for the turmeric dye.

DIY: Turmeric Tie-Dye Scarf #natural #dye #tiedye

Rinse and ring out your fabric under cold water until it no longer smells of vinegar and set aside. Fill the pot with fresh water again (using enough water to cover your fabric) and bring to a simmer. Add the turmeric powder (I used about 1/2 cup of turmeric, but you can use more or less depending on whether you want a dark or light color) and stir until dissolved. Let simmer for about 10 minutes.

DIY: Turmeric Tie-Dye Scarf #natural #dye #tiedye

While the turmeric dye is simmering, tie up your scarf any way you’d like. I like to use flat sinew (a waxed thread) for tie-dye but you can use rubber bands or regular string as well.

DIY: Turmeric Tie-Dye Scarf #natural #dye #tiedye

Submerge the tied fabric into the dye bath and simmer for 15 minutes. Stir the fabric every once in a while to make sure it’s completely soaked in the dye and to prevent the fabric from burning. After 15 minutes, turn off the heat and let the fabric sit in the dye bath for as long as you want. I wanted my scarf to be as dark yellow/orange as possible so I left it in the dye bath for a full 24 hours.

DIY: Turmeric Tie-Dye Scarf #natural #dye #tiedye

Once the fabric is approximately two shades darker than your desired color, remove it from the dye bath and rinse under cold water to remove the excess dye. Cut off your string or remove your rubber bands and continue squeezing and rinsing until the water runs clear again. Place rinsed fabric in the dryer or hang dry.

DIY: Turmeric Tie-Dye Scarf #natural #dye #tiedye

What a fun project! I am so happy with the results and am loving the pungent turmeric aroma that filled my kitchen over the weekend.

I used this post by Itty Bitty Impact as a guide for this project.

Three DIY Projects To Try This Fall

1. Black Cat Stamped Scarf

Carve your own cat stamp and make this purrfectly cute scarf to keep you warm on the brisk autumn days ahead. [Click here for the full tutorial]

DIY Cat Stamped Scarf #craft #kitty #blackcat #fashion #fall

2. Mini Pumpkin Macrame Hanger

Add some unique pumpkin decor to your home with this simple DIY. [Click here for the full tutorial]

DIY: Mini Pumpkin Macrame Holder

3. Felt Sugar Skull Sachets

Watch your favorite fall movie and practice your embroidery stitches to make some felt sugar skulls. [Click here for the full tutorial]

DIY: Felt Sugar Skull Sachets #dayofthedead #diadelosmuertos #embroidery

Hope you all have a wonderful and crafty weekend!

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment
Homemade mustard has been on my to-do list since last spring and I’m excited to finally make up a small batch. Since starting my herb garden this year, I’ve been keeping my eye out for new ways to harvest and use fresh herbs. This recipe from Wonky Wonderful made for a great starting point. I followed her basic guidelines and made some of my own alterations to suite my own tastes.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment

The first step is to soak your mustard seed over night. I combined 1/4 cup mustard seed, with a 1/4 cup filtered water and 1/4 cup four thieves vinegar (you can also use raw apple cider vinegar) in a small mason jar and set it in the refrigerator overnight.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment

The next morning, the mustard seed will have absorbed most of the liquid and be ready to prepare with the rest of the ingredients.

Pour the soaked mustard seed (and remaining liquid) into a food processor and add the following: 2 teaspoons lemon juice, 3 tablespoons honey (add more for a sweeter mustard flavor), 1/2 teaspoon turmeric, 1/4 teaspoon sea salt, and about 1 tablespoon fresh herbs. I also sprinkled in a few red pepper flakes.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

You can use any variety of herbs you like. I chose a few sprigs each of fresh thyme, oregano, parsley, rosemary and marjoram from my garden.

Once you’ve added all the ingredients, puree until you get a nice consistency. Transfer back into a clean mason jar and store in the refrigerator.

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

This mustard will keep in the refrigerator for up to 4 weeks. I can’t wait to try it on my next ham sandwich!

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

Garden Herb Mustard
 
Author:
Recipe type: Condiment
Serves: About 1 cup
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup mustard seed
  • ¼ cup raw apple cider vinegar (I used four thieves vinegar)
  • ¼ cup filtered water
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon fresh herbs
Instructions
  1. Combine the mustard seed, vinegar, and water in a small jar and refrigerate overnight.
  2. Pour soaked mustard seed (and remaining liquid) into a food processor and add the remaining ingredients. Puree to desired consistency. Taste and add more honey or herbs if desired.
  3. Store in a clean mason jar. Refrigerate and use within 3-4 weeks.

 

RECIPE: Garden Herb Mustard #homemade #condiment #herbs

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

I’ve recently taken up the study of herbalism and have begun to create my own Materia Medica in the form of an artist’s book. I plan to spend time with each herb, watching it grow in my garden and harvesting, experimenting with different uses, and even learning its history and folk lore. Lately I’ve been learning and loving sweet, gentle chamomile.

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

I have to admit, since beginning this project I’ve resisted moving on to a new herb. Chamomile is just so caring and nurturing and I’ve been in need of the comfort that chamomile brings. Enjoying a cup of chamomile tea before bed has become a new part of my nightly routine. The other night I decided to change things up a bit and make a chamomile latte by adding almond milk and chamomile infused honey. The result was sweet, creamy and extremely soothing.

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

Chamomile Latte
 
Author:
Recipe type: Drinks
Ingredients
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup milk (I used almond milk)
  • 2 tablespoons dried chamomile
  • 1 teaspoon honey
Instructions
  1. Combine water, milk and dried chamomile in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, then immediately turn down the heat and let simmer for 2 minutes. Strain mixture into a large mug and sweeten with honey.

The cool weather we’ve had this week has reminded me of the Chamomile Cupcakes I baked last summer. Wanting to try something new and use the Infused Sugar I made a while back inspired me to try out this recipe by Bird Is The Word PDX. This was my first time making scones and I think the flavors of both the chamomile and lavender come through quite nicely.

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

Chamomile Lavender Scones
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Recipe type: Dessert
Serves: About 8
Ingredients
  • 2 cups flour
  • ½ cup chamomile infused sugar
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon dried lavender
  • 1 tablespoon dried chamomile (stems removed and flowers crushed with mortar/pestle)
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • 6 tablespoons butter, cut into ½" cubes
  • ½ cup + 2 tablespoons milk or cream
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 2-3 tablespoons chamomile tea
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. In a large bowl mix together the dry ingredients including the lavender and chamomile. Cut the butter in with your fingers, working the mixture until it resembles a coarse sand.
  2. Add milk and mix with your hands until a dough forms. Roll out onto a floured surface to about 1" think. Use a pint glass to cut the scones out of the dough.
  3. Place onto a baking sheet lined with parchment. Bake for 18-20 minutes or until slightly golden.
  4. While the scones cool, brew up a cup of chamomile tea and add it one tablespoon at a time to the powdered sugar until a paste-like frosting forms. Drizzle it over the scones and enjoy!

These scones pair perfectly with a warm Chamomile Latte so whip up a batch and then enjoy the sweet, soothing flavor of chamomile.

RECIPE: Chamomile Lavender Scones + Tea

TODAY: Creative Ways To Heal A Broken Heart

creative-ways-to-heal-a-broken-heart
I recently went through a painful breakup with my boyfriend of five years. It was the longest relationship I’ve ever had and extremely heartbreaking to let go of and accept its end. Coming away from the relationship feeling more heartbroken and emotionally wounded than I’ve ever felt before has prompted me to really commit myself to the process of healing. I know that I don’t want to stay living in my past, thinking about “what might have been”. I want to accept all that’s happened, reflect on the lessons I’ve learned and look forward to the future. I want to heal my heart so that it can reopen fully to new relationships and discover deeper connections with others.

One of the first things I did after the shock of the breakup wore off was go to my local bookstore and pick up a copy of the book, How to Survive the Loss of a Love. I stared at the relationship self help aisle for a long time, overwhelmed by the amount of weird relationship books. I flipped through books like The Breakup Bible and others but decided I wasn’t really interested in reading stories about other people’s horrendous breakups. What I wanted was some simple words of encouragement and a flexible guide to help me through the healing process. Originally published back in 1976, How to Survive the Loss of a Love walks you through the stages of recovery from a loss which are: survival (shock/denial/numbness), healing (fear/anger/depression) and growth (understanding/acceptance/ moving on), and then goes through a sort of checklist with suggestions, reassurances, and resources.

Now that I’m in the healing stage of recovery, I’m learning more and more about what it actually means to heal. For me, it means giving myself time to mourn the loss. My instinct is to push away any feelings of sadness, pain, and anger. But pushing those emotions away for me means holding them in and I’ve learned the hard way what can happen to your body over time if you hold that kind of negativity inside. So instead I’m trying to be with my pain now. To really feel it and allow it to pass through me and be released rather than compartmentalized and ignored.

Creative Ways To Heal A Broken Heart

Being with my pain now has also made me learn to experience the loss differently. At first feeling the fear, anger, desolation and pain would completely overtake me and become too overwhelming to experience. So I’ve learned how to mentally step out of my feelings and simply be with them like I would a close friend, allowing the tears and emotions to flow but focusing on my body and breathing, and telling myself, “You’re OK”, “Everything is going to be OK”.

The ability to self soothe is an extremely valuable skill to have especially when recovering from a loss. Only you can heal yourself and knowing that you have the ability to calm and comfort yourself without having to rely on others is extremely important. You might find your friends and family becoming impatient with your healing process, so it’s important to be able to soothe yourself and stay on track in your healing process without relying on help from others.

Creative Ways To Heal A Broken Heart

There are lots of ways you can self soothe when healing from a loss. Here are some of my favorite creative activities that help to ground me, calm my nerves, and relax:

DIY: Watercolor Affirmation Cards #tutorial

Affirm Yourself.

Combating negative self-talk is so important when healing. We all have moments of feeling unloved, unloveable, fearing that we’ll forever be alone, and the pain will never end. Whenever negative thoughts like that start to creep in I make sure to acknowledge them and then counter them by telling myself, “I am loved and lovable”, “I will recover and things will get better”, “I will find new love”. Make your own cute affirmation cards to carry in your wallet or purse and post in little places around your home and workspace to remind you to think positively.

art-journal-3

Art Journaling.

Express your feelings through Art Journaling or try Soul Collage. Art journaling has been a favorite activity of mine since high school. These days I turn to my art journal whenever I feel like I need to reconnect with my true self. Allowing my intuition to cut, paste, paint, draw, and write helps me to process my emotions and release them into the pages. When working in my art journal I try not to judge or worry about what my finished pages will look like. The focus for me has always been on  the process so instead I draw my attention to color and shape, to my paint or scissors and let my intuition guide me.

Creative Ways To Heal A Broken Heart

Coloring Books.

Adult coloring books are all the rage right now and studies have even shown that coloring is like a form of meditation. So play some soothing tunes, get out your box of markers and colored pencils and spend an evening coloring (and sipping a glass of wine).

Cleanse your space.

Clearing out my closet and sorting through and getting rid of stuff was one of the first things I did after my breakup. I rearranged my entire living room and redecorated my bedroom so that my space felt like the “new me”. I also recommend smudging your space to help get rid of any lingering negative energies that might be stagnant in your house. If you’re curious to know more about the art of smudging, check out this article I wrote for Molly Muriel.

DIY: Jersey Macrame Hanging Planter #craft #home #decor

Get a new houseplant.

After I finished cleansing my space, I shopped for a few new houseplants to give my home some fresh energy. Being close to nature is extremely cathartic for the body, mind and spirit. Bringing nature into your home is an easy way to get creative too with decorative planters and arrangements. Check out a few things I’ve made recently like a Macrame Plant Hanger and Mini Crystal + Succulent Garden.

DIY: Culinary Herb Wreath

Start an herb garden.

Herb gardening is another new hobby of mine and I love that it can be done both indoors and outdoors. Not only has watering and caring for my herb garden become a relaxing part of my daily routine, I also have have fun finding creative ways to harvest the herbs both in the kitchen and in the craft studio. A few of my most recent projects were making an Herb Wreath and also a batch of Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden

Crystal Healing.

This might sound a little too woo-woo for some of you, but I’ve found having a few healing stones and crystals to be extremely soothing. Each stone has a metaphysical quality that relates to the chakras and a special vibration or resonance that gives them the ability to restore stability and balance the body’s energy systems. I recently went to my local rock shop and treated myself to a handful of crystals specifically for healing the heart chakra. I like to choose one stone to carry with me and draw my attention to it throughout the day. You can also place a few stones near your bed or even under your pillow when you go to sleep at night.

Use Color To Uplift Your Spirit.

Color can have a big impact on our general mood. Uplift your spirit by surrounding yourself in cheerful colors through the clothes you wear, the food you eat, the room you spend most of your time in, etc. Red, orange, yellow and pastel colors are all in the “up” spectrum of colors. Green is also a great choice because it is soothing and promotes healing and growth.

A few more suggestions:

  • Keep a journal. If you find yourself stewing in pain or anger or any sort of negative emotion, write it all down in your journal. This can help to get things out of your mind, set them in order and release them.
  • Pamper yourself. If you have a broken leg or are hospitalized, friends and family bring you flowers, send baskets of fruit, and you get to lie in bed all day reading and watching TV. In short, you are pampered. If you have a broken heart, that’s not the case. You are still expected to fulfill your obligations and show up for work with the same energy and efficiency you normally have. So what do you do when the world does not accept the fact that emotional pain not only hurts, but can be debilitating? Pamper yourself! Take a hot bath, get a massage, buy yourself a beautiful new book or magazine, treat yourself to crazy delicious chocolate fudge ice cream, buy yourself a bouquet of flowers.
  • Make plans. Sometimes there’s nothing worse than sitting at home by yourself on a Saturday night. So call up your friends and/or family. Reconnect with people you’ve lost touch with and plan to do something fun together.
  • Let yourself heal fully. If you can, don’t take on any new responsibilities. Don’t get involved in an all-consuming passionate relationship or start any big projects for a while. Let your healing process run its course. Just follow your daily routine and let yourself heal.

 

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar
I can’t remember where exactly I first discovered Four Thieves vinegar, but I was intrigued by its use in history and it’s legendary story. Myth has it that a group of thieves during the European outbreak of the black plague set out to rob the dead and the sick in Marseille. When they were caught, they offered to exchange their secret recipe, which had allowed them to commit the robberies without catching the disease, in exchange for leniency. Another version says that the thieves had already been caught before the outbreak and their sentence had been to bury dead plague victims; to survive this punishment, they created the vinegar.

Recipes for this legendary concoction are as numerous as the stories. The following vinegar recipe hung in the Museum of Paris in 1937, and is said to have been an original copy of the recipe posted on the walls of Marseilles during an episode of the plague:

Take three pints of strong white wine vinegar, add a handful of each of wormwood, meadowsweet, wild marjoram and sage, fifty cloves, two ounces of campanula roots, two ounces of angelic, rosemary and horehound and three large measures of champhor. Place the mixture in a container for fifteen days, strain and express then bottle. Use by rubbing it on the hands, ears and temples from time to time when approaching a plague victim. [Source]

Plausible reasons for not contracting the Plague was that the herbal concoction contained natural flea repellents. Since the flea is the carrier for the Plague bacillus, Yersinia pestis. Wormwood has properties similar to cedar as an insect repellent, as all aromatics like sage, cloves, camphor, rosemary, campanula, etc. Meadowsweet, although known to contain salicyclic acid, it is mainly used to mask odors, like decomposing bodies.

Modern day versions of four thieves vinegar include various herbs that typically include sage, lavender, thyme, and rosemary, along with garlic. Additional herbs sometimes include rue, mint, and wormwood. It has become traditional to use four herbs in the recipe—one for each thief, though earlier recipes often have a dozen herbs or more. It is still sold in Provence. In Italy a mixture called “seven thieves vinegar” is sold as a smelling salt, though its ingredients appear to be the same as in four thieves mixtures.

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar
 
One of the main reasons I wanted to make this vinegar is because I have all of the following herbs growing fresh in my garden! If you have your own herb garden, this is a great way to use your harvest.
Author:
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lavender, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh mint, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh sage, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh thyme, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh marjoram, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh anise hyssop, chopped
  • 4 cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed
  • ½ teaspoon black peppercorns, crushed
  • 3 whole cloves, crushed
  • 16 oz raw apple cider vinegar
Instructions
  1. Combine chopped herbs, spices and garlic in a quart size mason jar and cover with the apple cider vinegar.
  2. Allow to infuse for 7-10 days in a sunny location then strain into a clean jar. Store at room temperature.

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

Uses

Natural Cleanser – The herbs used in this recipe posess strong antimicrobial effects and vinegar, in any case, makes an excellent natural cleanser. Fill a spray bottle with the vinegar and use it to clean and sterilize kitchen counters and bathrooms.
Astringent – Dilute some vinegar with water and use as a cleansing agent or astringent for the skin.
Insect Repellant – Fill a spray bottle with 1/4 cup of vinegar and top with filtered water. Spray on skin, clothes, etc. to deter pesky bugs.
Seasoning – Use as a seasoning for braised meats and vegetables or make a vinaigrette dressing for salads.
Immune Booster – Use like Fire Cider and take a teaspoonful several times a day to prevent cold/flu.

RECIPE: The Legendary Four Thieves Vinegar

DIY: Culinary Herb Wreath

DIY: Culinary Herb Wreath

Herb gardening has become one of my favorite hobbies and this year I’m growing over 25 different types of herbs! There’s nothing better than a backyard garden full of fragrant edible plants. Now that it’s harvest season I’ve been researching ways to use them. I mainly use fresh herbs in cooking. Last year I made up a batch of yummy oregano pesto. I plan to make my own herbal vinegar and infused olive oils this year, but first I wanted to try something completely new- I made a gorgeous culinary herb wreath!

Not only was it fun choosing and harvesting the herbs I chose to use in my wreath, I also love that once the wreath has dried it becomes both decorative and functional. Find a spot in your kitchen (near the stove) to hang an herb wreath and all you have to do is snip off a few sprigs here and there to add to your cooking!

DIY: Culinary Herb Wreath

Read the Tutorial

You can find the full tutorial and make your own herb wreath by visiting my guest post over at Garden Therapy!

SHOW+TELL: Art Journaling Through The Years

SHOW+TELL: Art Journaling Through The Years
This article was originally posted last year over at Punk Projects. But because art journaling is so near to my heart, I thought I’d share it here on Adventures-In-Making too!

SHOW+TELL: Art Journaling Through The Years

My high school art journal.

I’ve been art journaling ever since I first discovered this book by Sabrina Ward Harrison in high school. It was the first time I’d ever seen an ‘art journal’ and I was hooked. I cut up my Seventeen magazines, old National Geographics, and used watercolors, chalk, ink, and anything else I could get my hands on to fill my precious art journal with song lyrics (I was obsessed with Jewel and Alanis Morissette), quotes, collages, and all sorts of angsty teenage FEELINGS. At the end of my senior year, I gave my precious art journal to my English teacher to keep as a time capsule to send me 10 years later. Boy, was that a trip to get in the mail at age 28!

SHOW+TELL: Art Journaling Through The Years

Crazy collage from my high school art journal.

SHOW+TELL: Art Journaling Through The Years

Pages from my high school art journal.

I’ve kept many art journals since then and now use it as a safe place to create intuitively. Whenever I’m feeling lost or overwhelmed by life, I get out my art journal and start filling pages. Doing this calms my nerves, and helps me to reconnect with my true self. I use many of the same techniques I loved in high school. I collect vintage National Geographic magazines, old books and postcards. When I’m working in my art journal, I don’t question or judge myself, but just let my mind and body relax and reflect on where I’m at in life.

SHOW+TELL: Art Journaling Through The Years

Pages from my current art journal.

SHOW+TELL: Art Journaling Through The Years

I’ve been enjoying using color as a main theme.

Since college, I’ve been using vintage books as my art journal medium. There’s something about drawing inside the pages of a book that feels so satisfying. There are no blank white pages staring at me saying “this better be good” and I love choosing an old book with a title and cover that speaks to me.

SHOW+TELL: Art Journaling Through The Years

I now use vintage books at my art journal medium.

SHOW+TELL: Art Journaling Through The Years

I still collect magazine clippings and other ephemera to fill my pages.

What are some of your favorite art journaling supplies, techniques and inspirations?

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden
Crystals and succulents have become some of my latest obsessions. Both are naturally beautiful and when put together make for a breathtaking combination. This has sparked my latest project- making my own mini crystal + succulent garden. I decided to start small with this project and hope to add to it and create larger arrangements as I collect more crystals and succulents. I recommend that you trust your gut with this project and simply follow your intuition when selecting and placing your succulents and crystals.

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden

Supplies Needed

• Succulent plants
• Crystals
• Planter
• Potting Soil

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden

First select your succulents and begin visualizing an arrangement within your planter. When you are ready, fill your planter about half way with potting soil and begin placing each succulent into the pot, filling in with more soil where necessary.

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden

Next, gather your crystals and begin placing them around your succulents. Remember to let your intuition be your guide and arrange your crystals in a way that feels meaningful to you.

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden
DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden

Once you’ve finished, find a sunny spot in your home for your mini crystal succulent garden to glisten and grow.

DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden
DIY: Mini Crystal Succulent Garden